Skip to main content

Full text of "Western Graphic (July-Dec. 1899)"

See other formats


CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 




D 5DD7 imSETS 1 

California Stale Library 



I 



1 




Western Graphic 



CVPYRightKI) ]89S 



Mil ILLUSTRATED WCEK&T JOUfcttAL 
fOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 




Volume VII. 
Number i. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July \ y 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 


















* 















Miss Dhlia Stacby— ise C p aK eu) 








Western Graphic 



McCall's J.ly Patterns and Magazines Now In 




BATHING SUIT WEATHER 

The pleasure of a dip in old ocean is doubled when you 
have your own bathing suit. You are sure it is clean and that 
it fits you. The life of a good bathing suit is so long that the 
first cost does not count for anything to speak of. Our assort- 
ment of bathing suits for men. women and children was never 
so complete as it is right now. 



MEN'S BATHING SUI1S 

Men's Suits, one or two pieces, 
fancy stripe jersey knit, all 
wool $2. CO 

Men's all wool Worsted Knee 
Length Suits, plain or fancy col- 
ored effects $3.00 

Men's extra fine Worsted Bathing 
Suits, with fancy trimming. $3 00 

Boys' all wool Bathing Suits.. .$1.25 



WOMEN'S BATHING SUITS 

Women's Bathing Suits of (laurel, 
handsomely trimmed 

.....S2.00 to £4.00 

Women's Bathing Suits of Mack or 
blue alpaca, with braid trim- 
mings f 3 .50 to $6. 00 

Bathing Suits for little girls and 
misses, wool materials $2.00 to 

$2.75; cotton material Si. 25 

Bathing Caps from 15c to 75c 

Bathing Shoes from 25c to 50c 



CALIFORNIA BLANKETS— Just the thing for campers and 
seaside cottages, $2.95 a pair. 

COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 

317-325 South Broadway Between Third and Fourth 



Spend the Summer 



AT 



and 



San Diego 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



June 16 and 17 August 4 and 5 

July I and 2 September I and 2 

Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

tnqaira of Santa Fe Route Agent 'J00 South Spring Street (cor. Jud) Ix>s Angelei 



f 
$ 

$ 
$ 

$ 

$ 
w 

$ 

SI/ 

m 



FINEST MARKER SHOP SOITH OF VAN Sl'YS HOTEL IN CONNECTION 



Plain 
Electric 

From 15 cts to 5o cts 

Ladies private entrance on Wall street 



BATHS 



Medic a the 
Vapor 



F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

252 EAST FIFTH ST 




HON. DAVID BRKMNER HEX I) K liSON. 

. It w »H »ver but the forma] recording of the vote. 11.. n. David B. Eendenon, of 
:owa, ih to be speaker of the next house of repittentatiTM. It looks now as if Iih will 
lave the nnammona support of the Repitblioon members. Mr. Henderson has 
epres.-med the I hud Iow a district in nine successive congresses. Me v -is b u n in 
Scotland ;ind is oft v<':irx «<m 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the poatofltee in I.os Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates. The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



ft 



ROSE PURITY WATER 



. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER from Highland Glen, California. The 
analysis of ROSE I'l ' It 1 1 V WATER shows it to contain the most healthful properties known f. r 
Constioation, Indigestion and Kidney ditliculties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use It is nicely furnished in one and five-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all poiuts of the 
city and towns through our agents. You are ii vited to visit us, sie our beautiful location and 
established improvements for delivery of ROSE Pt'RITY WATER to fll our customers. Try it and 
tiud as stated. W here it has its way it Hows night and day. It is cool and cl ar as crystal as it 
runs from the Spring Rock Kouitain head. It is not a dead water; its virtue for h allh is Spirit, 
Life and Purity. For orders addre»s 



LOS ANGKI.KS, CAL. 
Tel. Sub Station IO 



LAMB & WHITNEY, 



l\\X.\ DBS V AMI 49th A\ KM KS 



JOSKI'll MAIKK, C.KOKi.K 7.0HKI.KIN 

Fres and Trcas. Yice-I'res. and Sec y 

HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier & Zobelein 

B rewery 

444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91 




JEFFERY & JEFFERY 

High Art 

Business Suits to Order 

$ 1 0 to $ 1 2.50 Moved to 406 S. Spring St. 

LA Oft O * 58SSSSSSSSSSSS8SSSSS8SSS8S 

♦ A* OUlpJlUr OpringS and Baths 

5 • *)»» Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and H51 Howard St. 

£ These Baths are recommended by tbe medical profession for the cure of 
Kidney ana I.iver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. 

A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 




WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number i. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 1, 1899. 



I i' de Luxe 
10 Cents ■ Copy 



Western Graphic 



roc so^Tnc trs (Mirop.-uv- 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 




EDITOR 



THERE need be no fear that our arms 
will not succeed in the Philippines, 
anti-imperalists (so-called) and scareheads of 
yellow journals to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing. The capture of Manila and the destruc- 
tion of the Spanish fleet in its bay was an 
incident in the late war with Spain that 
could not be excluded from the settlement and 
the rebellion of Aguinaldo as a consequence 
was bequeathed our country as an aftermath 
which has assumed proportions that were not 
looked for. But it would have been almost 
as impossible for our Government to have 
turned tail as it would have been on any occa- 
sion where reverses instead of triumphs have 
dotted the landscape of war. Generals Mer- 
ritt and Miles declared from the first that 
many thousands of good soldiers would be 
required to establish our dominion through- 
out the Philippines, and the aspect of affairs 
just at present seems to be corroborative of 
the declarations of these two distinguished 
soldiers. And it may be that General Otis 
has made some mistakes and has underesti- 
mated the strength of the enemy and the 
character of the country and its people. But 
all that does not warrant a change in com- 
manders, neither does it make things appear 
so blue as the antis would have us to believe. 
On the contrary, the situation shows that we 
need more men and more fighting, and these 
will quickly follow, and peace commissions 
will hereafter be given to understand that 
they can fool us no more. 

It would seem that A guinaldo's peace com- 
mission was one of that astute commanders's 
creations to gain time or for some other covert 
purpose. In the first place these commission- 
ers, after several days of negotiations, had to 
admit that they had no power to make terms, 
and that the insurgents were not willing to 
accept anything short of independence under 
a possible protectorate. In other words, the 
negotiations were meant merely to gain 
time. These Filipinos, after succeeding in 
completely drawing the wool over the eyes of 
our commissioners, returned to the insurgent 
headquarters with the promise that they 
would soon return. General Otis, in dismiss- 
ing them from the American lines, intimated 
in very positive terms that they would not be 
permitted to return unless they were prepared 
to agree to an absolute and unconditional 
surrender. While the negotiations were in 
progress military operations were con- 
tinued without interruption, the administra- 
tion preferring not to interfere with said mili- 
tary operations. Although Mr. Shureman, 
President of the Philippine Commission, ap- 
peared to be sanguine that the Filipino envoys 



would soon return with an acceptance of the 
American proposals, the President did not 
share this hopefulness, haviDg apparently 
been convinced, very much against his hopes, 
that he had been misled in considering a set- 
tlement of the insurrection close at hand. 
Preparations are making to send fresh troops 
to the Philippines, as well as for the with- 
drawal of the volunteers, who have for so long 
borne the brunt of the fighting. It is said 
that the President realizes that the insurgents 
must be entirely crushed out and thoroughly 
beaten; hence there is no alternative but to 
wage a relentless campaign against them un- 
til they are compelled to lay down their arms 
and sue for peace. 



The death of Judge William H. Clark, a 
Superior Judge of Los Angeles count)', re- 
moves from our midst one of the most cap- 
able and upright justices that has ever sat 
upon the bench in this state. No one who 
ever had a case in his keeping had fear that 
he was either cowardly or corrupt. He was a 
most charming person, and, like Mercutio, 
was only a short time before his death humor- 
ous regarding his "taking off." He was a 
graduate of Harvard and was a cultivated 
gentleman in every way. He had been a vic- 
tim of consumption for many years, but for a 
long time possessed that rare belief in the 
overthrow of the malady that those afflicted 
with the dread disease generally maintain. As 
a clubman he was genial, witty, cynical, con- 
vivial and entertaining, and he will be a long 
time missed by all who knew him intimately 
in court and out. His remains were followed 
to their last resting place by a large proces- 
sion of those who knew and loved him well. 



Colorado is going to send a gold girl to- 
the Paris Exposition, the estimated cost being 
$1,000,000. She will at least be worth her 
weight in gold. Nevertheless there are Cali- 
fornia girls that are worth more than a mil- 
lion in hard cash and there are others that 
have no substantial assets of that character 
that cannot be estimated by ducats. There 
is one thing certain: — no fellow can run away 
with that Colorado maid. 



The late re union of Teddy Roosevelt's 
Rough Riders at Las Vegas, New Mexico, was 
picturesque and jocund all the way through. 
A washout of six or seven hours kept some of 
the heroes of Las (iuasimas and San Juan 
Hill hot during that length of times, but they 
got there with both feet in course of acceler- 
ated schedule. Governor Roosevelt made a 
speech that was worth reading and Joe 
Wheeler sent one of his characteristic tele- 
grams. No regiment ever known has a better 
right to rejoice and renew the bonds of com- 
radeship than Teddy's Terrors of the Wild 
West. 



With a last grand pull, the N. E. A. com- 
mitteemen are closing their work up, and so 
well have they labored that every detail will 
have been attended to and time to spare be- 
fore the opening day of the big convention. 

Besides the Chinese theatrical company 



which will play in our little Cathay, the 
Chinese merchants have become so interested 
that they propose making an industrial ex- 
hibit that will, no doubt, prove as fascinating 
and instructive as anything in the whole 
week's program. 

Chairman C. B. Boothe, of the transporta- 
tion and excursion committee, has perfected 
arrangements for obtaining information of 
delegates in transit from six to twenty-four 
hours in advance of their arrival. 

Chairman Anderson of the hotel committee, 
with a corps of clerks, took charge of the in- 
formation bureau at 425 S. Spring Btreet this 
week, where post, telegraph and railway ticket 
offices will be maintained, and Mr. Anderson 
will advise inquirers where to buy red lemon- 
ade or quarter sections of orange groves, 
according to their needs. 

On Wednesday the twelfth Esperanza Par- 
lor N. D. G. W., assisted by Los Angeles and 
Ramona Parlors Native Sons, will keep open 
house in the Los Angeles Athletic Club rooms. 
Thursday evening there will be a pleasant 
diversion provided at Hollenbeck Park by the 
Boyle Heights Improvement Association. Il- 
luminated Hoats on the lake, music and fire- 
works will be the attractions. 

Treasurer Frank again wishes to call 
attention to the magnitude of the undertaking 
of this convention, and urges property holders 
and professional men not to leave the entire 
burden on the business men. More money is 
needed, and Mr. Frank has a heartfelt bless- 
ing on tap for every donor — something like 
"The Lord and I loveth a cheerful giver." 



The many friends of Mrs. Mary L. I'ea- 
body, mother of J. C. and Annie L. Peabody, 
will regret to learn of her death which took 
place last Tuesday evening. Mrs. Peabody 
had reached an advanced age, but was com- 
paratively active up to a short time before 
her death. She devoted her life to good 
works, and, with her husband, was many 
years a missionary in Turkey. She was 
greatly beloved by all who knew her. Her 
funeral took place Friday afternoon, this 
week. 

The members of the Pine Tree State Asso- 
ciation will celebrate the fifth year of its ex- 
istence with a patriotic reunion at Verdugo 
Park on Tuesday, July 1th. Maine people 
with their families from all over the county 
are making preparations to attend in large 
numbers. There will be brief literary exer- 
cises, including an address by Arthur W. 
Kinney, Receiver of the United States Land 
Office, to be followed by music and games. 
Luncheon will be served at the tables in the 
grove. 

Miss Josephine Williams will give a 
Grecian evening Friday, July 7th, at Elk's 
Hall. She will give Tennyson's " Lotus Eat- 
ers," illustrated by moving tableaux, and will 
be assisted by leading musical talent. 

Tim: Bradley Martins have followed the 
example of one of the Astors and become 
subjects of the queen. If this sort of thing 
keeps up long enough New York will, in time 
become an American city. 




THE lime is not far distant when South- 
ern California will successfully compete 
with the shores of the Mediterranean and the 
Bosphorus in the preparation of the fig. 
Already there is a numher of producers that 
have attained acknowledged success in the 
treatment of olives and olive oil. We sam- 
pled some of the former in Jevne's a few days 
ago and found them all that could be desired, 
while Kimball of San Diego and Cooper of 
Santa Barbara have established a splendid 
reputation for their olive oil. The fig is pecu- 
liarly luxuriant in Southern California, and 
it is a noble fruit. But, some how or other, 
we have not yet learned how to preserve it so 
that it may alternate with the foreign fruit in 
beauty and excellence. Time and experience 
will remedy this, however, just as it has in 
the preparation of olives and olive oil. It 
was not so long ago when all the prunes used 
in this country were purchased elsewhere. 
Now there are tens of thousands of pounds of 
this healthful fruit exported annually, and as 
much as seven hundred dollars' worth have 
been taken in one year from an acre of trees. 
The beholder is sometimes bewildered at the 
possibilities of this country, which, besides 
producing all the fruits and vegetables known 
to a northern clime, give us the orange, the 
lemon, pomegranate, lime, fig, guava, apricot, 
nectarine, walnut, almond and many other 
productions not necessary to mention. O, 
this is a wonderful country, and no mistake. 



Notiiino has made a better showing in 
Southern California since its commencement 
than the beet sugar enterprise, there being 
three concerns in successful operation at the 
present time; and the impetus that has, 
during the past year or two, been given to the 
beet sugar industry in this country has re- 
sulted in the formation of scores of other 
companies which wi'l, as sooon as possible, 
begin the manufacture of this commodity. 
For this reason a report made to the State 
Department showing the growth of the beet 
sugar industry in Germany, between 1877 
and 1899, is of interest. 

In 1877 there were in that country 258,809 
acres of beets cultivated, the yield being 
11.088 tons per acre, the value of which was 
•1>55.45 per acre or $5 per ton for the beets. In 
1899 the cultivated area had increased to 

I, 054,229 acres, the yield per acre being 

II. 510 tons and the value $4 per ton. 

In 1877 the number of German factories 
operated 329, the beets worked were 4,090,968 
tons and the product of raw sugar was 378,009 
tons. In 1899 the number of factories had 
incieased to 401, the quantity of beets worked 
reached 12,144,291 tons and the production 
of raw sugar had increased to 1,710,000 tons. 
It is to be observed that the cultivation of the 
beet had largely increased its richness of 
sugar, for in 1877 it took 10 82 ions of beets to 
produce one ton of raw sugar, but in 1899 it 
required only 7.1 tons to yield a ton of sugar. 
The amount of sugar in the beet had increased 
from 9.24 per cent, in 1877 to 13.15 per cent, 
in 1899. 



The importance of this marvelous devel" 
opment of the sugar industry in Germany, 
and in France as well, is seen in the condi- 
tion of affairs in the British We6t Indies. 
The troubles of which those colonial posses- 
sions complain are all due to the fact thatthe 
cane sugar they formerly produced and sold 
in the English markets has been supplanted 
by the beet sugar from Germany and France. 
England will not buy Indian sugar because it 
can get a more satisfactory product nearer 
home, and the United States will not lower 
its tariff to admit it because it is encouraging 
a -beet sugar industry of its own. 

ANOTHER FUNNY FELLOW 

THE Westkrn Graphic presents this 
week a likeness of Winfield C. Hoga- 
boom, the Los Angeles newspaper man whose 
writings are now attracting attention and 
who promises to add another name to the list 
of famous American humorists who have 
come out of the west. 

Mr. Hogaboom has been indulging his pro- 
pensity for writing funny things for several 
years, but his work has always been desultory 
and i ts publication widely scattered, and only 
of late has it attracted more than passing at- 
tention. 

People who lived in Southern California 




WINFIELD C. HOUABOOM 



ten years ago will recall to memory the Gar- 
vanza Gazette. It was a little weekly paper 
devoted principally to the booming of real 
estate in the cozy little suburban town, but 
its editor was Winfield C. Hogaboom, and 
never an issue appeared without containing a 
lot of droll humor and harmless satire. The 
reader would stumble onto it anywhere in the 
paper; in the middle of an editorial on the 
necessity for planting more shade trees, or at 
the tail end of a notice of the next revival 
meeting at the M. E. Church. 

The Gazette died, unfortunately, after a 
little more than a year of existence, and its 
fun-loving editor next drifted over all of the 



Pacific coast working as a reporter and special 
writer on the daily papers of all the cities 
from San Diego to Portland. 

Occasionally one of his intensely humor- 
ous stories or sketches would appear on the 
surface and set everybody to laughing, but 
they were few and far between, and scattered 
hither and yon, and the writer's reputation 
was not extended greatly. 

About five years ago Mr. Hogabcom re- 
turned to Los Angeles, and after working for 
a while as a reporter on the Herald he entered 
the employ of the great news-gathering and 
distributing concern, the Associated Press, as 
day editor of its Los Angeles news service. 
He is still occupying that position, but finds 
time now to contribute frequently to news- 
papers and magazines. WESTERN Graphic 
has published a number of hie articles. 

Mr. Hogaboom seldom sends anything ot 
a humorous nature to eastern journals. He 
says he does not like to shock an editor un- 
necessarily, and so he sends his articles only 
to those editors who know him and under- 
stand his peculiarities. 

Mr. Hogaboom has been influenced by a 
well known literary man of New York, who 
has long been an admirer of his work, to pre- 
pare a number of his sketches and stories for 
publication in book form. The book will be 
published under the title of ''Tales for Thin 
People" sometime during the summer. It 
will surely have a ready and extensive sale. 

The Soldiers' Return 

he. 

And have you then no word of cheer, 

No friendly smile for me? 
And shall I have no welcome home 

From dangers o'er the sea? 
I've braved the fevers and the ills 

Of distant lands and drear, 
And shall I now come home to find 

Cold disappointment here? 

I've eaten beef that was embalmed, 

I've faced the savage foe; 
I've shared the hardships and the pains 

That only soldiers know; 
I've fretted for the hour when 

My service should be through, 
And shall I have no word of cheer, 

No welcome now from you? 

SHE. 

And can you bring yourself to ask 

For words of cheer from me, 
For smiles of welcome since you've come 

Back home across the sea? 
I cheered you when you went away 

To share a soldier's lot 
And fearlessly rush in where there 

Were battles to be fought. 

I waved my handkerchief for you 

The day you went away; 
I may have shed a tear or two, 

But things are changed to-day. 
You wrote stuff for the magazines 

While you were o'er the sea, 
But never seemed to have the time 

To drop a line to me. 

Statues and characters are moulded with 
little touches. 

When a fool doesn't act like a fool he fools 
a lot of other people. 

It's their crooked ways that enable some 
men to make both ends meet. 

The doorstep originated the stamp collect- 
ing fad. 



Western Graphic 



5 




Cown Calk and prattle 



THERE was a meeting of the Sunset Club 
last evening at the Levy Cafe, and 
quite a large number of members were pres- 
ent, many being drawn on account of the an- 
nouncement that the paper of the evening 
would be read by Judge Enoch Knight, a 
prominent and popular member. The title of 
the paper was "The Genesis and the Genius of 
Our Territorial Growth;" and it was enthusi- 
astically received and elicited an animated 
discussion. The Midsummer Dinner of the 
Sunseters will take place at Terminal Island 
sometime in July. 

"Well, I'll be teetotally 1" and 

then there camedown apound on Henry's desk 
that made nearly everything tremble in that 
part of the Baker block; — and it all came 
from a perusal of the following paragraph: 
"Spain believes that American rule in the 
Philippines will prove a fiasco. Spain also 
believed it utterly impossible for America to 
whip her. After vigorous argument, Spain 
changed her mind on one point and she may 
yet on another. There is no more chance of 
America's failing to do what she has made up 
her mind to do than there is of Hostetter's 
Stomach Bitters failing to cure any stomach 
trouble, or any disease arising from a weak 
" and that's when the swearing com- 
menced and the fist came down on the desk. 



"No, Georce, dear," said the Pasadena 
girl, firmly, as she absent-mindedly detached 
a straw from the fur on her Altman gown, 
"It is a dreadful temptation and all the un- 
disciplined longings of my heart tempt me to 
yield to your persuasions, but I cannot — nay, 
dare not — consent." And she looked with 
timid glance tempered with adamantine de- 
termination at the gloomy youth who heard 
her words with a portentous silence as he sat 
by her side jingling a two-bit piece and a 
dime carelessly in his right hand pocket. 

Anon, recollecting himself, he pulled down 
firmly his Chinese laundred cuffs with an air 
of decision and began almost mechanically: 

"Why do you deny so simple a request? 
I " 

"George," broke in his fair companion 
sternly, "You are reckless. There are lines 
that must not be crossed. You know my 
position in the swagger set but you know not 
upon what a slender thread it hangs. No, 
George, girls with less at stake, born in hum- 
bler spheres, may accept an invitation from a 
young man to attend the theater, but you 
must know in our set it is never done. The 
mere suspicion that a girl in Pasadena's 400 
had accepted the public escort of a young 
man would ruin her socially for life. George," 
sobbed the duckling of the social swim con- 
vulsively, "It can't be did." 

The two "Rockyfellers" stood on the 
southwest corner of First and Main. 

They were seedy and smelt of beer and off 
color onion and liver lunch. 

Their expectations and expectorations 
were big and so was their cheek. 




"If things were run the right way," said 
one of them, "there would be plenty of cash 
all over'the country: this c'ty would be rotten 
with money." 

"Right you are," acquiesced the other. "If 
the big corporations wou'd pay their taxes in 
the same ratio~the*poor man does there would 
be plenty of money. - What we want is money 
and confidence. Things are not run on busi- 
ness prin — " 

"Hold on. There comes a jay. Hit him 
for a dime and don't let him off short of a 
nickel, and I'll go for that young 'rounder 
with a fresh jag on opposite. 

But the big policeman that flirts with 
street cars at the crossing had been eyeing the 
two financiers of the Natick" curb and saw 
that neither his young jaglet nor his old jay- 
ness was approached by the two left-over cam- 
paign touchers. 

To beat a restaurant may be easy enough 
when one knows how, but to succes-fully keep 
up the game is quite the reverse. 

Patrons in a quick-lunch emporium were 
treated to an incident yesterday that was not 
on the bill of fare. A man with a forty-cent 
check in his hand stood at the cashier's desk 
and loudly declared that he had been charged 
forty cents for an article scheduled on the 
price list at ten cents. The cashier thought 
there must be some mistake and called the 
waiter. By the time that autocrat of the 
beanery arrived the forty-cent check man re- 
membered that the man who had occupied the 
chair next to his own at the counter had prob- 
ably taken the ten-cent check and left his 
forty-cent one. 

When the waiter heard that part of the 
story a look of intelligence spread itself o'er 
his face and without ado he siezed the man 
with the check and pushed him into the 
street. 

"You see," said the waiter as he slid an 
order of pork and beans to a man farther 
down the counter, "that chap and his partner 
are professional restaurant 'beats.' They will 
go into a place like this, for instance, and sit 
side by side. One will give a ten-cent order 
while the other will get an elaborate meal. 

"They pretend to be total strangers. The 
one with the big meal will get through first, 
pick up the ten-cent check and leave his own 
in its place. He is usually given plenty of 
time to get safely away before his partner in- 
side makes a kick about the exchange of 
checks." 

"But how did you know this man was try- 
ing to beat the house?" asked the young man 
who was eating coffee and rolls. 

"Oh, I recognized him. In the last place 
where I worked he and his partner worked 
that game on rae twice and I've been on the 
lookout for 'em ever since." 

Some Scraps of Papers 

SUPPOSED TO HAVE II KEN FOUND IN THE WKITINO 
DESK OF MRS. ARKSIIAW 

1. "Mrs. Arkshaw presents her compli- 



ments 1o Mrs. Rlack Brunswick and would be 
obliged if in future — " 

Note on the above.— Unfinished. Probably 
because communication in the third person 
becomes very difficult when it has to extend 
over six pages. Besides, in spite of the ve- 
hement quarrel that morning the two ladies 
had been intimate friends for three years; and 
there was the possibility that if Mrs. Arkshaw 
sent her compliments to Mrs. Black Bruns- 
wick Mrs. Black Brunswick would laugh, and 
laughter would never do. 

2. " Dear Mrs. Black Brunswick : After 
what occurred between us this morning it 
would be superfluous for me to write to you 
to tell you that our friendship is at an end. 
To speak candidly I have never considered 
your perceptions very delicate, but even to you 
this must have been obvious. What I do wish 
to say is, that I think it better if not only our 
friendship but even our acquaintanceship ter- 
minated from this date. I shall certainly 
never come to your house again and I cannot 
pretend that it would give me any pleasure if 
you came to mine. We had better cease to 
know each other. I am sure that when Charles 
comes home to-night and I tell him what you 
said about the bahy he will quite agree with 
me that I am taking the only proper course. 
I repeat again what I said this morning. The 
child is not spoilt, nor can I agree with you 
that actual cruelty is any part of one's mater- 
nal duty. It seems rather hard after all 
these years of clo.se and intimate friendship, 
which — " 

Note on the above. — Unfinished. Probably 
on re-reading Mrs. Arkshaw found some ex- 
pressions almost rude. She may have con- 
sidered the formality of the "Dear Mrs. Black 
Brunswick" to be a little forced and absurd. 
Besides, the last line evidently , suggested the 
superior dignity of the pathetic attitude as 
taken up in the next. 

3. "My Dear Laura: I think this is one 
of the saddest days in my life. I suppose you 
can have no idea how deeply and sincerely I 
have always valued your friendship or you 
would not have used the words which you did 
this morning You could have offered me no 
greater insult than the implication that I had 
in any way neglected my maternal duties. 
Still more did it pain me to hear you suggest 
that my little child actually required corporeal 
punishment. It was so unlike you, so little 
what I should have expected from you. Until 
that moment I had not only loved but re- 
spected you. I had the highest opinion of 
your tenderness and humanity. And now all 
is gone. I can hardly see for tears, but — " 

Note on the above. — Unfinished. Probably 
on consideration it was found ihat the pathetic 
attitude had run a little bit to seed and was, 
in fact, in danger of degenerating into senti- 
mentality. Possibly, also, the mention of 
what Mrs. Black Brunswick said recalled 
somewhat vividly to the mind of Mrs. Ark- 
shaw what she herself had said. Hence the 
next attempt: 

4. "My Dear Laura: In the little talk 
which we had together this morning I am 
aware that I used some very strong expres- 
sions. I used them deliberately — not because 
I had lost my temper in any way. But there 
are one or two of them which you perhaps 
misunderstood, and I need not say how sorry 
I should he if any misunderstanding came be- 
tween us. When I said that the color of your 
hair was — " 

Note on the above. — Unfinished. Obviously 
given up because of the extreme difficulty of 
explaining by letter that though you really 
meant what you said, you did not really menn 
what you said. Further cooling and reflection 
account for the next: 

5. "Darling Laura: I am afraid I was 
rather nasty this morning, but you know how 
sensitive I am about baby. Please forgive me 
and come round to tea this afternoon and we 
will be as good friends as ever." 

Note on the above. — Invitation sent out 
and accepted. 



6 



Western Graphic 




To tiik Profession— A special feature of the We tern 
Graphic is its Departmeut of Musicand Art, which is in charge 
of an experienced and careful editor. Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and will he published free. All communications 
should he sent in hv Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Kditor of Western 
Ghafhu', Los Angeles. 

THE ORATORIO of the "Creation," which 
is being carefully rehearsed for the clos- 
ing concert of the Chautauqua assembly, un- 
der the direction of Professor Bacon, promises 
something that has never been excelled in 
Southern California. There was a full at- 
tendance on Tuesday evening last, as it was 
understood that the roll was to be closed and 
that none could enter after the 27th. Profes- 
sor Bacon states that he will organize a per- 
manent oratorio society this coming fall, for 
the purpose of giving standard oratorios in 
Los Angeles during the coming season, and 
that those taking part in his Chautauqua 
chorus will be charter members. 

Next to Professor Bacon, the busiest mu- 
sical person in Los Angeles is J. T. Fitzgerald, 
who is simply overflowing with business as 
chairman of the N. E. A. music committee, 
which has about completed its arrangements 
for the coming of the teachers. 

Miss Bkresiord Joy, so well and favorably 
known in Los Angeles, has resigned her posi- 
tion in the choir of Calvary church, San Fran- 
cisco, and will leave about the middle of July 
for Chicago to accept a choir position and to 
fill other engagements there. 

The Woman's orchestra is arranging for 
concerts to be given in the near future at 
Blanchard's music hall. 

The Musical Courier says of Miss Marie 
Cobb, so well known in Los Angeles : " Few 
women have so successfully and so justly 
broken the barriers of opposition as Miss 
Marie L. Cobb, the pianist, whose playing 
has a peculiar fascination. Her work is so 
musicianly and rarely musical, her singing 
quality of tone so remarkable — and to this 
ahe adds a force unusual in a woman." Miss 
Cobb is in Chicago again after her coast 
tour and her engagement at the Wichita festi- 
val. 

The pupils of Mrs. \V. G. Cogswell met 
Tuesday morning at the home of their teacher. 
The program that was rendered included the 
following: "The Swallow," Frida Hellman; 
11 The Echo in the Heart," Mrs. A.C. Smither; 
" Greatly Rejoice," from " The Messiah," Miss 
Susie Cogswell; sketch of " The Messiah," 
Mrs. Cogswell; " With Verdure Clad," from 
"The Creation," Miss Katherine Meyer, 
sketch of " The Creation," Mrs Cogswell; so- 
prano solo from " In a Persian Garden," Miss 
Sarah Cogswell. Mrs. Cogswell entertained 
further by reading an instructive paper on 
"Oratorios." In an interesting manner she 
told of the beginning of the oratorios, and 
traced their history up to the j resent time. 

The last meeting for the season of the 
Gounod Club was held Tuesday evening at the 
home of Professor and Mrs. W. G. Cogswell in 
South Flower street. The president of the 
club, W. H. Kluseman, made a few remark?, 
that were followed by a musical program con- 
sisting of the following: "The Armorer's Song," 
Will Hancock; " Fifth Concerto," for violin, 



(Vieuxtemps), Mis* Susie Cogswell; "The 
Echo in the Heart," ( Hastings), Mrs. A. C. 
Smither; " Because," H. L. Pierce; sextet 
from "Lucia," Mrs. C. E. Washburn and 
Messrs. Cogswell, J. Hughes Davies, H. Ed- 
ward Daviesand Will Hancock. The program 
was followed by a guessing game in which 
prizes were awarded. Refreshments were 
served during the evening. 

At Tin: commencement concert given by 
the Choral Union of Pomona College, on Mon- 
day evening last in the college chapel at Clare- 
mont, two artists of L03 Angeles, Miss Grace 
Longley, soprano at Christ's Episcopal chnrch, 
and Mr. Paul Jennison, the 'cellist, were the 
soloists of the evening. 

Mr. Jennison appeared twice in the latter 
half of the program, rendering as his first se- 
lection "Andante and Finale of Concerto" by 
Golterman, and a Sonata (old style) by Boc- 
cherini. His playing was a wonderful reve- 
lation to the majority of his audience, many 
expressing the opinion that they had never 
before realized the marvelous power for mov- 
ing a crowd which the 'cello possessed. In 
many of his pianissimo passages, in the hall, 
whose acoustic properties seem excellent, it 
would have been possible to have heard the 
dropping of a pin, so attentive were his listen- 
ers. After both appearances he was called 
back, and graciously responded to the ap- 
plause of the students by giving an encore 
selection each time. 

The first half of the program, in which Miss 
Longley appeared as principal soloist, con- 
sisted of Gaul's cantata of " Ruth." A chorus 
made up of the students and members of the 
faculty, to the number of over thirty voices, 
and to supply the other solo portions of the 
cantata, made this portion of the program 
very excellent and well received. Later Miss 
Longley sang Chaminade's " Summer," a se- 
lection which admitted of the demonstration 
of the compass and quality of the voice, as 
well as showing the ability to interpret, the 
selection being one which is by no means easy 
of interpretation. 

Having more opportunity to prove the ex- 
cellence of her voice (which in quality is rich 
and full, possessing much power,) in this 
bright selection than in the more sombre mu- 
sic of the cantata, Miss Longley received a 
very enthusiastic encore, which was responded 
to with a selection appropriate to the occasion 
and to the character of the audience. 

Mrs. Eva Ellsworth Dungan, whom her 
many Los Angeles friends recollect when she 
resided here and before she became Mrs Dun- 
gan, is now in New York city and sailed the 
24th of this month for Europe, to continue 
the study of music during the summer. This 
fall she will travel in India and Africa, re 
turning to the United States at the close of 
the Paris exposition. She has been quite 
busy musically during the past winter, and 
has received many offers for concert tours the 
coming winter. 

Phok. and Mrs. Thomas W. Wilde sail on 
the steamer Coronna, on the 17th of July, for 
British Columbia, to be gone about a month. 



MUSIC AL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MME, GENEVRA 

JO HNS TONE-BISHOP 

CONCERT and ORATORIO SOLOIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

Pupil: Madame Anna de La (irange, Paris: Signor Bandaggcr, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio— Blanciiakd Mrsir and Art firn.DiNG 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mts. Modini-Wood 

i>07 f'igueroa street. 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

\ OICE 

COMPOSITION 
THKOltV 

230 Hkli.man Block 

THOMAS W\ WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and IIAKMONT 

Organist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 

RESIDENCE AND STUDIO G21 W EST 17TII 



MRS. F. RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
and SOLO PI 4NISTE 

References: 

Blanchard Piano Co., L. A. 614 Soitii Main Street, 
Edward Schirner, Berlin 

Moritz Moszkowski, Paris Los Angeles, Cal. 

J. BOND FRANC I SCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
and TE AC II Kit 

Pupil of 

Emaniel Wihth, Berlin 
Be.nno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 



Studio- 



BLANCHARD BUILDING 




MRS. W. B. CLAPP 

TEACHEK OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 

MISS M YRTLE CANAD Y 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and cuncetrs accepted. 

At Studio SPITE 310 HI.ANCIIARI) BUILDING Wednesdav, 
Residence— (Thursday, Saturday, forenoons. 

California Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M 1181 

MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHER OK PIANO-FORTE Ml S I < 

Pupil of J. H. Haiin, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory of 
Music; and of II. C. Post, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Sti dio, 433 W. Ninth St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANIST 



FRED. 



BACON 



TEACHER OF VOICE CULTURE 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday. Thursday, Saturday 
SITTE 31.S&319 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTURE 
Pure Italian Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

:;ir, blanchard building 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VOICE CULTURE 

Formerly Soprano with the B BY WOOD Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, 816 BLANCHARD Building 



ROLLA E. GARDNER 

RANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra .Studio, 230% South Spring St 

mTjTs" m. c. peTrTs cTn 

VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal culture, piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 1U22 8. GRAND AVE. 



PROF. M 



A R E V A L O 



GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice Culture 
Studio, 126 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and First Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 



Telephone 
Main 14S 



MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STI DIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 6 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Pasadena, Calif., mornings 



MISC ELLAN E 0 U S 

X. m7~ e d e l m a n 



ARCHITECT 

Removed to BLANCHARD MUSIC HALL BUILDING 
Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone, Red 1341 

G. A. D O B I N S O N 

DRAMATIC TRAINING 

VOICE and PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Studio 526 8 Spring Apply by letter or between hours of 10-12M 



Western Grapliig 



7 



During their absence they will visit Mrs. W. 
J. Harris in Spokane for a few days. Her 
daughter, Miss Louise Harris, who has studied 
previously in Los Angeles with Mr. Wilde, 
will return this fall to renew her work with 
him and to continue the violin under Mr. E. 
H. Clark's instruction. 

A houseful of happy and enthusiastic 
friends and relatives and a perfect avalanche 
of flowers marked the recital by the pupils of 
Edwin Haines Clark at Blanchard Hall Tues- 
day evening. The program was a delightful 
selection throughout and the work of his 
pupils reflects most refulgently upon Mr. 
Clark as master. The numbers consisted of 
solos, quartets, sextets and selections for or- 
chestra. The performers and members of the 
orchestra were, violins, Mmes. Charles Clark, 
Minardi, Du Deney, Misses Aylesworth, 
Shrader, Dotter, Milner, Harris, McKenzic, 
Warner, Chapin, Potter, Bridges, Robinson, 
Longley, Meek, Blanche Meek, Tripp, Hunter, 
Dalton, Green, Holbrook, Dickerson, Messrs. 
Nelson, Perry, Plummer, Wacker, Montgom- 
ery, Woollacott, Carter, Chapman; cornets, 
Misses Addie Meek, Laura Cotton, Jeff Ferris; 
trombone, Mr. Moyse; bass, Mr. Hubbard; 
cello, Roscoe Shrader; piano, Mrs. W. Jacobs; 
clarinette, James Green. 

Mrs. Orr Harkalson and Mrs. Florence 
Scarborough sang at Mrs. Mark B. Lewis's 
reception on Thursday last, at her home on 
West Seventh street. 

Mrs. Scarbokoi'uh and Miss O'Donoughue, 
Mr. Ballard and Mr. Dupuy go to Santa Ana 
to supply the musical portion of the program 
for the commencement exercises of the Orange 
County Business College, located at that 
place. 

Prof. M. S. Arevalo will have charge of 
the vocal music this afternoon from 2:30 
to 4:30 at the graduation exercises of the 
orphans' asylum on Boyle Heights. Those 
participating are Prof. Arevalo and pupils, he 
having had the conduct of this department 
for the past twelve years. 




.ex.. 



That highly intellectual and progressive 
organization, the Ruskin Art Club, recently 
elected officers for the ensuing year, as follows: 
President, Mrs. S. C. Hubbell; vice-pre?ident, 
Mrs. W. E. Dunn; second vice-president, Mrs. 
H. G. Brainard; recording secretary. Mrs. 
Morris Albee; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
W. J. Washburn; librarian, Miss Jette Gam- 
sen; chairman of the hospital committee, Mrs. 
Granville MacGowan; chairman of the house 
committee, Mrs. C. E. Day; chairman of the 
membership committee, Mrs. W. J. Washburn ; 
committee on course of study, Mrs. A. E. Wad- 
leigh. 



Mrs. E. T. Stimson of West .Adams street 
gave a handsomely appointed lunch party on 
Monday, compl imentary to Mrs. Victoria 
Harrell. The decorations were in Cyrano red 
and green, carried out in escabiolas and 
ferns, for the Moral part, — while scarfs of 
maidenhair chiffon, edged with ferns, and 
satin ribbons were used in connection with 
the Bohemian vases at either end and the tall, 
branching silver candelabrum, skirted in red. 
Bieque cupids were at each cover, and the en- 
tire setting was charmingly striking and pic- 
turesque. To meet Mrs. Harrell were: Mmes. 
Edward Silent, W. A. Barker, W. B. Cline, R. 
G. Bundrem, J. T. Jones, John Norton, Othe- 
man Stevens, Sheldon Borden, Fred T. Grif- 
fith and Miss M. Crainard of San Francisco. 

NEW MUSIC AT BLANCHARD'S 
Vocal: "After All, W. J. McCoy; "Absence." Ar- 
thur Hype; ' Blue Kyes," Carlo Minetti; u Brin<: Her 
A^ain to Me," Frank Seymour Hastings. 

Instrumental: "At the Sake," op 82, No. 1, S. 
Camillo Entile; ''Andante Tranquillo." op. 21, No. 1, 
Howard Brockway; "Alia Tarontetti," Henry Holdcn 
Huss; "Alia Zinjara," Henry Holden Hubs. 



In the Gay Life 

MRS. WALTER NEWHALL, of New- 
hall Place, entertained twenty 
young ladies at progressive eucher on the 
afternoon of the twenty- third. Pink 
sweet peas, combined with fern fronds, were 
used in decoration of the rooms, and a dainty 
repast followed the games. 

Mrs. J. H. F. Peck, of the Baker Block, 
asked some thirty or more ladies on 
the afternoon of the twenty-third to meet 
the June bride, Mrs. Guy Cochran, nee 
Cowan, of San Francisco, and also to 
contest for handsome prizes in seven- 
hand eucher. The drawing rooms were 
decorated with potted plants and ferns and 
vaseB of sweet pease, in delicate pink tones. 
First prize, Dresden plate, Miss Clemens; sec- 
ond prize, Dresden rose jar, Mrs. Scott; con- 
solation, card case of leather and filigree, Miss 
Lila Fairchild. 

Mrs. Ira 0. Smith, of West Adams 
street, gave a large hearts party on 
the afternoon of the twenty-fourth, in 
honor of Miss Minnie Gai diner, ask- 
ing all the buds and debutantees — a com- 
pany of the fairest girls. The decorations 
were very beautiful throughout the house, 
such roses and carnations surely never 
bloomed before. Delicate pea blossoms lent 
their mass of color, and ribbons and a frieze 
of asparagus were also features' of the arrange- 
ment in which each room bore its individual 
color. First prize, spangled gauze fan in 
white, Miss Margaret Lee; second, framed 
picture of the Madonna, Miss Hattie Milner; 
consolation, box of confitures, Miss Mary 
Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Busch gave a picnic and 
luncheon to a number of their young friends 
at Rubio Canyon on Sunday last. 

Captain and Mrs. J. N. Norton have been 
entertaining Mrs. G. C. Smith, wife of Colonel 
Smith, chief quartermaster Department of 
Missouri. 

Mrs. O. W. Childs, of Hoover street, has 
had as her guests for the past two weeks her 
father and mother, Senator and Mrs. William 
B. Bate of Tennessee. These distinguished 
visitors have been the honore's at a number of 
particularly elegant and enjoyable entertain- 
ments during their stay in Los Angeles, partly 
owing no doubt to their prominent position 
in Washington circles, as well as to their 
gracious and hospitable daughter, who has 
resided here since her marriage. Mrs. Bate 
was entertained at luncheon on the twenty- 
second by Mrs. Emeline Childs of South Main 
street, and the evening of the same day Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas A. Lewis of Figueroa street 
gave them a delightfully planned dinner. On 
the twenty-third, Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. 
Cline of South Grand avenue gave a dinner of 
fourteen covers, and the following night Mrs. 
Childs Jr. asked eight gentlemen to meet her 
father. The dining room was brilliant in 
reds and greens on the occasion of this stag 
dinner, tiny electric bnlbs of scarlet being in- 
troduced into the curtain of ferns over the 
table. A rustic basket of geraniums, and 
bows of crimson satin accorded well with 
damask, silver and glass. About the board 
were assembled Mr. O. W. Childs and Senator 
Bate, of course, and Judge Roes, Judge Well- 
born, Doctor Ainsworth, Judge Shankland, 
Mr. Slauson, Mr. Hugh Macneil and Walter 
B. Cline. On the twenty sixth, Senator and 
Mrs. White of Main street invited eighty 
guests to a musicale complimentary to Senator 
and Mrs. Bate. The drawing rooms were in 
red and green, carnations and ferns appearing 
en masse on mantel and in bouquets. In the 
dining room yellow tapers burned in Bilver 
candelabra, and golden marguerites, palms 
and ferns fcrmed a pretty mellow effect. De- 
lightful numbers were furnished by Mrs. W. 
I). Larrabee, Mrs. W. F. Botsford, Mrs. J. J. 
Shallert, Miss Mollie Adelia Brown, Miss Lil- 
lian Scanlon, Messrs. Russell H. Ballard and 



C. C. Angeloty. On Tuesday Mrs. Bate met a 
pleasant party of ladies at luncheon at her 
daughter's table, Mesdames S. M. White, Em- 
eline Childs, C. C. Carpenter, Wilbur Parker, 
Dan McFarland, J. F. Conroy, T. A. Lewis 
and N. F. Wilshire forming the guests. Mrs. 
Annie Bancroft arranged the flowers and dec- 
orations, and they were truly lovely. Silver 
candelabra and electric lights were rose- 
shaded, and balls of La France roe.es were 
suspended from a canopy of ferns over the 
round table. A cut glass bowl of pink blos- 
soms rested on a handsome centerpiece, and 
carnations and hydrangeas blended charm- 
ingly with the background of green. The 
walls were hung with a living tapestry of aB- 
paragus, ferns and English ivy, with long 
sprays of the pasha flora — blossom starred 
with the brilliant flower. Pretty little bon- 
bon boxes, decorated in Dragon designs, also 
served as name cards. On Wednesday Mr. 
and Mrs. J. F. Conroy of West Thirtieth 
street asked the Bates and Childs to dinner, 
and the distinguished Tennesseean and Mrs. 
Bates were otherwise remembered, for their 
sojourn here has been an ovation from first 
to last. 

Amon<; noted society people and golfers 
who will summer at the Doria, Santa Monica, 
are Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Foster and Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles F. Monroe. 

Mrs. J. S. Owens, accompanied by her 
charming little daughter, arrived here from 
New York on Monday and is at present the 
guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Hance. Mrs. Owens will soon go to South 
Santa Monica, where she has a cottage, for the 
summer. 

Mrs. Modini-Wood returned from San 
Francisco a few days ago and is at her cottage 
on Ocean avenue, Santa Monica. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Truman and Miss Tru- 
man have taken up their residence for the 
summer at the Fred Eaton cottage on Ocean 
avenue. 

Mrs. Harry Wyatt, who has been enjoying 
an agreeable eastern visit, has returned home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jay Waters, who were 
married in this city some three weeks ago, 
have returned from their bridal trip and are 
at the Westminster. 

"Rosk Purity Spring Water" is a new bid- 
der for favor, and the proprietors, Messrs. 
Lamb and Whitney, are showing good judg- 
ment in their handsome glass packages. Thn 
water has strong medicinal qualities, but is 
free from foreign taste and is cool and clear, 
just as it bubbles from the ground at High- 
land (ilen. Telephone, Sub. 10, for a trial 
gallon. 



l Vevoty 



Is H 

"fiard-JMan" 



Competent Judges say 



Co Match 



f>ardman piano * 



* the Same of the 
* 

j» SOLE \Qt NTS * 

* LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY * 

tt Phone Green 1444 313 S. Broadway. * 

* * 



r 



SGnRflMSBERG 

...WINE5... 

The Host Famous of California 

Light, Delicate Wines, 




IC COAIT AQIN1R 



Sherwood & Sherwood 



],<m AiikcIch 



Him I'rnneiflio 



Portland 



Western Graphic 




Grace Lauberstaeimer Philo I.. Lindlcy M. Keturah Paul Neva lies Belle Chadsey Edward Calder 

Carl K. Tufts Helen Kate North Harry A. Walton Ella Eason Jouatban D. Bowler Perley Hulbcrt 

Florence Field Genevieve Hamlin Florence Dodge Heleu McCallum Alice Retzer Beatrice M. Snow 

Earl C. Anthony Rowena J. Moore Roy I'. Hillmau Samuel U Kreider Arthur McComb Grace Barnett 




Chas. I.istenwaltcr MirsHoyt Ida fherey ArUmr f. V,V B lit 

Bessie Neikckeu Bert Thomas Robert Ed n ards Florence Field 

Augustus Jackson Claire Matlock Marian Snow Ollie Cauuter Philo Lindley 

Daisy Harrison Genevieve Knoll James Case John Lashbiooke 



Western Graphic 



9 





Agnes Stephens 
Agnes White 
Donald Irvin 
Lulu Hull 



Clarence J. Shults 
Clara Wright 
Pearl King 
Merick Reynolds 



Helen Reynolds 
Leo Gibson 
Max Enderlein 
Jennie Freeman 



Gertrude Young 
William Yarnell 
Hugh Neubart 
Stella Schmidt 



Ethel Magee 
Mary Putnam 
Martha Hurnerin 
Zella /.. Fay 



William Hunter 
Elsie Hnlway 
Guy Stewart 
Clinton Judy 





Earl C. Anthony 
Lena Turner 



Florence Norton 
Wheeler 0. North 



Nellie Winters 
Opal McClcarv 
Arthur Wright 
T. Jackson Dougla 



Lcnn Turner 

Wheel ei Nor'h 
i»abeiia Denkei 
Hilary WUom 



John l.oshbrooko 
Kdlth Phillip* 
Oiicoe Brooks 
Florence Norton 



to 



Western Graphic 




ii 



SANTA MONICA 
L^^Jf^HERE is a general movement to- 
ward this place, many of the cot- 
tagers already having arrived and 
many more coming tomorrow, the 
first, most of whom will stay two months and 
not a few until October. The Hotel Arcadia 
veranda shows quite a gathering of Los An- 
geles folks each evening, and next week there 
will be about fifty arrivals. 

There will be lots of golf from now on, 
both at the town links and at the Southern 
Club links a mile or two from the car terminus 
at South Santa Monica. Everybody is in for 
golf this year, and among these is my old 
friend Waring, with whom I had a long con- 
versation a day or two ago, as follows: 

"Mr. E. C. Maud is now by common con- 
sent the best player in Southern California. 
The reason for this is that — apart from having 
strength and a good eye — he plays in good 
form. His stance is very firm and steady. 
He does not swing back very far, but he fol- 
lows the stroke right through. No other 
player here follows through as well as he does. 
He does not get up on his left toe — a question- 
able proceeding. His drive is a very taking 
one, leaving the tee at a low trajectory, with 
the whole force of the body behind it. 

"It is true he went down before Mr. J. H. 
Nicoll, a young player. Golf is a game of 
surprises, and such things will happen on the 
best regulated links. It was no disgrace, how- 
ever, to be beaten by Mr. Nicoll who, in 
this match and also the one with Mr. Wood — 
in which an extra hole had to be played — 
played a remarkably fine game. He has a 
nice easy swing and will make a good player. 

"Mr. E. D. Tufts — an imperturbable and 
good solid player — was, however, too much 
for him when they met in the semi-finals. 

"Mr. Tufts eventually played off with the 
alternate winner and thoroughly deserved his 
position of second. 

"Another surprise was the defeat of the 
Los Angeles champion, Mr. E. Conde Jones, 
by Mr. E. I). Silent in the first round. 

"Mr. Conde Jones drives like Jehu — it waB 
the driving competition — and is a good all 
round player, but this was not one of his 
days. 

"Mr. J. E. Brown of Hemet is another 
good player. He started in badly, having to 
play an entire hole in the first round, but re- 
covered his game and easily defeated Mr. J. E. 
Cook. He then met Mr. W. H. Young, the 
alternate winuer. This was a close and excit- 
ing match throughout, resulting in a tie. The 
customary extra hole was won by Mr. Young 
by one putt. 

"Mr. Brown played the game in Scotland 
and understands it. He is a very good ap- 
proacher. It was certain that Mr. Young 
would eventually win a tournament — he has 
not played in many here — as he is a sound, 
steady player, and thoroughly understands 
the game. The Ocean Park links 6uit him, 
because the game has to be played on them. 
There is a topped approach — shot will not 
roll up to the hole as is the case at nearly all 
the other links in Southern California. 



"In playing the forty-five holes necessary 
to win Mr. Young made only one bad attempt 
at a drive and that one did not get him into 
much trouble. 

"Mr. Maud won the handicap from scratch; 
and everyone was glad that Mr. R. H. H. 
Chapman — who is an all round good sports- 
man — took second prize. 

"In the ladies' handicap Mrs. Silent, who 
received a handicap of five, made the actual 
lowest score, 57. Mrs. Silent played beauti- 
fully; and was closely pressed by Mrs. War- 
ing and Mrs. Foster, the two scratch players, 
who went round together, making the respec- 
tive scores of 58 and 59. 

"Mrs. G. Wiley Wells made a great im- 
provement in this tournament and did very 
well." 

men's match play 
First round— W. H. Young beat M. G. 
Burmester, 3 up and 2 to play; E. D. Silent 
beat E. Conde Jones, 1 up; J. E. Brown beat 
R. H. H. Chapman, tie, 1 up; J. E. Cook beat 
Lee Chambers, 4 up and 2 to play; C. E. Maud 
beat H. P. Anderson, 4 up and 3 to play; J. 
H. Nicoll beat R. J. C. Wood, tie, 1 up; Guy 
Cochran beat J. D. Foster, 2 up and 1 to play ; 
E. D. Tufts beat M. E. Flowers, 4 up and 3 to 
play. 

Second round — W. H. Young beat E. D. 
Silent, 2 up and 1 to play; J. E. Brown beat 
J. E. Cook, 4 up and 2 to play; J. H. Nicoll 
beat C. E. Maud, 3 up and two to play; E. D. 
Tufts beat Guy Cochran, 4 up and 3 to play. 

Semi-final — W. H. Young beat J. E. Brown, 
tie, one up; E. D. Tufts beat J. H. Nicoll, 6 up 
and 3 to play. 

Final (eighteen holes) — W. H. Young beat 
E. D. Tufts, 5 up and 3 to play. 

ladies' handicap 

Gross Net 
Score Hd'p Score 

Mrs. E. D Silent 57 5 52 

Mrs. G. L. Waring 58 0 58 

Mrs. J. D. Foster 59 0 59 

Mrs. Othernan Stevens 75 10 (i5 

Mrs. Upham 77 7 70 

Mrs. H. R. Warner 82 (i 7(i 

Mrs. G. Wiley Wells 02 10 82 

Miss. M. Jones 94 9 85 

Mrs. R. H. H. Chapman. . . 98 10 88 

Mrs. T. D. Connolly 98 9 89 

Miss Roberts 101 9 92 

Mrs. G. Holterhoff 104 10 04 

Miss Wilshire 105 10 95 

Mrs. W. H. Young 135 10 125 

Miss R. Newmark 10 

men's handicap 

Gross Net 
Score Hd'p Score 

C. E. Maud 87 0 87 

R. H. H. Chapman 102 10 93 

H. P. Anderson Ill 16 95 

E. Conde Jones 97 0 97 

J. E. Cook 103 4 99 

J. H. Nicol 110 10 100 

Guy Cochran 110 10 100 

E. D. Silent 110 10 100 

M. E. Flowers 109 8 101 

R. J. C. Wood 107 4 103 

M. P. Burmester 115 12 103 

G. Holterhoff 123 20 103 

L. Chambers 118 12 106 

S. P. Hunt 125 10 109 

J. D. Foster 130 10 114 

W. Robertson 13fi IS 123 



THE PRIZE WINNERS 

The prizes which were of dainty silverware 
fell to the following, players: 

Men's match play— W. H. Young (Santa 
Monica), first; E. B. Tufts (L. A. C. C), 
second. 

Men's handicap— C. E. Maud (Riverside), 
first; R. H. H. Chapman (L. A. C. C.) second. 

Ladies' handicap — Mrs. E. D. Silent (L. A. 
C C), first; Mrs. G. L. Waring (Riverside), 
second. 

Men's driving contest— E. Conde Jones. 

redondoTeach 

HE initial hop of the summer season was 
held at Redondo Saturday evening last, 



T 



SANTA MONICA 



Hotel Arcadia 




SANTA MONICA 
CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 

Room 
The Dining 
Room 



The Parlors 
I AH Look 
Toward tha Sea 

It seems to me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles blow. 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound. 
And I'd have stillness ull mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's surely where I'd like to be. 
If tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
Hut when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lots the best. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue, 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

— Eugeue Field, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 



Frank A. Miller 
"Prop. 




HOMES 

BY THE SE>fl 



Ocean 
Park 



KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Elegant beach, Water piped to tract. 
Electric light connection. Long lease, ?I0 to S25 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever Offered to secure a Santa 
Monica Home 

Ocean ftir Ocean Beach Ocean Bathing 

L. B. OSBORN, Agent 

Office, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



' •£7-^-<s7 VS^ -a? §^§^3 



% Fine Fish 



Dinners 



No tourist considers a visit to California 
complete until he has visited Santa Monica and 
no one seeking a Summer Resort thinks of over- 
looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ex- 
tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, 
mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc., which are to be 
obtained at the famous restaurant, overlooking 
/ the ocean. 

) THE PAVILION 

j ECKERT & HOPF, Props. 
• ^v- ^? ^ ^ 



# 
w 

w 
w 



The North Beach 
Bath House 



Has perfected an arrangement by 
which the water in the plunge will be entirely 
changed daily. This year a great deal of money 
has been put into permanent improvements in 
and around the bath house and it will be the 
aim of the management to cater to the best class 
of people, by providing eyery thing for their 
comfort and convenience. We may say to our 
old patrons that they will hardly recognize the 
place on account of changes for the better. 



Western Graphic 



11 



and each Thursday and Saturday evening 
hereafter the orchestra will be stationed in 
the ball room and will furnish music for 
dancing. The Saturday dances are extremely 
popular with the Los Angeles society people, 
many of whom come down Saturday of each 
weed to remain over Sunday. 

Among those who spent Sunday here last 
week were: Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Nevin, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. G. Mosin, Mr. and Mrs. Walter New- 
hall, Mr. and Mrs. W S.Porter, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. E. Dunn, M. L. Graff, who, joined by Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Solano and Mr. and Mrs. 
Pridham, formed a pleasant party at dinner, 
a'.long table being especially arranged and 
decorated in honor of the occasion. The ball 

SANTA CATAL1 N A ISLAND 



ftama caiaima island 



Three and one-lialf hours from Los Angeles 

The Greatest Resort 

The Loveliest Season of the Year 

Climate near Perfection 

Phenomenal Fishing and Hunting 

The great Stage Ride 

Modern HOTKL 

a,™»,„™ METROPOLE 



i 

\ 



% 



Unique exclusive attractions 

The Famed Marine Gardens as viewed 

from the glass bottomed boats 
The best and most picturesque Golf Links 
Round trip everyday from Los Angeles 
Sunday'excursions, three hours on the island 
See R. R. time tables 

For full information, illustrated pamphlets and 
rates apply to 



Tel. M 36 



BANNING CO. 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 



< 4yn.4V^. < 4vn.<4yn. '^n. < *^-. ^ns* 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 

Hotel jdst Completed 




Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 

& u Bath house in connec- ^ 

Rates S3 to «4 a day 3§S§ tion with hotel. Finest £ 

Sneeial rates on Sife beach and surf bathing on V 

annl cation HI coast ' Golf links ' y acht - A 
application ^ fishin ^ Ten mi)ea of 8j 

SP Andpr^nn '4'£i tine roadway along lieaeh 
• I . MIIUOI OUI1 for bicycling. 

Manager 5*y; 

T H6 Attractive Route j 

X 

To the Favorite Sea Side X 
Resorts is the 0 

Los Anoeles Terminal Railway 




Terminal Island, Bythesea 
Catalina Island San Pedro 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and 

most delightful places 
and only a short ride from Los Angeles, where can he 
found the finest Open Sea Bathing, Yachting and 
Fishing on the Pacific coast. 

Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket 
Office, 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. 
S. B. Hynes, Gen. Mgr. T. C. PF.cK.Gen.Agt Pass. Dept. 



room later in the evening was well filled with 
young guests of the hotel, and others, who en- 
joyed a round of two-step waltzes, and the 
opening hop was a marked success. 

Miss Margery Halstead, one of Alhamhra's 
expert golfers, was the guest of Miss Bean 
Monday, and the young ladies made several 
rounds of the links. 

There has been a general opening up of 
summer cottages this week. Col. F. H. Sey- 
mour, the wealthy mine owner and railroad 
man of Torred, Mexico, and family took pos- 
session of their handsome summer home 
Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Lewis of Los 
Angeles came down to their picturesque cot- 
tage Thursday for the summer. 

There are several Pasadenans already lo 
cated here in their summer cottages on the 
ocean front, prominent among whom are Mr. 
and Mrs. F. L. Roehrig, Dr. and Mrs. B. M. 
Page, Mrs. Gilchrist, Mrs. B. M Doane. 

Homer Laughlin, Jr., and S. M. Haskins 
were among Los Angeles men spending Sun- 
day at Hotel Redondo. 

Great preparations are being made by the 
Redondo Attraction Club for a Fourth of July 
celebration here, which will include fireworks 
and a balloon ascension. 

Miss Bertha Walby was the guest of Miss 
Sargent over Sunday. 

CORONADOBEACH 

THE past has been a charming week at 
Coronado Beach. Numerous guests 
and visitors are arriving daily, some having 
taken cottages for the summer, others enjoy- 
ing life and all the term implies at Hotel del 
Coronado. Pool, surf bathing and fishing are 
dividing honors with golf, tennis and bicycl- 
ing. The dash and go of summer is in the 
very air. 

Golf, the game at present witching the 
world, finds itself played on Coronado's splen- 
did links by many who know the kinks of the 
game thoroughly. Among devotees are the 
Misses Rossington of Chicago, Kirkby and 
Healey of Coronado, O'Connor, Spreckles and 
Mullens of San Francisco, Messrs. McKenzie 
and Newlin of Coronado, Orville Pratt and 
J. D. Spreckles, Jr., of San Francisco. 

Wednesday's afternoon game was followed 
by a dainty luncheon served at the Golf Club, 
the Misses O'Connor entertaining. 

Among the very successful fishermen 
spending a part of June at Hotel del Coro- 
nado may be noted J. D. Spreckles, E. P. 
Preslon and Orville C. Pratt of Han Francisco, 
Francis Jerrard of London, England, J. W. 
Kellogg of New York City. 

Tuna are found in pleasing number and 
excellent size in the vicinity of Coronado 
isles. The launch May with Captain Dunne 
in charge makes frequent trips to the islands. 
The two hours ocean trip is considered de- 
lightful. The new glass bottomed boat gives 
a fine chance to view marine life for those not 
on fishing bent. When tuna, the gamiest 
fish of the mackerel family, are sought none 
consider the time or labor spent. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Babcock, Capt. Charles 
T. Hinde and niece, Miss Halliday, have re- 
turned to Coronado after a six weeks eastern 
trip. 

LONG BEACH 

LONG BEACH now is at its best, the 
clear, bracing sunshiny days being just 
the thing for boating, bathing, driving or 
walking on the beautiful beach, whose hard 
level sands are the delight and admiration of 
all who come here. 

The accessions to the pleasure fleet have 
been continuous since the opening of the sea- 
son, and it now assumes respectable propor- 
tions, there being in it several motor yachts 
and any number of sailing craft ami rowboats 
The rowboats are used principally in taking 
parties out to the fishing banks at deep water, 
the fishing out there with rod and reel afford- 
ing great sport. Some big catches are being 
made every day of barracuda and yellowtail, 
the gamey fish biting at the trolling hooks 
most voraciously, the excitement of getting 
them aboard affording glorious sport. 



REDONDO 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv vvvvvvvvv vv vvv 

* 




* 

* ONLY THIRTY MINUTKS 

* FROM LOS ANGELES 



mm® i 




* Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



j» 
f 
*» 
*» 

3» 
J> 
3» 

3 
J» 
J» 
J» 
J» 

& 
3» 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 

Frequent <iolf and Tennis Tourn- 
aments. 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 



Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 



Transient Kates .*•>..->() to * I . 



j, Special Weekly Kates 



H. R. WARNER, Pkop 



*«lt««A<l«*A«**«t««*lt«ltll*llAltA*lt**ll**A 




\ 

Santa Fe Route J 



Summer Time Table 



Daily SbbVICK 
Leaves I-os Angeles 9.66 a.m. 1.30 p.m. 5.86 p. m 
Arrives at Redondo lu.35a. m, 2.10 p.m. 6.10 p. m 

SlNDAY Bkryicb 
Leaves Los Angeles s.:to a. m. 0.66 a. m. 

1 .:I0 p. in. 6.35 p. m. 
Arrives at Redondo !U0a. m. 10.35 n. m. 

2.10 p. m. 6.10 p. in. 
Last Train Returning Leaves Redondo 



.00 p. m. 



7 10 p. m. 

\00 p.m. 



Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



• * -4 -4 + * -4 4 * 4 *4 4 -4 I 

I Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. f 



Time Card 



In eircct June I. IS99. © 

DopOt eor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 
Every day 9.80 a m 1.80 p m 
Sundays 8. In a 111 0.30 a in 
1 .30 p m 6.30 n m 
Trains leave Redondo for Los Angeles 
Everyday 8.00km ll.OOam 
Sundays 7.00 a tu 8.00 a m 
11.00 a in LIS p in 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Kedondo r> 30 p 
returning leaves' Lob Angelc< 11.30 p m 

Ci : y Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main |i 

J L. J. PERRY, Superintendent 



5.30 p 111 
10.45 a in 
7.00 p. in 

4.15 p in 
9.80 a m 
5. 15 p m 



BUINDY'S 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottnges Lighted by Acety- 
lene ({as. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



l Elsinore 
Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z. BUN D Y, Prop 

Rates per week— 88, $9, and 810, Inelud- ELSINORL- 

lng Hot Sulphur Ruths. No Con- fkl 

sumptlves taken : : : ; V//\L. 



12 




Western Graphic 
Cable pleasures 



AN American woman would grow gray- 
headed in a month if she attempted to 
keep house in Mexico on the same plan pur- 
sued by the native housewives. There are no 
watermains in the average town and water 
for domestic purposes is drawn from the pub- 
lic fountains and sold from door to door by 
leather-aproned venders who carry it in pic- 
turesque vessels of hide or pottery. Pulque 
and milk are brought to market in skins of 
sheep, pigs and goats, which are stripped off 
the animal carcass by cutting only the neck 
and legs and turned inside out t all the open- 
ings but one being tied up securely. The na- 
tives do not object to the flavor of goat-hide 
and swine-skin in the milk, but visitors do. 

The washerwomen have no faith in mod- 
ern methods. They get twenty-five cents a 
day and are satisfied. This sounds improba- 
ble to those of us who have "not been there," 
who are being "done up" by our laundress 
and have to endure it. The washerwomen all 
do their work beside an open stream of water 
in a trough of stone or wood, beating the arti- 
cles with a round stone, a piece of home-made 
soap and their strong hands. No hot water is 
used. The scene at the public washing houses 
is an interesting one. The method breaks 
buttons, bends buckles and tears goods with 
the same ease as does a steam laundry in our 
midst. 

The average Mexican cook is as primitive 
as the washerwoman. No matter how many 
times the use of a modern cook-stove were ex- 
plained to her it is probable that she would 
build the (ire in the oven and put the bread 
to bake in the fire box. What she would use 
is called the brasero. Among the poor this 
is an urn-shaped affair of pottery with a hol- 
low base, where a tiny charcoal fire may be 
kept alive by constant fanning, the whole be- 
ing not much larger than a common flower- 
pot. In the homes of the upper classes the 
brasero is built in of brick, mortar and piles, 
its surface is as high as an American cook- 
stove with holes a foot square under each of 
which a charcoal fire is kept burning. Some 
of these stoves have twenty-five or thirty 
opens, and the operation of cooking is so 
laborious that the cook has a relay of assis- 
tants to prepare the vegetables, wash the 
dishes and attend the fires. 



COST OF A DINNER 

Recently a gentleman who is fond of 
arithmetic made up his mind that he would 
find out how much a dinner really cost. This 
gentleman asked how much a simple dinner 
that he was eating cost and he was told sev- 
enty-five cents. 

He contradicted this and then made out 
the following statement about the cost of that 
dinner: The pepper, he said, came from 10,000 
miles away. It grew on a little bush about 
eight feet high, which must have had a growth 
of at least five years. The pepper was picked 
green; it had to be dried in the sun, and this 
meant employing women. It took one ship 
and 1,000 miles of railroad to bring 
the pepper to the United States. The flour 
of which the bread was made came from Min- 
neapolis or Stockton; some one owned the 




land and that meant the investing oi capital, 
and then he had also to pay wages to work- 
ingmen. The flour had to be ground and the 
building of the mill and the plant, or ma- 
chinery, meant more money invested. The 

SUNDAY, JULY 2. 

BREAKFAST 

Per.cbes and Cream 
Oatmeal Mush 
Beefsteak ami Onions 
Scrambled Eggs 
French Rolls and Coffee 

DINNER 

Tomato Soup 
Boiled Ocean Trout 
Fried Chicken with Oysters 
Mashed Potatoes Creamed Turnips 

Lettuce French Dressing 

Tapioca Custard 
Coffee 

SUPPER 

Shrimp Salad ' 
Brown Broad and Butter and Beer 
Escalloped Oysters 
Sliced Peaches 
(That have been sugared and put in ice chest in the 
morning.) 

Coffee Cheese Crackers 

A MODERATE MEN V FOR ANY WEEK DAY— BREAKFAST 

Fruit 

Shredded Biscuit Sugar and Cream 

Broiled Bacon Creamed Potatoes 
Rice Muffins Coffee 



LUNCH 

Tomato Omelet 



Orange Short Cake 



Tea 



DINNER 

Tomato Soup 
Calf's Liver, Larded and Baked 
Mashed Potatoes Spinach 
Celery Mayonnaise 
Wafers Cheese 
Peach Pudding 
Coffee 

A SWELL CLUB BREAKFAST 

Eastern Oysters on Halfshell 
Sauterne 
Pompano a la Bob Eckert 
Lamb Chops 

Burgundy 
Rum Omelet 
Champagne 
Cheese Coffee 



Crackers 



Cigars 



A MODERATE CLUB DINNER 

Oysters on Halfshell 
Cream of Chicken Soup 
Olives Lettuce 
Turkey, Cranberry Sauce, Giblet Gravy 
Layer Cake Ice Cream 

Wines Fruit 
Coffee 



( 'lu'OKC 



Cigars 



LATE CLUB SUPPER 

Manhattan Cocktail 
Oysters on Halfshell 
Porterhouse Steak and Baked Potatoes 
Spanish Omelet 
Burgundy Coffee Cigars 

millers had to be paid, coopers had to be em- 
ployed for making the barrels, and, of course, 
the wood of which the barrels were made had 
to be cut and sawed and shaped, and this 
meant the employing of more men. Then 
the flour had to be shipped over the railroad 
and handled again by cartment before itcame 
into the house. 

The tea on the table came from China or 
Japan and the coffee from Central America. 
The codfish had to be brought from Massa- 



chusetts or Maine Men had to lie employed 
to catch the fish; other men and wo;nen arard 
employed in drying, packing and boxing it 
and it, too, had to make a long railroad 
journey. 

The salt came from Iodio or Syracuse. 
The spices in the cake came from the Spice is- 
lands in the Indian archipelago. The pickles 
and preserves came from London and they, too, 
represented the employment of capital and 
labor. The little dinner represented, directly 
or indirectly, the employment of $500,000,000 
of capital and 5,000,000 men. Had he been 
compelled to have had everything for his din- 
ner prepared and shipped to order the repast 
would have co.-t him .$100,000. 

Lots of men who have an aim in life lack 
ambition. 



REST A I L MARKETS. SATURDAY, JULY 1 



MEATS AND SAl'SAOES 

Prime Rib Roast 15c Tenderloin 15(3. 18c 

Leg of Mutton 124c Sirloin 15c 

Hind (Quarter Lamb.. .$1. 25 Round. . . 124c 

Fore " '• 75c M utton Chops 124c 

Pork Loir. R< ast I2J<- Lamb chops 2oe 

Pork Sausage 124c Pork Ch"pa 121 (3) 15c 

Hamburger " Corned Beef 8(3|10e 

Bologna " Salt Pork 10(a)12Jc 

Weinerwurst " Ham, best 12c 

Liverwurst " Bacon, best 12c 

Porterhouse 22 J to 250 Lard 12Jc 

POULTRY, FISH AND GAME 

Broilers 40(3 65c Rock Cod, lb 10c 

Fryers 50(«$65c Cockles, lb 2@3c 

Roasters 70c Shrimps, lb 15c 

Hens 40@65c Roe, lb 10c 

Ducks 60c Kaslem <);. sters.qt 60c 

Turkeys, lb 20c Morgan Oysters, qt 65c 

(ieese. lb 20c Halibut, ll> 8@l0c 

Squab, pair 36c Yellowtail.lb 8@10c 

Sea Bass, lb 10c Salmon, lb 15(3. 20c 

Shad, lb 15c Crab«,each 20@25c 

Baracuda, lb 10c Clams, lb 2(3)3c 

BUTTER, EOOS AND CHEESE 

Butter, best, roll 55c Pineapple. 41 lb 85c 

" tub, lb 25c " small 45c 

Fggs, doz 20c Soft French Cream 10c 

Cheese. California 20c Sierra 10c 

Cheese, Martins, N.Y...20c German Breakfast 5c 

Imoorted Swiss 35c Ohio Swiss 25" 

VEGETABLES 

Potatoes, lb 24c String beans, lb 5c 

Sweet potatoes, lb 5c Cabbage, per head 5c 

Cueunib TS.each 10c Onions, lb 24c 

Egg Plant, lb 10c Turnips, bunch 5c 

Radishes, bunch 24c Beets, bunch 5c 

Tomatoes, lb 10c Cauliflower, bunch 10c 

Green Peppers lb 10c Mushrooms, lb 40c 

Carrots, bunch 5c Asparagus, lb 74c 

Peas, lb 5c 'Watercress, bunch 5c 

Lettuce, bunch 24c Mint, bunch 5c 

Artichokes, doz 30c Summer squash, lb 74c 



FRUITS \ 

Apples, fancy, II) He 

Apples, cooking, lb...0(3.Kc 

Oranges, per doz 10(gt20 

Fancy Navels " 25(«|50 

Tangerines 10(g) 20 

Limes, doz 15c 

Lemons, doz 10@15c 

Honolulu Bananas, doz 25c 

Rhubarb, lb 3@4c 

<irape fruit, each 5c 

Eng. Walnuts lb 124c 

Almonds, lbs 15(3)25 

Pecans, lb 15c 

Mixed nuts, lb 15c 



ND NUTS 

Strawberries, box 5(3) 15c 

Blackberries lb 10ftal64 

Raspberries, lb 10(3' 15c 

Logan berries, 1 b 10(a) 15c 

Cherries, lb ldot 15c 

Loquats, lb 74c 

Guavas, box 5c 

Figs, lb 2.">(<>30c 

Apricots, lb 10c 

Currants, lb 15c 

Gooseberries, lb 5(3) 15c 

olives, quart 25(3i40c 

Pineapples, each 35(3)65e 

Cocoanuts, each' 10c 




&LMS 

Detective 
flQency 



Will undertake all legitimate Detective work intrusted 
to it by KHilroads or Corporation*, Itimkx, Hrr- 
oantlle Houses, Attorneys Private, IndiTldnala 

Special facilities for operating in the East and abroad 

Very b« st of references n C i~_ «... 

Tel. Mam r,i8 JnO. P. ElluS, Principal 

Rooms 112-113-142 Wilson Block, Los Angeles 



LADIES Jt & 

Hmvc your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Chemist 

2**- JtJtPrice 50 cts 

North Main Street 



Western Graphic 



13 




}5muscmcnts 



HARRY WYATT has promised the people 
of Los Angeles Sarah Bernhardt this 
year or the one after. It is worth living for, 
for Sarah Bernhardt is the greatest actress 
that ever lived. The writer has seen this 
magician of mimicry in "Frou Frou," "Ca- 
mille, "Feodora" and "La Tosca." Just 
eight years ago he accompanied Mr. and Mrs. 
Jevne to a Chicago theater and saw the great 
French actress in the latter play. The charm 
of her artistic personality is felt from the first 
to the last. The wonderful voice, the faultless 
delivery of the lines, whether expressing the 
tenderness of love or the consuming fire of 
hatred and revenge, the amazing play of 
facial expression, never swerving a single in- 
stant from the situation, perfect everywhere 
in application, alike in the grace and light- 
ness of the opening scenes, in the tense hor- 
ror of the torture scene, and in the moment 
of swift and blasting vengeance, in all alike, 
the genius of the artist — that blending of the 
eensitive capacity to conceive with the amaz- 
ing power to embody conception in expression 
— places before the auditor with a potency 
not to be described in words. In the power 
to seem absorbed in the impersonation, with 
utter ignoring of the presence of any save the 
dramatis persona', Bernhardt is unquestion- 
ably without a peer in our time, and has 
probably not been surpassed in any time on 
any stage. 

Beginning with the light of a happy love 
illuminating every smile and breathing in 
every tone of the voice, passing hence into the 
tortures of jeaiousy, and thence swiftly lifted 



to love and trust again; thence plunged into 
measureless grief and agony till she in spite 
of herself hetray's her lover's secret; then 
struck suddenly with an annameable horror 
yet resolving to sacrifice all for her lover's 
safety, a boundless despair whence she es- 
capes through sudden bloody vengeance, only 
to be plunged at last into hopelessness and 
death — to depict these is the task, and they 
pass across the mobile face with bewildering 
celerity and intensity — every sound in every 
tone of the voice from the moment when every 
spoken syllable is a caress to that in which it 
harshens and breaks in desperate terror and 
horror. One can scarcely conceive that it is 
the same face, the same voice, seen and heard 
within such narrow space of time wearing 
such measurelessly separated meanings. The 
marvelous feature of it all, perhaps, is the 
celerity and the unerring accuracy of the 
transitions. One may be disposed to find 
artificiality in the extreme care shown in the 
details of placing the candles at the head and 
the crucifix on the breast of the beast Scarpia 
after she has killed him, and it is one of the 
strange things of the human mind that in 
moments of supreme trial itsiezes tenaciously 
on little things, and the habits of a lifetime, 
and of heredity from countless progenitor^ 
like the habit of a religion of observances in 
this woman, assert themselves automatically. 
It is all a marvelous display of insight and of 
power that reaches to every height nor 
disdains to finish in the first degree every 
trifle. 

"La Tosca" is a play designed to afford 
Bernhardt an opportunity to display her tre- 
mendous intensity, her marvelous power of 
expressing in the minutest detail and without 
the suspicion of what is called rant the fierc- 
est passions that torture and disfigure hu- 
manity. It is a marvel of structural skill in 



the delineation of the worst side of the worst 
type of humanity, merely touching a belter 
side in order to deepen the shading of the bad. 

But it is in "Camille" and "Frou Frou" 
that Bernhardt made her best impression. 
We believe she could pack the Los Angeles 
theater six nights with the latter play, as no 
person could resist going to see her in this 
tremendously popular and familiar play. 
Her acting in the third, fourth and fifth acts 
can never be described — only two other act- 
resses have in the least approached her — 
Matilda Heron and Clara Morris — and these 
were way behind. 

The great Frenchwoman is now playing 
Hamlet in Paris; and, according to French 
papers, she is in perfect health and, notwith- 
standing the stock jokis about her thinness, 
her bones, which are small, are well covered 
with flesh as pink and sound as that of a 
prize-fighter when he is in training. Yet in 
her girlhood Sarah had hard times. Her 
father was a faggot gatherer and when he had 
a leisure hour he invariably employed it in 
beating his two children. Finally the elder 
sister ran away to escape ill treatment, took 
up with a young man and was heard of no 
more. Bernhardt pere had then only one 
daughter to beat, but he gave her a double 
thumping. What little life was left in the 
girl at last rebelled. At the age of 14 Sarah 
was clothed in rags and covered with bruises, 
her dinner of crusts, her bed some boughs in 
the corner of the hut. Her father beat his 
record one day in beating her and she went 
out to seek her fortune, believing that if she 
would be no better off she could be no worse 

A gay young artist was sketching in the 
woods that day, when this slender thing of 
shreds and patches and bruises came up be- 
side his easel and looked wistfully at him. 

"I want to go to Paris, or anywhere," she 
said. "Will you take me?" 

"Take you! "he cried, in astonishment, 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 



Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 



Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- | Make fine halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair I newspaper cuts— just any hing you want en- 
Goods of all kinds. Thy Crk.mk i.k Acvcia Braved. See them at the Times Building, Lou 
Skin food. 224-226 W. SECOND Sr. i Angeles. 



Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for .John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
I.ager Beers on draught at all principal saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited, l'hone M 468 



Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chafin & Fabricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re- 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazines, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115^ N. Main St., Los ANGELES 



House Cleaning 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, ."ic per window, Sl.'iOday 
25c per hour. 608 S. Broadway. Geo. Tanabi 



Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

Arc made at Plaza Photo Callery at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
penses and can give you your money's worth. 
PI.AZA (iAI.I.KKY, 513 N. Main. 



Carriage Works 

A. I. 



LIKE 



Real Estate 

" Muync IIimIh the- bargains ' 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 



Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc., made to order. 800-H02 A Spring 
and S01-8O3 S. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rags. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 611 South Broadway, l'hone M. 217 
Bobt. Jordan 



Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. TuraD St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 



Leading Heal I -i.ii, 

118 West Focrtii St. 



A gen t ■ 

Los Anoki.es 



Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped In Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halftone and photo-chrome 
printing a specialty. 

311-313 New High, St. - - Los Anoki.kn 



Veterinary Surgeon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital, 627 South Main 
street Telephone's: Main 1152. White 2131. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours: 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

40% S. SPRINO St. • - Los Anoei.es 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

91.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
l Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 8. Broadway. 



Wines 

TRY OCR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. FRKK. DELIVERY 
Southern California Wink Co. 220 West 
4th ct.^Los Angeles. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and ]>erfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 5c a roll 

Gilts 7>4c " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shados 25c each 

WALTER BR05. 



Oldest and Largest Hank in Southern 
California 

Farmers <t Merchants Bank 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) (MX) ,000 

SUBPLOT AND REHERVK 926,742 



Total $1,426,742 

OFFICKKH 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HKI. L.MAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLF.ISH M AN Caabiei 

(i. HKIMANN Assistant Cashiei 




DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Clause!) 

0. W. Chllds I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Franeis II W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

4^-Speclal Collection Department Onrsafcty 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent In its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which Is the strongest, best guarded and ban 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

[unction of Main. Spring and Temple SU. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SI HSCRIBKD $200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQITE rZ^TZTT. President 

1. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-Pronldent 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors — H, W. Hellman. Rasper Colin, 11. 
W O'Mclvenv. .1. I! I. linker'. hi 111. 1 1. T Johnson, 
T. L. Du<|iie, L N. VM Nuys, W. (i. KerekhotT, A. 
Ilajui 

Park Market 

OBAM. KKSTNKK. Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone Kcd t»2r> 



u 



Western Graphic 



"Mon Dieu! I don't make enough money to 
support myself. It is impossible." 

Then the girl began that coaxing coquet- 
tishness in which she is now expert and fin- 
ally the artist consented. Away went the 
strange pair to Paris. After a week or two 
the artist was turned out in the streets by his 
landlord and Sarah had to shift for herself. 
She was rescued by the sisters of a convent 
and, after more wonderful adventures than 
ever befel Sinbad, she was accepted as a pupil 
at the Comedie Francaise. Since that aus- 
picious day Sarah Bernhardt has had no 
troubles that were not of her own making, and 
she is now at the height of her powers, her 
fame and her marvelous health. Sarah firmly 
believes she will die of consumption, but count 
less numbers of her present admirers shall 
have made their final exist long before the 
curtain falls on the greatest actress of any 
time. 

THIS WEEK'S FRONTISPIECE 

TO HAVE physical as well as facial 
beauty, a musical speaking as well aB 
singing voice, personal magnetism, the art of 
dressing attractively, and, if necessity de- 
mands, to be able to sing a "coon song" and 
even do the "cake walk," are a few of the re- 
quirements the theater-going public demand 
of an actress in these exacting days of the 
dawn of the twentieth century. 

The subject of our front page illustration 
this week, Miss Delia Stacey, is said to posses 
all these attributes, even including the "coon 
song" and "cake walk." Miss Stacey has had 
an eventful career. Born, you might say, 
during the turmoil of war and rocked in the 
craddle of the American army — for her father 
was the late Gen. Mac E. Stacey of the United 
States Army, and she spent her childhood 
days at various army posts throughout the 
country. 

Her godfather was C«en. William Tecum- 
seh Sherman, and she ha? two brothers, both 
officers in the regular army, of whom she is 
extremely proud. One is at present in Porto 
Rico and the other in the Philippines fight- 
ing for the Stars and Stripes as her father did 
in years gone by. 

After her father's death she decided on a 
professional career on the stage and obtained 
an engagement with the late Augustin Daly, 
appearing in many of the successful adapta- 
tions at his theater in New York. She was 
the "Puck" in his last grand revival of "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream." After two sea- 
sons with Daly's company she joined James 
Powers in "A Straight Tip" and later ap- 
peared with Peter Dailev in "A Country 
Sport," 

Her first visit to Los Angeles was with 
what was then the greatest comedy success of 
the time, "Charlie's Aunt." Then followed a 
season at the New York Casino. Last year 
she played the leading part "Julie Bonbon" 
in E. E. Rice's musical comedy "The Girl 
from Paris." Thus, it will be seen, her ex- 
perience has run nearly the whole gauntlet of 
the dramatic field from the sublime Shake- 
speare to the up-to-date farce comedy. Miss 
Stacey attributes her success in her chosen 
profession to the fact that she is always in- 
terested in her art and believes in doing 
whatever is alloted to her, no matter h.»w 
small the part, to the best of her ability. 
Consequently she is constantly in demand by 
responsible managers. Her reputation as an 
artistic dresser is second to none. She will be 
seen next week at the Los Angeles Theater 
with Warde and Sackett's Comedians in "A 
Bachelor's Honeymoon," and will wear some 
stunning gowns over which the fair sex will 
undoubtedly rave. 

POPULAR idols at the Orpheum this week 
are McAvoy and May, who most appro- 
priately announce their act "a crazy conglom- 
eration." McAvoy is an excruciatingly funny 
fellow in a clownish way and Miss May(when 
one don't know it is safest to say Miss) can't 
keep still long enough for people to see what 
she looks like. Houdini, the magician, has 
succeeded not only in overwhelmingly mystify- 
ing the public, but has annexed the entire 



police force to his advertising staff. Without 
doubt he is the cleverest man in the business 
today and his petite wife is a pretty assis- 
tant. 

Los Angeles Theater— There are honeymoonu and 
honeymoons, but the liveliest honeymoon that has 
come to public notice lately is John Stapleton's 
breezy farce "A Bachelor's Honeymoon," which will 
be presented at the Los Angeles Theater on Monday 
evening next by the popular players known as Warde 
and Sackett's comedians. "A Bachelor's Honey- 
moon" commenced originally at Hoyt's Theater in 
New York City last season, and kept the great metro- 
politan public in a happy humor for a number of 
weeks. It has also been seen in Philadelphia, Chi- 
cago, Washington, Denver, Minneapolis, Saint Paul, 
Detroit and various other points of the south, east 
and west, and always has been highly praised by the 
press and public and always plays to a very large 
business. Mr. Stapleton's play is strinkingly original 
in treatment and conception, the author having 
caught the happy spirit of the French and German 
farce writers in the brilliancy of his dialogue and de- 
velopment of his situations. As a laugh maker "A 
Bachelors Honeymoon" is unexcelled, and is 
strongly recommended as an antidote for the 
"bluee." 

As a dramatist, Mr. Stapleton has more than du- 
plicated his marvelous success as a manager and 
stage director, his farce "A Bachelor's Honeymoon" 
being sufficient in itself to place him in the front 
rank of modern comedy writers. "A Bachelor's Hon- 
eymoon" was a revelation to the New York crictics, 
and they were unstinted in their praises of Mr. Sta- 
pleton, even going so far as to predict a new era of 
comedy and farce through his efforts. The play sur- 
prised the crictics, chiefly because it has all the brilli- 
ancy and dash of the French school, the thoroughness 
of detail which characterizes the German and the 
bold originality of the American. " Every character 
in the farce is clearly and distinctly drawn and re- 
quires careful and skillful treatment by the actors. 
Mr. Stapleton has just completed a new farce which 
Messrs. Warde and Sackett who now control "A 
Bachelor'e Honeymoon" will produce next season. 



Orpheum — The overflowing houses enjoyed by 
the Orpheum during the current week are eloquent 
testimony to the fascinations a tine vaudeville bill 
has for the multitude. The management promises a 
continuance of the excellent acts and woll balanced 
program of the week. Four new features will be 
added to the bill next week. Houdini, the little wiz- 
ard of the handcuffs and master of illusions, is to re- 
main another week, and a number of new feats are 
promised from him. His trunk mystery will remain 
a feature of his act. 

The Phoites troupe, a European aggregation of 
pantomiinists, are among the new comers. Sacianu, 
the greatest female impersonator in the world: Fran- 
cesca Redding and Carlton Macy, in "The Duchess 
of Devonshire;." Fred Niblo, a story teller, are other 
new people. 

McAvoy and May, the tempetuous comedians, 
and the Wart en berg Bros., acrobats and musicians, 
complete the bill. 



THE END OF THE YEAR AT. ST VINCENT'S 

THE always interesting and impressive 
commencement exercises of St Vincent 
college this )'ear surpassed all previous efforts 
in variety and excellence. As usual the week 
began with a solemn mass in which Very Rev. 
J. A. Linn preached interestingly upon the 
origin, duty and destiny of man. 

In the evening the annual oratorical con- 
test for the " Father Meyer Gold Medal " was 
held in the college hall, the honor being 
awarded to Frederick L. Gilbert, who deliv- 
ered " Catiline's Defiance." George A. Le 
Doux and T. E. Stanton received honorable 
mention from the Judges, Senator Stephen M. 
White, Judge Winder, G. A. Dobinson, Jos. 
Scott, Esq., and I. B. Dockweiler. The ora- 
tions were pleasingly interspersed with mu- 
sical numbers. 

On Wednesday evening a goodly company 
assembled at the Los Angeles Theater to hear 
the production of the tragedy, " Hermigild," 
or the two crowns, by the boys of the school. 
The old Spanish play received most excellent 
treatment at the hands of the youthful Thes- 
pians. Rev. F. X. McCabe had charge of the 
drama, assisted on the last by Claude Gilbert, 
of James O'Neill's company. 

But the day of all was Friday, when the 
graduates received their diplomas and bade 
good-by to their Alma Mater. The com- 
mencement exercises were held in the Los 
Angeles Theater, where the following program 
interested the relatives and friends of the 
graduates: 
Salutatory, Master Caesar Castruccio. 
Oration, "The United States Navy," William J. 
Hanlon. 

Oration. "Imperialism," T. Elwood Stanton. 



Conferring of Degrees and Presentation of Medals. 
Address to the Graduates, John G. Mott, LL. M. 

The program was preceded and the num- 
bers alternated with music, following which 
was the presentation of medals. Degrees 
were conferred on Frederick L. Reardon, A. B. 
'97, Master of Arts ; Geo. A. Le Doux and T. 
Elwood Stanton, B. S. '98, Bachelor of Arts ; 
Edward T. Dillon, '97, and Louis J. Mesmer, 
B. S. '97, Master of Science ; Wm. A. Barn- 
hill, Wm. J. Hanlon, Philip J. Kerr, C. Urban 
Mandis, Geo. C. Sabichi and James P. Whe- 
lan, Bachelor of Science. 

Saturday evening the Alumni banquet was 
enjoyed at lllich's, where some of the old 
wheel horses of the commonwealth joined the 
young men in a pleasant evening, extending 
the hand of good fellowship and welcome to 
the work of the world. Following are the 
toasts: 

Opening Remarks. ...W. H. Workman, Jr., President 

Address Rt. Rev. Bishop Montgomery 

The President— not of the Library Board 

I. B. Dockweiler 

"They're off"— a start in life P. J. McGarry 

" Archipelagoes " Hon. E. M. Burke 

Politics by one on the inside A. W. Francisco 

The Younger Element A. P. Derkum' 

Quacks — from the barnyard Dr. C. W. Murphy 

Remarks Very Rev. J. A. Linn, C. M. 



OS ANGELES THEATER 

(C. M. WOOD .> 

\u. c. wyatt; U!S8ees 

Week Commencing Monday, .Inly 3rd 

MATINEES TUESDAY (Independence Day) and SATURDAY 

W^IME if JMtKETTI 




PRESENTING THE LATCHING FAD 

A m^miows mmrmrn 

Seats now on sale 
PRICES— SI .00, "5c, 5CC, 25c. - - - Telephone Main 70 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July 3. 

Extra Holiday Matinee Tuesday, .Inly 4th. 
The Famous Phoites, Gorgeous Spectacular Eutertainment. 
Franceses Redding, the Famous American Actress, sup- 
ported by 

Mr. Carlton Macy, in "The Duchess of Devonshire." 

Taciana, the Clever Female Impersonator. 

Fred Niblo, Refined Monologist and Parody Vocalist. 

ll 1 1 in. the Mystifier, assisted by 

Miss Heatrice liondlnt. 

McAvoy A May the Cyclonic Comedians. 

Wartenberg Brothers, Europe's Famous Novetty Stars. 

PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



Tailoring and Repairing 

Suits made to order, goods the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

II. L. Yerger, 118 West Second Street. 

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

PHYSICIANS ANI> SURGEONS 



ELIZABETH A. F0LLANSBEE 

315 SO. BROADWAY 
Rooms : 332-334 Laughlln Ituilding 



Office hours 8 to 9 a.m 
1 to 4 p.m 

Tel. Main 737 



JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN, 
Hours; 1* a.m. to 12 m., 1 to G p.m. 

H. S. 0RP1E 

116117 DOUGLAS BLDG 
Third and Spring Streets 



Tel. Main 9H. 



Tot* (Office Main fifO 
lels - (Res. Main 300 



RESIDENCE 

215 N. BUNKER HILL 



I>KN TISTS 



D. CAVE 

LANKERSEIM BLOCK 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1515 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Che palace 

A Select Family Re-ort 

Patronized by the business men of the city with 
their lamilles. Elegantly fitted, cool in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance. Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Restaurant and Refreshments 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



Western Graphic 



15 



POMONA COLLEGE AND ITS COMMENCEMENT 

AT the dedication of the handsome new 
building known as Pearson's Hall of 
Science (one of the buildings belonging to the 
group constituting Pomona College, Clare- 
mont) January 21st, 1899, Thomas R. Bacon 
of the University of California delivered an 
address entitled ''Natural Science as a Factor 
in Education.'' In the course of his remarks 
this eminent educator said: "We have had at 
the University many students who have re- 
ceived a part or the whole of their undergrad- 
uate training at Pomona College. No class 
of students that we have shows better training, 
more well guided intelligence, greater moral 
earnestness than this. We have been in a 
position to apply to this institution the only 
test that ought to be applied in judging of the 
value of an educational establishment, 
and Pomona has not been found want- 
ing." 

That this distinguished man was 
correct in his estimate of the work this 
institution of Southern California is do- 
ing cannot be doubted for a moment by 
those who are familiar with the history 
of the college and what it has accom- 
plished during the past school year just 
completed by the commencement exer- 
cises, the eleventh aniversary, which 
took place this week commencing Sunday 
and concluding on Wednesday evening. 
The following was the program: 

Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermon, 11 
a.m., Rev. F. L. Ferguson, president. 

Vesper Service with communion, 4 
p. m. 

Praise service, 7 p.m. 

Address before the Christian Associa- 
tion, 7:30 p.m. 

Monday — Dole prize debate, 3 p.m. 

Choral Club Concert, 8 p.m. 
Tuesday — Class day exercises. 

Anniversary of the School of Music, 
8 p.m. 

Tuesday and Wednesday — Anniversary of 
the School of Art and Design. 

Wednesday — Commencement Exercises, 
10 a.m. 

Annual dinner and toasts. 

Alumni reunion, 4 p.m. 

Annual reception, 8 p.m. 

Additional comment on the Choral Club 
concert may be found on the Musical page of 
this week's Western Graphic. 

In President Ferguson thecollege possesses 
a man who seems both energetic and resource- 
ful, and has been instrumental during the 
past year in placing the financial affairs of 
the institution on a footing which will enable 
it in the future to reach out into a much 
broader and larger field of work than it has 
done hitherto. 

The graduating class this year is a large 
one and the freshman class which will start 
in with the opening of the new college year 
next fall promises to be by far the largest 
ever known in the eleven years history of the 
college. 

To those who associate the best citizenship 
and the consequent highest culture with a col- 
lege education, a close observation of the de- 
velopment of such colleges as that at Pomona 
in our country will prove quite profitable. 
The New England States possess in Dart- 
mouth, Amherst and Williams colleges insti- 
tutions after which Pomona College and many 
similar ones throughout the middle and wes- 
tern states are modeled. The curiculum varies 
but little in its essential features in so far as 
compatible with the age and resultant facil- 
ities of these western institutions from the 
older ones above mentioned, and the faculty, 
as is that of Pomona, is largely made up of 
graduates of the New England colleges with 



usually one or two from the larger and more 
prominent universities of Harvard, Yale or 
Princeton. 

The law, medical and newspaper profes- 
sions throughout the west are filled today with 
graduates of these colleges, and ere many 
years have rolled by Pomona College gradu- 
ates will doubtless be heard from in this coast 
region and our growing empire in the islands 
oi the Pacific. 

If there is any distinguishing character- 
istic which may be pointed out above all else 
for which Pomona College and those of its 
class are conspicuous it is the high standard 
of scholarship, the thoroughness of work re- 
quired of the student, the patient attention 
given to the smallest details going to complete 
a good education. 

As Mr. Bacon of Berkely further remarked 
in his address above referred to: "It has been 
a common characteristic of these institutions 
that they have not tried to do more than they 



The Training School for Nurses of the Cal- 
lifornia Hospital gave its first annual com- 
mencement at Ebell Hall, 721 South Broad- 
way, on Thursday evening last, and the fol- 
lowing was the program: 

Opening Prayer Rev. C. C. Pierce 

Trio, allegro Fesca 
Klizabcth M. Jordan, Arthur Marshall Perry. 
B. Bierlich. 

Address Hon. W. A. Cheney 

Trio, andante Mendelssohn 
Address and Dr. F. T. Bicknell 

Delivery of Diplomas Pros. Board of Directors 
Trio, andantino, allegro con fuoco < Jade 
Benediction Rev. C. C. Pierce 
These were the graduates: Miss Althea F. 
Clark, Miss Lillian Simpson, Miss Susan A. 
Purdam, Miss Mary Sergeant, all of Los An- 
geles. 

Tiik LADIES of the Los Angeles Free Kin- 
dergarten Association are to hold their annual 
Lawn Fete at the home of Mme. Caroline 
M. Severance, No. 806 West Adams street, 




HOLMES HALL, POMONA COLLEGE 



were fairly capable of doing; they have pre- 
ferred to do a few things well rather than to 
do many things superficially. They have not 
pretended to give that which they had not, 
and what they have given has been good." 

What may perhaps seem most important 
of all to parents seeking for the- proper place 
to give their children, who have thus far been 
properly trained, a higher education, in the 
location of Pomona College is an advantage 
which is paramount. Not only intellectually 
but morally the influences about this institu- 
tion are the very best and there need be no 
fear on the part of the parent that because of 
environment, because of the too close proxim- 
ity of a large city, his son may be sent out of 
college well equipped mentally but with a 
fondness for vices bred by four or more years 
familiarity with them that effort in later life 
shall render it impossible for him to shake 
off. 

To the casual visitor at Pomona College 
there seems to be in the co-educational iife of 
the institution an ever daily influence which 
tends toward making of the students ladies 
and gentlemen in the truest sense. 

It was not the privilege of the representa- 
tive of this paper to be present at all the ex- 
ercises attendant upon the closing of Pomona 
College's year of '99, but what he did see im- 
pressed him favorably indeed. 

The senior class consists of a body of 
ladies and gentlemen which would reflect 
great credit on any institution in the land. 
The remaining underclass men are bright and 
enthusiastic and the faculty earnest and effi- 
cient. The future of the college seems brighter 
than at any time in its career. 

EMHAi.MKD-beef-eating soldiers are glad 
that Armour is getting better a Carlsbad(?) 



Tuesday, July 11, from 2 to 6 p.m. A num- 
ber of prominent educators from the Kast and 
abroad will be present. 



St, Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding: and Day College for 
Young- Men and Boys 

. . 'TM I H courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
* mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled t<> the decree of Hachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides Knglish, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Che Tall term Beqins on monday, September 4th 

Wot further liifonnntlnn, Mnd for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A. UNN, C. M. 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS 

She, Uo to ixu- yd, 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 

LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 

40c to !K)c. 'i r i<: to 60c 
REFRIGERATORS IS, f7.80 to. $20 
I. T. MA It I IN. &3I&35 So. String SI. 
wiiim-i fJbjUri fold or renttd 






NEW HALL OF JUSTICE, SAN FRANCISCO. 
The new Hull of Justice, San Francisco, is a stately and beautiful building. It is 
in Italian Renaissance, five stories high, with a central tower. The tower rises to a 
height of 110 feet. The city prison will be on the fifth floor. The corner stone was 
laid in December, 1890. It will be ready for occupancy in about three months. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 





Many of 

Your Townswomen 



Are customers of ours and the satisfaction we 
have given in quality, style and the very low 
price causes them to continue their orders. 

We make Suits, Spring and Summer, Skirts, 
Bicycle Suits, Golf Suits — everything in Suits 
and Cloaks. 

Send bu Express prepaid 

Catalogue and Samples 

Free by mail for the askjhg 

The National 
Cloak Co mpany 

119=121 West 23d Street 
New York City 



Gardening »n 
California 




W. S. LYON 



FREE 



For a limited time we will give 
one of these books with each 
new or renewed annual sub- 
scription to Western- 
Graphic 
$2.00 a year 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
ZfloJ&ers In Southern 
California 

Written for tfiis Soif and Climate 
jQicefii Tffustrated 
Overy lover of ^rbtyers slioufd Have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) : <" £■ 



Railway 

Magnifcent 
Panorama of 
Earth and Ocean 



a 



Grandest Trip 0Jh 
on Earth A 

A 



6cbo Mountain Rouse ft ft 

SITI'ATKI) on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
1SU0 fret nliove sett level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartmenM 
with or without baths. ( rristne unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

Special 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lswa Railway fa'e 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 5t'e round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to I'asadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full information 
CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Traffic and Kxcurrtion Agent 
214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main 960 



Tufts' Electric Works 



o<] buccks.nok to p>o 



PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



« est* 



701 South Main Street 



Electrical l*epairin*r 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

;u-.<i Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=Class Machine Work 

JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



PreBs of Geo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) 311 313 New High Street 




Los Angeles, Saturday, July 8, 1899. 




MR. AND MRS. CLAY CLEMENT 



Western Graphic 



McCall's J ly Patterns and Magazine Now In 

Vacation Traveling Bags 

If you are going to do any trave ing this summer, we would 
like to have you study the traveling bag account from our 
economical standpoint. We honestly believe that we can 
save you a great deal of money. We are sure that our variety is 
large enough to satisfy any reasonable demand. Every bag 
offered is of the best Quality and up to date in style. 
Telescopes from 75c up. 

Dress Suit Cases, Irish linen covered, good strong frames, alligator 
leather corners and handle, brass trimmed, 22-inch size $3.50. 24 inch size 
$4.00. 

Dress Suit Cases, covered with oak tanned vici kid, lined with strong 
Irish linen canvas, double tough leather corners, brass trimmed and Yale 
hick, 22-inch size £6.50, 24 inch size J7.00. 

Handbags, imitation alligator leather, brass trimmed, 13-in. size $1 25. 

French Grain Calf Handbags, steel frame, 12 inch size f 1.75, 13 inch 
size $2. 00, 14 inch size $2.25, 15-iuch size #2.50. 

CALIFORNIA BLANKETS— Just the thing for campers and 
F easide cottages, $2.95 a pair. 

COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 



317=325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth 



* 

/is 
$ 
/is 
m 
$ 
/♦\ 
/♦\ 

AS 

/♦\ 
/♦\ 
/is 
/♦s 
/is 



Spend the Summer 



AT 



and 



San Diego 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 

POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 

June 16 and 17 August 4 and 5 

July I and 2 September I and 2 

Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

Inquire of Santa Fc Route \gent 200 South -pi ing Street (cor. Jnd) Los Angeles 



M/ 
Vt/ 
\!/ 

I 

\l/ 
\!/ 
VI/ 

i 
\»/ 

VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 

1 
t 

vl/ 

<§> 



FINEST BARBKK SHOP SIU TH OF VAN NUYS HOTEL IN CONNECTION 



Plain 
Electric 



BATHS 



Medicated 
Vapor 



From 15 cts to 5o cts 

Ladies private eutrauce on Wall street 



F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

252 EAST FIFTH ST 



*\L« "J,* *sL* ■sL* _■ L* *sL* *\L* *X" -sL-* ■si** -X- ■si* 




INCOIU 'ORATED 

444 ALISO STREE 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

T" •T- T- T~ T* •T- -t- T- ■?- T^~^-~~=f^ ~ TEL. M. 91 



Joskimi MA1KR, Gbobob Zobklein 
Pres acd Trcas. Vice-Pres. and Sec'v i 

i 

HOME INDUSTRY ? 



KEEP MONEY AT HOME 



Maier & Zobelein \ 

Brewery 




JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, COLONIAL SECRETARY. 

If there is a eonfliet in South Africa it x.ill bw because Joseph Chamberlain, Eng- 
land's colonial secretary, meets the firumess of President Kri ger in the same spirit. 
Chamberlain believes in protecting British interests at all luiZ uds, and lie w ill push the 
Boers to the utmost limit if Oom Paul does not recede from his position. 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 

Western Graphic 

Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Kntcred at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



ft 



ROSE PURITY WATER 



. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER from Highland Glen. California The 
analysis of ROSK ITKI1 Y WATER shows it to contain the most healthful properties known for 
Constipation. Indigestion and Kidney difficulties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use It is nicely fiirnithed i 11 one and live-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all points of the 
city and towns through our agents. You are invited to visit us. see our beautiful location end 
established improvements for delivery of ROSE Pl'RITY WATER to ell our customers. Try it and 
find as stated. Where it has its way it Hows night and day. It is cool and cl ar as crystal as it 
runs from the Spring Rock Fountain head. It is not a dead water; its virtue for h r alth is Spirit, 
Life and Purity. For orders addre-s 

LAMB & WHITNEY, 

PASADENA ANL> 49tli A> ENCE8 



I OS \N(.i:i.KS, CAL, 
Tel. Snl> Station IO 



JEFFERY & JEFFERY 

High Art 

Business Suits to Order 

$ 1 0 to $ 1 2.50 Moved to 406 S. Spring St. 




L* A> Sulphur Springs 



and Baths I 



• 1»» Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 

These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of 
Kidney ano Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. 

A. PUISSEGUK, Proprietor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 2 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 8, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cent* a Copy 



Western Graphic 

QEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 



KDITOR 



THE LATE STRIKES in Cleveland and 
Brooklyn take their places alongside 
the trusts and syndicates that are being 
created almost daily for the further enrich- 
ment of the rich and the further impoverish- 
ment of the poor; or, to put it more plainly, 
for the benefit of the luxurious class and to 
the detriment of the man with the hoe. Where 
it will end goodness only knows. 

But to the trusts: what to do with them is 
problematic. The strikers are more readily 
disposed of for they always get it in the neck 
before the end. 

But what to do with the trusts is a proposi- 
tion that is being vigorously debated in the 
organs of both the leading political parties 
and nearly every one of them has a remedy 
that is believed to be effective. Passing of 
laws by state or national authorities does not 
seem to meet the case, for in spite of them all 
the creation of new syndicates go on with un- 
abated zeal. 

A number of papers advocate, as a remedy, 
that "in every case where the beneficiaries of 
a protective duty on any product or com- 
modity have organized a combination of any 
kind to control the output and engross the 
market of such goods the duty should be 
wholly abolished," but it is by no means cer- 
tain that such a course would meet the case. 
It seems to be the fact that trust-made goods 
do not need the stimulant of a protective 
tariff and that such wares can and do com- 
pete successfully with foreign-made goods in 
the foreign markets. The present purpose of 
trusts is to reduce the price of the product. 
Originally they were created to enhance the 
selling price of manufactured goods, but such 
a plan had only the effect of calling into ex- 
istence new manufactories which competed 
with the trusts and compelled them to pur- 
chase such new enterprises to enable them to 
maintain the price and retain the market. 
But recently the purpose of the trusts seems 
to be to put the cost of goods so low that no 
new manufactories can be started to compete 
with them, and in this way they can control 
the market. 

But the opponents of the trusts, while ad- 
mitting that generally these combinations re- 
sult in reducing the price of their product to 
the consumer, declare that the resultant bene- 
fits are more than offset by the reduced price 
that the producers of the raw materials that 
are used obtain for their product and that the 
trusts also control the skilled labor they em- 
ploy and the wages it receives — in other 
words, that the power that controls the mar- 
ket and the output of a commodity can also 
control the price of both the raw material and 
labor that it uses and employs. 



While trusts are frequently denounced as 
the crowning evil of the day, those who be- 
rate them with the most severity are at a loss 
to agree upon a remedy, which shows that 
there is something yet to be learned regarding 
them and their commercial effect. There are 
but a few who oppose the principle involved 
in these trade organizations who yet believe 
that their very increase will furnish a remedy 
and that overcapitalization or something else 
will eventually work the destruction of such 
as are opposing legitimate industry and regu- 
lar commercial transactions. A good deal 
more must be learned of trusts than is yet 
known to enable either Congress or state legis- 
latures to formulate a remedy that shall ex- 
actly fit the exigencies of the case without in- 
jury to legitimate business and industrial 
enterprises. 

Even so profound a thinker and reasoner 
on most public queetions as Senator John P. 
Jones is distrait. To be sure he lays some of 
the evils to the uppermost question of which 
Bryan is the apostle, but he admits his own- 
perplexity as to what form of remedy shall 
effect the cure. Meantime strikes and trusts 
go hand in hand, and so long as the one fails 
so long will the other succeed. The time may 
come when the strikes may bust the trusts — 
quien sabe? 



Really there does not seem to be need of 
a National Republican Convention next year, 
for Governor Roosevelt renominated President 
McKinley in his speech at Chicago a few days 
ago in unmistakable tones, and prominent 
men and newspapers all over the country are 
seconding Teddy's nominating speech. Mc- 
Kinley is just as good as elected, as he has 
brought the country out of a slough of des- 
pondency and despair, conducted some trium- 
phant campaigns on land and sea : added lus- 
tre to our arms and to our flag, enlarged our 
possessions so that it takes two whole days to 
celebrate the Fourth of July, and generally 
won the confidence and " admiration of the 
American people. He is the logical candidate 
and he has alreadv been nominated. 



There is a suspicion of unfair competi- 
tion with the Orpheum in the actions of the 
heads of departments of our city government 
in the hares and hounds episode. Such a 
merry circus by dignified city officials has not 
been acted for many moons in Los Angeles. 
Think of our Mayor — broad shouldered, big 
hearted Fred Eaton — seated in the grand 
stand by the race track, surrounded by a reti- 
nue of coppers, submitting to the jibes of the 
patrons of dog racing and meditating on 
the undeserved anathemas of the anti-dog 
racers. Justice James little thought when 
digesting the law points on cruelty to animals 
in his snug little den on the fourth floor of 
the court house what a rumpus his elucida- 
tion of the statutes would stir up. From 
several points of view this row is unfortunate. 
Such affairs always involve others than those 
directly interested, oftentimes making enemies 
of bosom friends or at least causing sores that 
are easily torn open. From the dog racers' 
side it certainly looks like persecution that a 



man's business of two years' standing should 
suddenly become a mote in the eye of the 
law and be demolished in a night; but Col. 
Black has only himself to blame, for if he 
had restricted his sport to respectable limits it 
would probably have never been interfered 
with. And here the old epigram "give a man 
a yard and he will take an ell" is applicable 
and points a good moral. 

As Black has thrown up his hands and 
like a true sport proposes to take his medicine 
smiling, it is hoped that the powers that be 
will stop stirring the me a s and expunge the 
chapter from history. 



The multitude of admirers of Father 
Adam, without regard to religious or other 
affiliations, are planning a farewell banquet 
in his honor, which will take place some time 
in the near future. As a churchman and a 
priest Father Adam is a splendid example 
ard above reproach, and as a gentleman and 
scholar he is of rare quality. 



The m iny fritnds of Captain J. H. Nor- 
ton greatly regret the terrible accident which 
overtook him while he was setting off fire- 
works for the young folks in the neighbor- 
hood of his residence on the Fourth. Captain 
Norton is too good and too noble a fellow to 
be thus partially knocked out. 



Not the least valuable of the work done 
by the religious conventions held in various 
parts of the country during the present year 
is that devoted to the discussion of the con- 
dition of the colored people at the South and 
the relations that they sustain to the crime 
that is common in that section. 

The assembly of the United Presbyterian 
church, lately held at Philadelphia, went to 
the subject with a commendable spirjt and 
resolved upon the employment of colored 
teachers and the organization of colored con- 
gregations at the South. As a prelude to such 
action the question of the crime charged to 
negroes was investigated and it was reported 
that in one of the typical Southern states (56 
per cent, of all the crime justly charged to 
colored men was perpetrated by persons under 
twenty-five years of age. It was brought out 
in the discussion that this condition of affairs 
was largely due to the fact that the younger 
generation was growing up with free access to 
the saloons, gaming houses and other disrep 
utable resorts, which could only be counter- 
acted by education and religious instruction. 

Lynching mid drastic laws are powerless to 
bring about a change in present conditions, 
and this is recognized at the South as well as 
among those who have had the opportunity 
to study the prevailing conditions. 

In such a movement as was outlined the 
Southern people will extend all the aid possi- 
ble, for none recognize more than they what 
it means to have the rising generation of the 
colored race grow up as criminals as they 
have been permitted to do. 



With a regular annual failure of its peach 
crop and only one senator, Delaware is in no 
mood tc be trifled with. 



4 



Western Graphic 




Greater L 

City and 



SOME thirteen years ago, while preparing 
a series of twelve articles on California 
wines for the New York Times, I received the 
following letter from a gentleman named 
Vignes, which reached me too late for my 
purpose, but which is of enough interest to 
UBe at the present time. It partly corrects an 
impression that prevailed for many years that 
Kohler and Frohling were the pioneer wine 
makers of California: 

"I have the pleasure to receive your let- 
ter of yesterday, the 24th, 1886, and hasten 
to answer. The vine, as you know, was in- 
troduced into California by Spanish mission- 
aries, and each mission grew a certain quantity 
for its own use. In 1830 my uncle, John 
Louis Vignes, bought a plat of land at Los 
Angeles where he immediately planted vines 
for the purpose of speculation, and as soon as 
the vines produced he made wines and bran- 
dies which he sold not only in Los Angeles 
but on the whole coast. When I rejoined my 
uncle in July, 1839, he possessed in the neigh- 
borhood of forty thousand feet of vines, a 
very good cellar, and good casks which had 
been constructed on the place and made from 
the oak of the country, cut by himself. In 
1840 I took passage on the ship Mooson with 
a cargo of his wines and brandies for the 
ports of Santa Barbara, Monterey and San 
Francisco, and I sold them at the good price 
of two dollars a gallon for the white wines 
and four dollars a gallon for the brandy. 
My uncle continued in this business up to 
1885, at which period my brother and I 
bought of him the above mentioned property, 
called El Aliso, and we continued this busi- 
ness. 

"In 1855 Messrs. Kohler and Frohling 
bought some grapes at Los Angeles and made 
some wine, and in 1857 they established a 
branch in San Francisco under the Mont- 
gomery Block, and my brother and I estab- 
lished our branch in the same year on the 
corner of Jackson and Montgomery streets. 
In this same year, 1857, I bottled fifty thou- 
sand bottles of champagne, and in the follow- 
ing year, 1858, I bottled one hundred and 
fifty thousand bottles. I continued at dif- 
ferent periods and have bottled in small 
quantities here and at San Jose. In 1860 I 
sent a cargo of our different wines to New 
York, and in January, 1861, I established my 
cellar at No. 81 Cedar street of that city. 
Several months afterwards the agent of Messrs. 
Kohler and Frohling likewise established a 
cellar on Broadway, New York. As you see, 
Kohler and Frohling are not the pioneer mer- 
chants of California, nor even in Los Angeles, 
as Mr. J. Louis Vignes began twenty-five 
years before them. Wine making was his 
only occupation, and my brother and myself 
continued his business. Mr. Emanuel Re- 
quena at Los Angeles, as well as Don William 
Wolfskill, an American of the same place, 
made and sold wines and brandies beginning 
from 1840, cutting from their own vines. Mr. 
Louis Bouchet, a Frenchman of Los Angeles 
and proprietor of a vineyard, had also begun 
to make wine in 1837. Don Antonio Coronel, 



os Hngels 

County 




Don Volseo Tapea and several other Cali- 
fornians who had vineyards at Los Angeles, 
made and sold wines ten or twelve years be- 
fore Messrs. Kohler and Frohling. Therefore 
you see they are very wrong in supposing 
themselves pioneers in this branch. Mr. John 
Louis Vignes was the first and all the others 
followed." 



lungs. It was all so different that it was 
highly enjoyable. 

"I understand now why so many people 
come to Southern California and think no other 
part of the State is worth living in. On their 
way in they pass through orange groves, with 
the golden fruit hanging on the boughs. That 
captivates them. They go no further. They 
get off the train as soon as they can and settle 
down." 



an editor's impressions 
Some time ago Editor Daniels of the 
Alameda Argus had some business down 
this way He recorded his impressions for 
the' benefit of his readers. From his article 



Answers to Correspondents. 

Sti dent — Certainly, bookkeeping can be 
learned at home. All you have to do is not 
to lend them. 

Reader — No, it is not an uncommon thing 
for the good to go to the bad; otherwise there 
would be no demand for missionaries. 

Inquirer — Yes, there are bookcases made 
from lawsuits relating to copyrights, but we 
wouldn't recommend them for your library. 

Sentiment — We don't know why the lily 
is recognized as the emblem of purity, unless 




GAMMA ETA KAPPA FRATERNITY 

Frank Uillelen Victor Stewart Al. Cook 
Vaughn TombliL. Philo Liudley 

Robert LangfbeO Fred Hambright Carl Tufts Will Nevin Kussell Taylor 

John Harris Clarence Hubbard 

Tom Haskius John Posey Otto Brodbeck 



Hugh Shiun 



Ben Harwood 



Harry Gregory 



Simpson Sinsabaugb 



we take a portion, which is quite interesting: 
"The trip down was unusually pleasant. 
We breakfasted at Mojave at 9 on Sunday 
and rolled into the Arcade depot at Los 
Angeles at a quarter to two. The telephone 
soon located Frank Thompson at the depot of 
the Redondo Railway, and it was not a very 
great while until we were with friends and 
relatives at Redondo. 

"What a genial sky it is down there! You 
do not experience, even on the ocean's edge, 
any of the harshness that we are accustomed 
to in San Francisco. When I awoke Monday 
morning my window looked directly upon 
the sea. I threw it open and was greeted 
with balmy airs, which invigorated and toned 
up. It was a different ozone that I inhaled, 
if there is any difference in ozones. The air 
was bracing, yet it was in no sense harsh, and 
I had not the least inclination to shut it out. 
I dressed, and got out of doors as soon as 
possible, put one of the incomparable carna- 
tions in my buttonhole and expanded my 



it is because man has never been able to adul- 
terate it. 

Athlete — Yes, a porous plaster will some- 
times remove the effects of a strain or wrench, 
but you'd better keep the wrench to aid in re- 
moving the porous plaster. 

Medicus — The only thing new in diseases 
this season, as far as we have been able to 
ascertain, are neu-ralgia and pneu-monia. 

Borum — No, you are not likely to take 
cold ventilating your theories, but there is 
some danger of your making other people hot. 

Chauncy — Of course it is improper to 
smack your lips at the dinner table. It is 
also unwise to smack any other fellow's lips 
there. 

Young Wife. — You have evidently been 
misinformed. Mock turtle soup is not made 
from tortoise-shell cats — or it shouldn't be, at 
least. 

Police Commissioner — Yee, it is a dreadful 
thing to be reprimanded. But it beats sus- 
pension or losing a job every lime. 



Western Graphic 



5 



UNIVERSAL EXPOSITION OF 1900 

SECOND MEETING OK THE CALIFORNIA PARIS 
COMMISSIONERS 

THE SECOND MEETING of the Cali- 
fornia Paris Commissioners was held on 
Friday and Saturday, June 23rd and 24th, at 
their quarters, rooms 55 and 5(3 Occidental 
Hotel, San Francisco, all the Commissioners 
being present. The Graphic presented a full 
report of the first meeting of the Commission- 
ers, being the only paper in the state that re- 
ported all the proceedings. It now presents 
the doings of the second meeting as follows: 

The meeting was called to order at ten 
o'clock, June 23rd, and minutes of the pre- 
ceding meeting read and approved. 

The chief feature of the session was the 
report of Commissioner Runyon, who had 
just returned from the east, where he obtained 
the views of Commissioner-General Peck re- 
garding the nature of the exhibition wanted 
from California, which was as follows: 

I returned from my visit to Commissioner- 
General Peck, where I was received most cor- 
dially and found the Commissioner-General 
as well as the heads of the different depart- 
ments very enthusiastic over the large appro- 
priation that California has made, knowing 
that the products of this state are such as to 
make a very much better exhibit than prob- 
ably any other state in the Union. 

It is the Commissioners' idea to make a 
California exhibit in the departments of agri- 
culture, horticulture, viticulture, mining, for- 
estry and fishing. On account of the large 
appropriation made by California, Commis- 
sioner Pack cabled the French authorities as 
to whether we could have the privilege of put- 
ting up a state building in which to have a 
collective exhibit. The return cable came 
from Paris to the effect that the exposition was 
to be not an interstate but an international 
exhibition, and no state would have a collec- 
tive exhibit. Should we have been given this 
privilege, however, we would not have had the 
time to send our California woods to Paris 
and erect a suitable building. After carefully 
looking over the situation the Commissioners 
thought it much more desirable to exhibit the 
products of California in competition with 
those of the world, which means that we will 
have our different exhibits together with those 
of the world; yet the catalogue will give credit 
to the different countries, states and individ- 
uals from which the exhibits have come. 

F. J. V. Skiff will have charge of the min- 
ing exhibit. Professor Charles Richard 
Dodge of Washington has charge of agricul- 
ture, viticulture and horticulture. Willard 
A. Smith of Chicago will look after transpor- 
tation. Dr. Tarleton H. Bean is director of 
forestry and fisheries. All of the gentlemen 
named assure us that California will be given 
sufficient space for its different exhibits, and 
all of the gentlemen are anxious that we 
should make as large an exhibit as possible, 
and assure us that every consideration will be 
shown our state. 

By the comprehensive system of labeling 
which will be adopted the name and address 
of the contributor or exhibitor and the 
locality from which the specimen was derived 
will always appear and in the case of state or 
other association exhibits special descriptive 
placards neatly framed will be conspicuously 
placed in or upon the case in which such ex- 
hibits are installed in order that thecontribu- 
tor shall derive the fullest benefit from the 
exhibit. 

Every exhibitor will receive the same con- 
sideration from the jury of awards as though 
he were exhibiting on a space allotted to him 
as an individual and covering many square 
feet in area. 

H. J. Rodgers, director of education, is ex- 
pected to visit California within a few days. 
Professor Dodge will also have two represen- 
tatives from the east sometime during the 
month to confer with the California Commis- 



sioners regarding exhibits in the agriculture, 
viticulture arid horticulture departmen is. 

In view of the fact that the space avail- 
able at Paris for the raw and manufactured 
products of agricultural and the animal in- 
dustry is exceedingly limited, the exhibit 
must be collective. This means that no in- 
dividual space will be allotted to an individ- 
ual grower or manufacturer, corporation or 
association, local or state, though all will be 
invited to co-operate as far as limited space 
will admit, the fullest credit to be given for 
contributions, even to single samples, that may 
be contributed by farmers. The exhibits of a 
state, of the land department of a railroad 
company, or of an individual will be treated 
alike. The wheat samples will be phown in 
the wheat exhibit, which will represent the 
wheat interests of the entire country; the cot- 
ton specimens, from whatever source, will be 
classified together in the space devoted to raw 
textiles; and the collections of so-called 
breakfast foods will be brought together in 
one exhibit in the section devoted to manu- 
facturers of farinaceous products. 

The United States Commission will con- 
struct the necessary cases for the collective 
display of agriculture, horticulture and food 
products, these to be uniform in design and 
finish and elegant in appearance. All raw 
products needing preparation for exhibit such 
as the cereals, cotton, wool, etc., will be sent 
to Washington to be selected and prepared. 
In their preparation uniform glass jars and 
cases will be used. 

Commissioner Truman moved that the 
thanks of the board be extended Commis- 
sioner Runyon; and Commissioner Foote in 
seconding the resolution paid a handsome 
compliment to the President of the Commis- 
sion for the many things he had accom- 
plished. 

Letters were then read from chiefs of divi- 
sions under Commissioner-General Peck, all 
of whom have taken a great interest in Cali- 
fornia. Several of these communications 
were received from the superintendents of horti- 
culture, fish and fisheries, forestry and agri- 
culture departments, all relative to the gath- 
ering of the exhibits in these divisions of the 
general display. 

Two representatives of the horticultural, 
viticultural and agricultural departments are 
already in California looking over the ground 
personally and they will determine upon the 
value of and the consequent space necessary 
for the display in this line in this state. They 
will be the guests of the- California Commis- 
sion during their stay. Mr. Rodgers is in Los 
Angeles and is being looked after by Commis- 
sioner Truman who was requested to make 
his visit agreeable in all ways. 

A communication was received from the 
Governor of Colorado regarding a joint col- 
lective exhibit of the gold products of the 
two states. In view of the fact that no in- 
dividual exhibits are to be allowed Secretary 
Varney Gaskill was instructed to notify the 
Colorado executive that no combination could 
be formed. 

A communication from the Commissioner- 
General was read. The chief news in it was 
the designation of the shipping points for ex- 
hibits. They are Chicago, New York and 
Washington. All of the California exhibits 
must go by rail to these points where, with 
the material from the other states, they will 
be gathered at a central point, probably New 
York. From there the display will be sent to 
France free on a special transport. All the 
agricultural and horticultural exhibits will be 
taken to Washington and the viticultural 
and mining exhibits to Chicago. 

One-third of the United States space in 
the forestry building has been promised to the 



California display and one-half of the space 
allotted for the wine exhibit of the United 
States, and as a consequence great efforts will 
be made to make this one of the prevailing 
features of the display from this state. 

It will be the object of the Califomians to 
secure as many individual and state prizes as 
possible. Much of the money appropriated 
by the state will be used in entertaining, in 
literature and printing and arranging the dis- 
play so that it will each day present some new 
and attractive feature which will claim at- 
tention. 

Commissioner Truman was appointed a 
committee of one to attend to all the printing 
and literary work of the Commission, and 
Commissioner Foote was chosen to look after 
the interests of the fish and fisheries of the 
State, and also to secure the models of the 
Oregon and Olympia, if possible, although 
these models are now in Japan. 

All exhibits must respectively be in Chi- 
cago and Washington by September 30, and 
thereafter they will be cared for by the Com- 
missioner-General, and they will be looked 
after as regards handling and climatic influ- 
ences by the United States Commission. On 
this account Commissioner Truman moved 
that at ihe next meeting, which shall be held 
on the tenth of July, a superintendent of hor- 
ticulture, superintendent of mining, superin- 
tendent of viticulture and director of exhibits 
be appointed, which was agreed to. 

The United States Commission is of the 
opinion that by a system of cold storage, or 
other method, fresh fruits as they come along 
in 1900 may be exhibited some or all the 
months of the Exposition, and arrangements 
will be made for California to show its pro- 
ductions as well as for other states, all under 
the auspices of the United States Commis- 
sion. 

A telegram was sent to Commissioner-Gen- 
eral Peck thanking him for his elegant treat- 
ment of Commissioner Runyon, and requesting 
him to set apart space in the United States 
building for headquarters of the California 
Commission. 

After some desultory matters the Commis- 
sion adjourned until Monday, July 10, unless 
earlier called by the President. 

When Virtue Triumphed 

THERE was a man who tried to do 

The very best he could; 
He held that being rich was not 

As fair as being good; 
Sly tempters tried to pull him down, 

Their schemes were all in vain; 
He would not turn from righteous ways 

For power or for gain. 

Full many a snare was laid for him 

By men of evil minds; 
He passed unsmirched through troubled 
scenes 

Of many various kinds; 
Where others would have faltered he 

Still held to honor's course, 
I'nhindered by chicanery 

Unterrified by force. 

He was a good man through and through, 

A better never was; 
He always scorned unlawful means, 

No matter what the cause; 
With honor as his watchword he 

Pursued his righteous way, 
And won out in the end, but ah I 

This man was in a play 



Western Graphic 




To the Profession— A special feature of the Western 
Ghaphic is its Department of Music and Art, which is in charge 
of an experienced and careful editor. Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and will he published free. All communications 
should he sent in by Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Editor of Western 
Graphic, Los Angeles. 



I T IS not often that such a superb com- 
piny as the Lambardi Italian Grand 
Opera Company can be secured twice the 
same season in a city the size of Los Angeles, 
but through the medium of a request from 
quite a number of patrons of opera in this 
city, the Lambardi Company, which goes east 
by the Southern route, will play a return en- 
gagement in this city at the Los Angeles the- 
atre during the week of July 17. It will 
indeed Le a pleasure to hear these prime favo- 




PROF. AREVALO 

rites again in the creations of the kings of 
lyric music. The company comes in its en- 
tirety from San Francisco and will present a 
repertoire which includes a number of operas 
not yet given by them in this city, among 
them noticeably '"Mignon," in which they 
achieved such a triumph in San Francisco, 
and "Un Balloin Maschera," another favorite 
of music lovers. This probably will be the only 
opportunity during the season of 1899-1900 
in which an opera organization of this char- 
acter will be heard in Los Angeles, as there 
are no bookings to indicate that such a superb 
company of singers will come this way in the 
next twelve months. The sale of seats and 
the entire repertoire will be given later. 

Thk commencement exercises of the Sis- 
ters' School, Boyle Heights, June 29, was es- 
pecially attractive in its musical part, under 
the direction of Professor Arevalo, which 
showed high grade, correctness of style, and 
excellent talent. It is not, indeed, too much 
to say that no school has ever betrayed a 
greater degree of culture in music, which fact 
was emphasized by the spontaneous acclama- 
tions of the audience at the conclusion of each 
number. The editor of Graphic has known 
Professor Arevalo for nearly thirty years, 
socially and as guitar soloist and instructor. 
Native as he is of that land where the guitar 
is the queen of musical instruments his study 
of that instrument and its possibilities in the 



field of melody has been inspired by more 
than ordinary enthusiasm, and the result of 
his work speaks from his masterful handling 
of the magic strings. Perfect in technique, 
tone and correct fingering, his brilliant execu- 
tion is an unending recommendation to those 
desiring to learn the best arts of guitar play- 
ing. His pupils have been widely compli- 
mented for the grace with which they handle 
the guitar, and for this accomplishment the 
Professor's lifelong study and ability as an 
instructor is responsible. Prof. Arevalo has 
been prominent in some of the most noted 
events in the history of this city to which the 
art of his profession has contributed. At the 
opening of the Cathedral he led the music and 
sang and has enjoyed audiences running into 
the thousands at several of his entertain- 
ments. Prof. Arevalo is also a vocal instructor 
of well known reputation and a soloist of 
marked success. He can be seen at any time 
at his studio in the Wil*on Block, corner of 
First and Spring streets. 

J. Bond Francisco has a nice bunch of 
sketches as the fruit of his trip to the moun- 
tains back of Redlands last week. Mrs. Fran- 
cisco accompanied him and was much bene- 
fited by the cool mountain air. 

Next Wednesday evening Blanchard Hall 
will be the scene of a reception tendered by 
the secondary and university factions of the 
N.E.A. by the local committee on secondary 
education and the high school faculty assisted 

MISC ELLANEOUS 

A. M. EDELMAN 

ARCHITECT 

Removed to BLANCHARD MUSIC HALL BUILDING 
Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone, Red 1341 

G. A. DOBINSON 

DRAMATIC TRAINING 

VOICK and PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Studio 526 S Spring Apply by letter or between hours oflO-12M 

* 

* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 



* * T~~ 1V> 



Competent jludges say 
the Same of the 



\ to Match 



f>ardman piano 



SOLE AGENTS 



LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY 

Phone Green 1444 3J3 S. Broadway. 



*«*ftft*ft*ftft*ftftft*ft*ftftft«ftft«ft*«ftftftftft«* 

r l6HRflMSBERG] 

...WINES... 

The Host Famous of California 



Light, Delicate Wines, ||'|$ 
Matured in Underground WgM, 
Cellars and Bottled with |||| 
great care at the Vineyard 

Seam 



PACIFIC COAST AOCN18 



Sherwood & Sherwood 



Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MME. GENEVRA 

JOHN STONE-BISHOP 

CONCERT and ORATORIO SOI OIST 
VOCAL INSTIK I TION 

Pupil: Madame Anna de La (.range, Paris; Signor Baudagger, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio— Blanchard Mrsio and Art Building 
Residence - Belle vue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modini-Wood 

607 r igueroa street. 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 

230 Bellman Block 

THOMAS W . WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY 

Organist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Residence and Studio C21 West 17th 



MRS. F.RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRl < 1 ION 
and SOLO PI INISTE 

Rt fereuces: 

Blunchard Piano Co., L. A. 614 South Main Street, 
Edward Schirner, Berlin 

Moritz Moszkowski, Paris I.os Angeles, Cal. 

J. BOND FRANCISCO 

cox I RT \ IOLIN18T 
and TEACHER 

Pupil of 

Emanuel Wirth, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 

Studio— 

BLANCHARD BUILDING 




MRS. W. B. C LAPP 



TEACHER "I \OCAL MUSIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 



FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

8TUD10, SOO Blanchard Buii.dino 

MRS. S. COOK, Solo Pianist 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons 



MISS MYRTLE CANADY 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and cuncetrs accepted. 

At Studio SUITE 316 BLANCHARD BUILDING Wcduesdav, 
Residence— iTbursdav, Saturdav, forenoons. 

Caiilomia Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M 11*4 

MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHER OF PI A NO - FO RTF MUSIC 

Pupil of J. H. Hahn, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory ot 
Music; and of EL C. Post, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Studio, 433 w. Ninth St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANIST 



FRED. 



BACON 



TEACHER OF VOICE CULTURE 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday, Thursday. Saturdav 
SUITE 318 & 319 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTURE 
Pure 1-taliati Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

US BLANCHARD BUILDING 

MARY BELLE D A I L Y 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
vo I <' E < T I.TUKE 

Formerly Soprano with the Htvwuon Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, 315 BLANCHARD Building 



ROLLA E. GARDNER 

I1AXJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Studio, 230% South Si ring St 



MISS M 



PEARSON 



VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal culture, piano aud pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 1922 S. GRAND AVE 

PROF. M . S . AREVALO 

(it ITAR LESSONS 

Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice Culture 
Siudio, 126 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and First Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Pasadena mornings Telephone Main 148 

MUSICAL PR INTING 

TOP NOTCH STYLES 
Concert Programs, Announcement Folders, Fine Engraving 
Best Stationery 

WESTERN GRAPHIC, 
Tel. Main 1053. 311 New High St. 



Western Graphic 



7 



by W. L. Judson, Mme. Genevra Johnstone- 
Bisbop, Miss Flora King, J. Bond Francisco, 
Miss Florence Hyer and Miss Mary Belle 
Daily. 

A DELIGHTFUL musical evening given by 
invitation to a few friends took place at 
the studio of Mr*. Frances Louis Hord in the 
Blanchard Building on Monday last about 8 
p. m. Mrs. Hord, who possesses a beautiful 
soprano voice of magnificent range, sang a 
number of selections among which were 
"Prayer," Marchesi; "Sans Toi," I'Aordelot, 
and "O Light of Love," a new selection, com- 
poser's name not yet divulged. Miss Myrtle 
Canady, the charming and talented young 
violinist who has just opened a studio in the 
Blanchard Building, and of whom an engrav- 
ing was published in a recent issue of the 
Graphic, played two selections, one "Fan- 
tasia," by Leonard, the other "Prayer," by 





MRS. FRANCES LEWIS HOKD 

Bazzini. Mrs. S. Cook, an excellent pianist 
from Toledo, Ohio, and who is to occupy the 
studio with Mrs. Hord a portion of the time, 
gave two selections from Chopin. The work 
of each of the artists was well received, so 
much so, in fact, that they all responded to 
requests to provide more selections than had 
been their original intention. Mr. Perry 
Porker, the polite and capable young man 
associated with the Blanchard Piano Com- 
pany, acted as accompanist for the ladies. 

At its closing meeting for the year the 
Ebell Society elected the following named 
ladies to serve as officers for the ensuing year: 
President, Mrs. Charles M. Flint; first vice 
president, Mrs Sumner P. Hunt; second vice 
president, Mrs. A. L. Danskin; third vice pres- 
ident, Mrs. L. W. Blinn; recording secretary, 
Mrs. A. P. West; corresponding secretary, 
Miss Frances Maurice; treasurer, Mrs. T. T. 
Knight; general curator, Mrs. Sydney P. Par- 
sons; directors, Mrs. J. S. Vosburg and Mrs. 
W. S. Bartlett. Mrs. H. W. R. Strong was 
made an honorary member for life. 

Mr. Blanchard has secured to be on ex 
hibition in the art gallery of the Blanchard 
Building during the next two weeks the mag- 
nificent painting, fifteen by ten feet in diame- 
ter, "Sampson and Delilah," the work of the 
famous artist, K. Pavlik. This picture was 
painted in 1887 and is truly wonderful to be- 
hold, the figures being not far from life size. 
It is owned in this city and has been pro- 
cured for exhibition after a great deal of 
trouble and expense. During this period of 
time there will also be on exhibition in the 
hall about eighteen of DeLongpre's finest 
works, six by J. Bond Francisco, four by 
Prof. Judson, two by Miss Hyer, and a num- 
ber by Miss King, Mrs. Hotchcroft-Hill and 
Mr. McCord of Chicago. 



In the Gay Life 

IV /T K. AND MRS. J. G. MOSSIN of this 
1VJL city celebrated the birthday of Mr. 
Mossin on Sunday last at the Hotel del Coro- 
nadoi and the occasion prompted the San 
Diego Cnion to say: "The event was cele- 
brated in royal style, a dinner party being 
perhaps the most enjoyable feature. Special 
floral decorations graced the table set apart 
for the dining, and nothing was spared to 
make the occasion one to remember, for Mr. 
Mossin was the recipient of many presents, 
mirth-provoking, it not particularly costly or 
elaborate. He will save the gifts for decora- 
tion of a next year's Christmas tree at one of 
the Los Angeles Sunday-schools in which he 
is interested." Among those celebrating with 
Mr. and Mrs. Mossin were the following 
ladies and gentlemen from this city: Mr. and 
Mrs. W. G. Nevin, W. G. Nevin, Jr., Miss 
Nevin, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Porter, Hugh Por- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter S. Newhall, Mr. and Mrs Granville 
MacGowan, Mr. and Mrs. G. Holterhoff and 
Mr. M. L. Graff. 

Mr. Arthur W. Fisher of 146 South Flower 
street was the host Saturday evening of an 
elegantly appointed stag dinner, given in 
honor of his brother, Mr. Emil Fisher, of 
Meriden, Conn., and had as his guests the 
members of the Monte Cristo Mining Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Fisher is president. The 
table decorations consisted of a beautiful cen- 
terpiece and a tall vase supporting quantities 
of long-stemmed roses, forming an exquisite 
table setting. The mantel was banked with 
bright red geraniums and graceful vines, and 
in the spacious drawing rooms roses were used 
in profusion. At the conclusion of the dinner 
the guests occupied a box at the Orpheum. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miner took up their sum- 
mer residence at the Arcadia, Santa Monica, 
on Saturday last and will remain until Sep- 
tember. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abe Jacoby of the Van Nuys 
have gone to Santa Monica for the rest of the 
summer. 

Mrs. J. Ross Clark, accompanied by her 
son, left here for Butte, Montana, on Wednes- 
day last. 

Among the many visitors at Santa Monica 
Sunday was the veteran, T. I). Mott. 

Hon. Erskine M. Ross and Mrs. Ross are 
among the permanent summer guests at the 
Arcadia, where they will stay until the Judge 
leaves for Portland a month or two hence. 
Their son is the author of a little poem which 
the editor of the GRAPHIC wished to publish, 
but the young gentleman said: "Poco 
tiempo." 

Miss Kcho Allen, a great favorite in Los 
Angeles society, who has been in New York 
and elsewhere in the East for six months, re- 
turned home Thursday. 

Mrs. Van Nuys, who has been spending a 
few days at Redondo Beach, has returned. 

Mis. Milner and the Misses Milner are 
contemplating a month or more at Santa 
Catalina. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris Newmark have ar- 
ranged for a Hawaiian trip in September. 

Mrs. W. M. Shore of Butte, Mont., is visit- 
ing her sister, Mrs. H. L Corson of 124 South 
Flower street. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Preuse are at their 
Santa Monica cottage for a few weeks, but 
will soon go to a pretty place in the Santa 
Cruz mountains for a month or more. Mrs. 
Preues's many friends regret her departure as 
a positive loss of much sunshine, but the 
denizens of Ben Lomond will be the merrier 
as her infectious laugh reverberates through 
the giant redwoods, and her Santa Monica 
admirers will abide the sacrifice. 

Mrs. Modini Wood is again a sojourner in 
the city of wild northwest wind-, hut will re- 
turn in a few days. 

Among the guests at the Arcadia are Cap- 
tain McCalla, U. S. N , and Mrs. McCalla, a 
daughter of General Sargent of Santa Monica. 
Captain McCalla is commandant of the navy 
yard at Portsmouth, N. H 

Mrs. M. A. Wilcox and Mrs. Mary Long- 
street, accompanied by Alfred Wilcox, will go 
to Santa Monica on the first of August to stay 
a month or more. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Newmark took up 
their residence for the rest of the summer at 
Santa Monica on Saturday last at the Wooll- 
acott cottage on Ocean avenue. 

Mrs. Plater and Miss Waddilove will join 
the gay caravan of society people at the Ar- 
cadia on or about the fifteenth of August. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cahn, who are enthusiastic 
admirers of Santa Monica over all other sea- 
side resorts in America, took possession of 
their cottage there on Saturday last. 

Among the functionaries who went down 
to Santa Monica on Sunday last to study up 
the Glass contempt case with Garrett of the 
Record, was Louis Vetter, who is a jolly good 
fellow, but a strict disciplinarian all the 
same. 

Senator and Mrs. Bates, who have been 
the guests of their daughter, Mrs. O. W. Childs, 
for a month or more, departed for Tennessee 
during the week. 

Dr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick and family have 
gone to Terminal Island — where they have a 
cottage — for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis left thei;- 
Main street home for Redondo Beach on 
Thursday where they will remain until their 
fine mansion on Nineth street is completed. 

W. C. Paterson and family have gone to 
Terminal and will occupy their cottage by the 
tea until October. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Carpenter and family 
go to Redondo today and occupy their cottage 
two months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumner P. Hunt took posses- 
sion of their cottage at Terminal last week 
and will remain until October. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Gaffey have taken 
possefsion of the Baker cottage at Santa 
IVjonica. 

Mt en of Kentucky is reported to be under 
water, and it may be taken for granted that 
the people down there not only feel injured 
but insulted. 

:>•>::»::» >:>:>:»>::»e».:»:»:>:> .»»: «;•*••:«: >.»:«•«. »•* :«::< « *X». 

WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 



ICB 



-J^ASTI-RN 



1ST. E. A . 



To be had for Men or Boys 

AT IIIK dCl — 



LONDON CLOTHING CO. 

I 19 to 125 N. Sprinfl St. 

HARRIS & PRANK, Props. 



Western Graoliic 



THE COMING MAN AND WOMAN. 

FROM a class of half a dozen that used to 
hold their exercises in the principal's 
room of the old high school on the court 
house hill twenty years ago, the graduating 
class of this summer, 1899, has reached the 
number of one hundred and twenty-five young 
men and women, ("boys and girls" they 
were then) with the commencement exer- 
cises, of necessity, in Hazard's Pavilion, 
the largest auditorium in the city. It is 
an interesting retrospect for those who were 
of the old high school to think of the transi- 
tion from the days of "base" and "shinny" 
and "sides" to thepe'days of grace with their 
tennis and golf and "frats." But reminis- 
cences are not so material as matters of the 
present and a sight of the tiers of bright and 



bade goodbye to high school; some to go away 
to college or university, some to plunge into 
the work of the world, and others, of the fair 
sex, will ere long change their names and 
take up life's burden with mind and body 
equipped to make light of the struggle. 

THE REVIVAL OF THE SANTA MONICA 
ROAD RACE' 

IF ANYTHING could be devised that would 
cause more bruises and make men dirtier 
than a road race, those who witnessed the 
Fourth of July event over the new Santa 
Monica course would prefer to escape it. To 
stand in the jamming, seething crowd at the 
finish tape and look at the poor fellows as 
they came in panting and struggling, covered 
with perspiration, every drop of which had 
been converted into a correspondingly larger 
drop of mud by the addition of dust, was 
enough to suggest the terrors of a trip to 
hades. Still more surprising than that such 



LAMBDA THETA PHI SORORITY 

Mabel Hill Lucv Rinsabaugh Louler Lord Florence Field 
EmmaWidney Marian Stiinu Florence Clutc 

Charlotte Teale Phila Johnson Isabel God in Shirlev Jenkins Jessie Knepper 

Keturah Paul Blanche EDgstrum Barbara Hitt 

Kuth Bosbyshell Katherine Thompson Josephine Lewis Margaret Cornwell Helen North 



handsome faces on the stage of the big pavil- 
ion a week ago Friday evening would have at 
once driven memories of the long ago from 
the head of the most confirmed opposite of 
"Looking Backward." 

Banks and pyramids of flowers in bunches 
and baskets were piled about the stage in the 
greatest profusion, and the distribution of the 
fragrant blossoms to the members of the class 
was an item of the exercises that deserved a 
place on the program. 

The High School Orchestra enlivened the 
proceedings with a number of excellent selec- 
tions until at S:uO the curtain rose and Prof. 
Housh introduced Prof. Duniway of Stan- 
ford, who delivered the commencement ad- 
dress with impressive earnestness. 

Prof. Housh followed with a timely speech 
advocating increased accommodations for 
high school students which won him salvos of 
applause. President Davis spoke from the 
school board's point of view, after which the 
diplomas were awarded and the graduates 



intelligent young men should risk their heart- 
action and necks in the tremendous exertion 
of an eighteen mile race through ruts and 
dust was the fact that after a dip in the surf 
and a rub-down by their faithful followers 
they were the liveliest fellows in town — and it 
isn't a slow town by several points. 

W. Phillips, with an eight minute handi- 
cap, was the first man to cross the tape, his 
actual time being 54:20, as against the lowest 
time, 52:04, made by A. C. Muff, scratch man. 
After the first man was in the others came 
along singly and sprinting in bunches at in- 
tervals of a few seconds to a minute, cheers 
and bravos encouraging them to a last su- 
preme effort in the last hundred yards ; but 
there were many of them that could not make 
their wheels track on the home stretch, an 
evidence of the terrible strain they had been 
under. This race being the first over the 
Ballona road course, there is no way of com- 
paring the time with former runB to the city 
by the sea, but those who know say that it 



was a good race, good time, good management 
and good bye until next Fourth. 

A strong sea breeze made the track races 
in the afternoon a tame affair, but the crowd 
was easily pleased and the contestants good, 
humored — and what more could be wished by 
those interested? 



That was quick work of the New York 
legislature. The members were called together 
in extraordinary session on a Monday for the 
purpose of passing a franchise tax bill, which 
was done on Wednesday. Then a bill appro- 
priating $75,000 for the entertainment of Ad- 
miral Dewey went through and the next night 
the session came to a close. 

Texas democrats seem to have had a 
spasm of common sense. At a mass meeting 
held at El Paso, at which 2,000 are reported 
to have been present, a resolution was adopt* d 
which declared "that whatever difference of 
opinion may exist as to the proper ultimate 





u : 



DELTA IOTA CHI 

Pauline Botts Mary Jeanette Ridgway 

Frances Coulter Elizabeth Laaz 
Adele Brotbeck Inez Moore Rowena Joseph f « 

Ruby Kimble 

disposition of the Philippines, we do earnestly 
insist that such question should follow the 
suppression of the insurrection," and they 
pledged themselves to support the Govern- 
ment until its rightful authority was estab- 
lished in the archipelago. 

Lieutenant-Commander McCrea, a brother 
of Major McCrea of the Farmers' and Mer- 
chants' Bank, has been advanced to his present 
position on account of his splendid services 
off Santiago, and has lately been appointed to 
a responsible position at the Washington 
Navy ^ard. 

The Filippinos are a greatly surprised lot. 
When their Commissioners were in Manila 
they were astonished at the fairness with 
which they were treated by our peace dele- 
gates; when they are in line of battle they 
are astounded at the valor of the American 
troops. Between the form of government of- 
fered at Manila and the sharp prodding Gen. 
Lawton has given them at the front, they 
ought not to be long at in arriving a conclu- 
sion as to which they prefer. 



Western Graphic 




SANTA MONICA 

THIS fashionable seaside resort is nearly 
twenty-five years old, and is quite 
twenty-three this month; for it was twenty- 
three years ago this month — July 21, to be 
strictly accurate — that the first day's sale of 
lots took place here. The first lot sold was 
that corner where the Neptune Garden now is, 
and so on up Ocean avenue to Utah avenue. 
The first bid on this lot was $250, and it was 
knocked down to Sam Hellman for $380. It 



aid and Hen Truman the Star. All three of 
these papers had given the project a good 
send off, editorially and in a business way, 
and their editors were on hand to report pro- 
ceedings and indulge in barbecued meat, 
chicken and sandwiches and native wines and 
cigars provided by Senator Jones and R. S. 
Baker, the owners. 

Building was commenced immediately, 
and in a short time afterward there was a 
number of hotels, a newspaper, a dozen stores, 



9 



wharves, banks, the Santa Fe Railroad, then 
the Electric and many other improvements 
too numerous to mention, until now it is the 
most famous seaside resort south of Mon- 
terey and has more visitors on a Sunday in 
July than Monterey and Santa Cruz can 
register in all the Sundays in July put to- 
gether. 

Last Sunday may be said to have been 
the real opening of the season so far as a 
good big crowd was concerned, and the air 
and sunshine had conspired to present a per- 
fection of atmosphere, and all who came were 
satisfied in every way. All were loud in their 
praise of the fine improvements made at the 
North Beach Bath House, which has been 
newly painted and otherwise renovated in 
every part. Potted palms and huge hanging 
baskets and shrubs and fl owers make the in- 
terior extremely inviting. But, better than 
all, complete arrangements have been made 





TY 



rpham 

a Pollard Mary Iaabelle Coulter 
re Elsie Leslie Kimble 

liet Phelps 



Olin Wellborn, Jr 
C. De Forrest Howry W. Davisson 



PHI SIGMA FRATERNITY 

Fred W. Forrester Hiram Tibbots Virgil W. Owen Hamilton Fay Edw. C. Bosbyshell 
Clarke Brtggs Harry W. Walton Roy P. Hillman Dr. E. M. Pallette A. 0. Martin Walter L. Krug 
Geo. MoLain F.arle C. Anthony Lewis Everett John T. Coopei Ham. N. Bonsai! 



is now valued at about $9,00C without the im- 
provements, and the occupants pay a rental 
of nearly $100 per month. The inside lots on 
Ocean avenue sold for from $400 to $500 each 
and lots on Third street brought between $150 
and $250. Major Hancock, who then owned 
the Brea Ranch (he died many years ago), 
bid in a lot on Third street for $140. The 
late Judge J. S. Mallard bought three Third 
street lots for $800 a few months after they 
had been knocked down to a man for $450. 
The late Judge O'Melveny took in an Ocean 
avenue lot for $380, and the late W. J. Brod- 
rick caught up one for $360. The auctioneer 
was E. W. Noyes, still a resident of Los An- 
geles; and his partner, a man named Jones, 
now dead, was clerk of the sale, and the first 
bid was offered by an Englishman named 
Bullock, now living in England. Tom Fitch 
opened the sale by one of his silvery speeches 
and there was an exhuberance manifested at 
the start. Jim Ayers was editor of the Ex- 
press at that time, Joe Lynch edited the Her- 



restaurants and a club house. It was not 
long before a railroad was running between 
Los Angeles and Santa Monica, and San 
Francisco steamers stopped regularly. The 
railroad was built by Joseph Crawford, now 
in the east, the lots having been laid out by a 
man named Jackson who died here in Novem- 
ber, 1896. In 1876, one year after the sale, 
there was a population of nearly 700, not in- 
cluding 200 people at the hotels. Even in 
1876 numbers of people came from San Fran- 
cisco to Santa Monica to enjoy the beautiful 
climate. Crawford got up pony races, ball 
matches, tournaments and other attractions 
holidays and Sundays, and even at that early 
day a thousand or more people could be seen 
at the beach on such occasions. 

In a short time new bathing houses were 
built, additional railway facilities were pro- 
vided and the streets were graded and many 
miles of sidewalk were constructed. Then 
came the Arcadia Hotel, the great North 
Beach Bath house, the big wharf, other 



with the new electric and power company to 
furnish light, heat and constantly changing 
warm salt water at all times — that is to say, 
there will be a big stream of water from the 
sea all the time; and so that no one may 
doubt it Roy Jones is going to have an arc 
light located under or near the stream so that 
all can see it pouring in at all times. Thous- 
ands of new suits of the latest pattern and 
miles of new toweling have been added to the 
plant, and all the showering booths have been 
arranged at the north end of the dressing 
rooms, so that one may boast of the North 
Beach Bath House as being the equal of any 
in the State in point of cleanliness, conven- 
ience and agreeablene8s. 

Eckert & Hopf were up to their eyes and 
ears in work from ten in the morning until 
that hour at night, and many a hundred fish 
dinner was got away with. 

The Arcadia took care of more than twc 
hundred people at lunch and dinner on Sun- 
day not to count the multitude that swarmed 



16 



Western Graphic 



in and out of the new grill room which is in 
many respects the neatest and coolest and 
most delightful on the Pacific coast. 

The music drew an immense crowd, and 
he electric road ran trains with trailers every 
fifteen minutes jammed each way from ten in 
the morning until late at night. 

The celebration of the Fourth was more 
pretentious than anything of the kind ever 
attempted here before, and most of the places 
of business had been artistically decorated 
with flags and other national colors, so that 
the effect was highly patriotic. There was a 
fine procession at 1 o'clock, some of the floats 
and fire department truck being conspicuously 
attractive. The order of the parade was as fol- 
lows: 

Squad of police, City Marshal Max Barreto com- 
manding 

Grand Marshal J. J. Carillo and aide, 
mounted 
Los Angeles Military Band 
Santa Monica fire department, 
George B. Baxter, foreman 
Mexican war veterans in carriage 
City trustees in carriage 
"Awkward Squad," 
Thomas Mobley commanding 
American Fife and Drum Corps 
Advertising floats representing North Beach 
Bath house, Heim Bros, and A. B. Benson 
Home Guards, mounted 

The aids to the grand marshal were George 
E. Williams, George Suits, T. H. Dudley, F. 



day. It was really a great occasion for Santa 
Monica and way ahead of any other one not 
even excepting Crawley's whale day, which 
was a record breaker. 

The finish of the road race caused a mass- 
ing of people on Ocean avenue, between 9 and 
10, and when W. Phillips came up the goal 
first and won the first prize a great shout rent 
the air. PhillipB was allowed an eight minute 
handicap. The best time made was by C. A. 
Muff in 52:04. The third prize was won by 
B. R. Stanfield; time 53:10. The winners of 
the best and second time also won a gold and 
silver medal respectively. Over one hundred 
started and the contest was fine throughout. 

Golf formed one of the Fourth of July 
features and an exciting game was played. 
The men players were Hugh May, C. E. Maud, 
W. Cosby. E. J. Tufts, R. H. Chapman, E. D. 
Silent, R. J. C. Wood, R. H. H. Chapman, 
Ro3S Smith, Guy Cochran, W. H. Young, M. 

E. Flowers, H. P. Anderson, A. W. Bumiller, 
M. G. Burmester, Fred Flint, E. Conde Jones, 
W, A. Tufts, J. Bumiller, J. H. Nichols, T. D. 
Connelly, M. T. Manning and D. J. Van de 
Van. The ladies were Mesdames Otheman 
Stevens, Upham, E. D. Silent, E. L. Waring, 

F. Flint, Guy Cochran, Connelly, Young, and 
Miss B. Crouch and Miss M. Jones. Mrs. 
Upham won, Mrs. Waring tied Bogy, Mrs. Si- 
lent and Miss Crouch played a tie. Hugh May 




FINISH OF THE FOURTH OF JULY ROAD RACE, OCEAN AVENUE, 8ANTA MOXICA-W. Phillips winning first place. 



B. McComas, E. B. Hatheway, M. G. Bur- 
mester, John Connelly, Fred Chatfield, L. B. 
Osborn, W. L. Muller, H. X. Goetz and Jessie 
Yoakum. 

Miss Atala Carrillo rode a fine horse carry- 
ing a flag representing one her grandmother 
helped to make in San Diego in 1846, and 
said to have been the first one made in Cali- 
fornia. 

There were fireworks from two different 
places, and much music and merriment all 
day and well into the night. 

The beaches for more than two miles were 
massed with human beings, and at about 12 
o'clock the sight around the lunch tables and 
improvised boards was something that cannot 
be fairly described. Thousands went into the 
water either inside or outside the North Beach 
pavilion, and all the principal streets were 
crowded with merry makers throughout the 



won in the gentlemen's 18 hole handicap against 
Bogy. 

A tally-ho party which rode down from 
Los Angeles Wednesday afternoon and took 
dinner in the grill room at Hotel Arcadia con- 
sisted of the following: Mr. and Mrs. Halli- 
day, Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Jones, Mrs. W. A. 
Barker, Miss Chanslor, Miss Serris, Misses 
and Lila Fairchild; Messrs. John D. Mott, 
Charles Henderson, Horace Henderson, Fred 
Henderson, W. G. Chanslor, Ray Fairchild 
and John J. Fay Jr. After passing a pleasant 
evening at the beach the party drove back to 
Los Angeles. 

REDONDO BEACH 

THE informal hop given on the evening 
of the Fourth was the most notewor- 
thy event at Redondo this week and was a 
thoroughly enjoyable affair. The younger 
guests entered enthusiastically into the spirit 



of the occasion and a number of Los Angeles 
society men were present giving zest to the 
dancing. The ball room was suitably decor- 
ated with national flags and the orchestra 
adapted national airs to two-steps and waltzes. 
The dance closed with a good old fashioned 
"Old Dan Tucker" in which all joined, and 
altogether it was the jolliest hop of the sea- 
son. 

Arrangements are being made for giving a 
grand open, handicap tennis tournament on 
the Redondo courts July 20, 21 and 22, in- 
cluding men's and women's singles, men's 
and women's doubles, and mixed doubles. 
Handsome prizes will be awarded in each 

SANTA MONICA 

I Hotel Arcadia ss&sisr I 

r The New Grill 1 

X Room » 

The Dining % 
Room 5, 
I The l'arlors T. 
I All Look ■' 
Toward tha Sea X 

It seems to me I'd like to go ?• 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles hlow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound 
And I'd have stillness all aiouud. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's sursiy where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well: 
But when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lots the best. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue, 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

—Eugene Field, adapted 




i 

t 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 



% Frank A, 
I Trop. 



Mille 




Ocean 
Park 



HOMES 

BY THE SE>fl 

KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Elegant beach, Water piped to tract. 
Electric light connection. Long lease, 510 to S25 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever Offered to secure a :-anta 
Monica Home 

Ocean Air Ocean Beach Ocean Bathing 

L. B. OSBORN, Agent 

OfRce, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



Fine Fish 



\ Dinners \ 

No tourist considers a visit to California 

/ complete until he has visited Santa Monica and ' 

■ no one seeking a Summer Kesort thinks of over- 

/ looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ez- ' 

„ tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, 

I mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc., which are to be ' 

< obtained at the famous restaurant, overlooking 

/ the ocean. ' 

) THE PAVILION i 

y ECKERT & HOPF, Props. j 



The North Beach 
Bath House 



Has perfected an arrangement by 
which the water in the plunge will be entirely 
chaDged daily. This year a great deal of money 
has been put into permanent improvements in 
and around the bath house and it will be the 
aim of the management to cater to the best class 
of people, by providing eyerything for their 
comfort and convenience. We may say to our 
old patrons that they will hardly recognize the 
place on account of changes for the better. 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



event and the courts will be kept in readiness 
for practice and free to all intending to enter 
the tournament until it comes off. Entries 
should be made on or before the 19th — either 
at the hotel or with R. A. Rowan, 214 Wilcox 
building, Los Angeles, where all information 
in regard to the tournament may be found. 
There will be a full dress ball given in con- 
nection with the event Saturday evening, 
July 22nd. 

Misses Marie and Alice Markharn enter- 
tained at their cottage on the Fourth with a 
house party. Among the gentlemen present were 

SANTA CAT A LIN A ISLAND 



§ anta Gatalina islan d 



Throe and one-lialf hours from l.oa Angeles 

The Greatest Kesort 

The Loveliest Season of the Year 

Climate near Perfection 

Phenomenal Fishing and Hunting 

The great Stage Ki<le 



Moderx HOTEL 

METROPOLE | 



Appointments 



I'uique exclusive attractions 

The Famed Marine Gardens as viewed 

from the glass bottomed boa s 
The best and most picturesque Golf Links 
Round trip every day from Los Angeles 
Sunday excursions, three hours on the Island 
See K. K. time tables 

For full information, illustrated pamphle's and 
rates apply to 



BANNING CO. 

Tel. M 36 222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 

i*^. 1 *^.'*^'*^ '<eV^ ^.^^ 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE. GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 




Hotel jrsT Completed .^i—^M^ 
Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 



~ Hath 

Kdffi tie 



house in eonnec- 
Finest 



Hates S3 to *4 a day gSg Hon with hotel. Finesi 

Special rates on 53K beach and surf bathing 01 

application g28 ?" ast - <\ olf 1 " ,k9 ' l» ch <. # 
Kr 5Xi<= nig, fishing. Ten miles of % 

S. P. Anderson m j^HfiEg alonB beach $ 

Manager ^} «> 

The Attractive Route 



To the Favorite Sea Side 
Resorts is the 



Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




• Terminal Island, BytheSea 

Catalina Island San Pedro 
Long Beach, 

Are the favorite and 
most delightful places 
and only n short ride from Los Angeles, where can be 
found the finest Open Sea Bathing, Yachting and 
Finning on the Pacific coast. a 
Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket W 
Office, 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. 
8. B. Hynes, Gen. Mgr. T. C. Peck, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept. 



Loyd'Macey and Ed. Groenendyke of Pasa- 
dena, and Hob Kimball, Los Angeles. 

The usual Monday evening plunge party 
was given for the guests at the hotel this week 
and the occasion was very festive as there are 
now so many young people here who are ex- 
pert swimmers that the plunge parties are not 
only popular with them but afford an amusing 
spectacle for the uninitiated. A Dutch supper 
was served in the dining room upon the re- 
turn to the hotel. 

Mr. Alfred Solano, who has been in Ari- 
zona upon a business trip, returned Tuesday. 

Among Los Angeles society men spending 
the week at Redondo are Fred A. Kimble and 
Homer Laughlin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. I). D. Acker of The Palms 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. R Warner 
over Sunday and expect to return later in the 
month for an extended stay. 

Mrs. P. M. Page and son, who are occupy- 
ing their summer cottage here, have gone to 
Pasadena for a few days and Mr. Page will 
from there make a trip into the mountains 
for fishing. 

Mrs. J. B. Ridgeway and daughters have 
taken possession of the Teed cottage for the 
summer. 

G. W. Parsons was the guest Sunday of 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Lewis at their pretty sum- 
mer home. 

The regular hop this evening at the hotel 
will conclude with a few figures of the ger- 
man. 

This week's arrivals include: 

Mrs J E Buffington, James W BuffiDfrton, Mrs 
Jean G Donovan, Catherine Donovan, Miss Lewis, 
Mrs M E Gibson, Miss Cora Mulholland, St Louis; 
Mr and Mrs Robt D Osburn and daughter, Mr and 
Mrs E P Clark, Riverside; Mrs H M Dreer, Miss 
Dreer, Mrs Gardiner, F C Bolt, Miss Bolt, Dr and 
Mrs F C Mattison, Pasadena; Miss Elizabeth H 
Wainwright, Lee Armstrong, Mr and Mrs H Leon- 
ard, Walter Turnbull, San Francisco; Chas O Pratt, 
Santa Monica; Mr and Mrs C G Bentbye, London, 
Eng; Mr and Mrs S A Barrett, Patton; Mr and Mrs 
D D Acker, The Palms; W H Walby, Miss Walby, 
Adrian, Michigan; W E Mitchell, Philadelphia; The- 
odore Royer, Piiiua, Ohio; Mr and Mrs R S Smith, 
Miss Doll Reynolds, Miss Jennie Sayre, Santa Ana; 
Dr R P Fox, Madison, Wise; C M Love, W E Fer- 
traden, N Y; Miss Anna Loda, Salt Lake; Mrs James 
Al^'er and daughter, Miss Carrie Cushing, Oakland; 
Mr and Mrs C W Blaisdell, Miss Head, F A Brad- 
shaw, Dr Follingsbee, Raymond Moore. I Benton 
Van Nuys. Mrs I H Van Nuys, Dr and Mrs T Jeff 
White, Mr and Mrs G W. Lincoln, Mrand Mrs Irving 
Hayes Rice, Fred A Kimble, Homer Laughlin Jr, 
Mrs James Fulton, H J Schroder, F I Herron, Mrs 
R H Herron, Mr and Mrs E R Kellam, Miss Dorsey, 
Miss Mullin, J G Kaston, Sam Haskins. Cyril Wig- 
more, Carol Allen, Miss Bishop, Karl Klokke, Mr and 
Mrs Morgan Smith, Mr and Mrs Chas D Baker, Mr 
and Mrs W (' Bailey, Los Angeles; Miss Helen Rior- 
dan, Flagstaff, Arizona. 



REDONDO 



TERMINAL ISLAND 

THE new hotel at Terminal Island, known 
as the Gordon Arms, of which much has 
heretofore been said in this paper, was for- 
mally opened to the public on Saturday last, 
July 1, and was dedicated with a very Bwell 
party in the evening, which was attended by 
over two hundred of the most prominent 
people in Southern California. 

Mr. S. P. Anderson, the wide awake, capable 
hotel man, who opened the Van Nuys for Mr. 
Potter, is in charge of affairs at the hotel, and 
already the first week of business promises a 
very bright future for the house and indicates 
that it will be one of the most valuable 
adjuncts toward assisting in increasing Ter- 
minal Island in popular favor aB a summtr 
resort. 

Many who attended the ball on Saturday 

Concluded on Page 15. 



VVYVVV«VV«V«VVVV VVVVVVVVV VVVVV VVV V 



mi 



3» 

J» 
J» 
1» 
>» 

3» 

a 
J» 
J» 
J» 

m ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 
£ FBO.n LOS ANGELES 





* Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 



Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn- 
aments. 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 

Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 

Transient Kates *•;..-,(> I ,, * I . 



ft Special Weekly Kates 
3» 



H. R. WARNKR, Prop. 



***<ititititit»»inmntinnnnnnnnnnnnninnnt 




Santa Fe Route J 



Summer Time Table 

Daily Seiivk k 

9.55 a. m. 1.30 p, in. 
In. 35 a. in. 2.10 p. in. 



5.86 p. m. 
6 10 p. m. 



7 00 p. in. 

7 40 p. m. 
x.00 p. m. 



Leaves Los Angeles 
Arrhes at Kedondo 

Sunday Service 
Leaves Los Angeles K.30 a. m. 9.55 a. m. 

1.30 p. in. 5.35 p. ra. 
Arrives at Redordo 9.10 a. m. 10 35 a. m. 

2.10 p.m. 6.10 p.m. 
Last Train Retaining Leaves Kedondo 

Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



bos flnoeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4, 1899! 9 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 
Every day 9.30 a m 1.30 p m 
Sundays ».l<i h hi 9 30 a in 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 
Trains leave Kedondo for Los Angeles 
Everyday x.nn a m 11. 00am 
Sundays 7.00 a in s.«K) a m 

11.00 a m 4.15 pm > i> p m 
Theater Irani Saturday night leaves Kedondo li 30 p in 
returning leaves Los Ange ■■■ 11.30 p m 

Hi] Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

L.J. PERRY, Superintendent 



4 



5.30 p m 
in 18 n in 
7.00 p. m 

4.15 p m 
8.80 a m. 
IB p m 



BUNOY'S 

Klsinore 



Hotel, Hath Mouse and 
Cottages Lighted by Acety- 
lene Gas. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at IheHpilngs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z. BUNDY, Prop 

Hates per week -8«,S9, and «10, lnclud- ELSINORE 

CAL. 



lug Mot Sulphur Baths. 
lUlnptlVM taken 



No Con- 



12 



Western Graphic 




Cable pleasures 




IT SEEMS to me that the bargain hunter 
makes a mistake when she doesn't turn 
her steps toward the markets in these days. 
For there are many things to be found therein 
that can be depended on to furnish a contin- 
uous performance gratifying to the palate and 
at the same time make no inroads on the re- 
serve fund one has stowed away in the corner 
of one's purse. 

To begin with there is poultry to be had at 
as low a figure as anyone with a spark of con- 
sideration for the farmer could wish. So it is 
a good time for trying new ways of preparing 
this commodity, don't you think? Suppose 
you give this suggestion a trial: Cut a chicken 
up as for a ragout and boil it in as little water 
as will cover it, seasoning the water with a 
small onion, salt, white pepper and a gill of 
sherry wine. When the chicken is almost 
tender enough, drain it from the liquor and 
let it get perfectly cold. Meanwhile have in a 
stewpan half a gill of olive oil with a pinch 
of minced onion and a little salt and pepper. 
When this is quite hot and the chicken quite 
cold, cook the chicken in it to a delicate 
brown. Dish the chicken when it is browned 
evenly and pour over it a sauce made by add- 
ing a gill of the stock in which it was boiled 
to the oil in the stewpan and thickening it 
all with the yolks of two eggs. This makes a 
most delicious dish and is well worth the 
trial. The frying in oil gives it its distinctive 
flavor, and makes it very different from fowl 
fried in butter; which is in France always 
called poulet sautee, to mark the difference. 

And this same dish can be varied a little 
by using tomatoes with the chicken. After 
the chicken has been fried in the oil, lay it on 
fried tomatoes and then pour the sauce over 
all. Have the tomatoes as large as possible 
and not too ripe; slice them, dust them with 
salt and pepper and fry very, very slowly in 
a little oil till they are cooked; but don't let 
the slices get out of shape. 

If you think you would prefer a roast of 
poultry, do try some of the ducks to be had 
now. Roast them in any way that experience 
has taught you is the best, but when it comes 
to making the sauce for them let me have a 
word to say. Mince two or three slices of 
bacon and a small onion and fry them to- 
gether for five minutes; add to them the juice 
of an orange and a wineglassful of port wine, 
the drippings from the pan in which the ducks 
were roasted and a seasoning of salt and 
pepper. It's an ideal dish, that's what it is. 
And you might accompany it or follow it 
with another that is particularly seasonable, 
namely, broiled deviled tomatoes. First you 
maBh the yolks of three hard boiled eggs, then 
you mix with them a saltspoonful of salt, one 
teaspoonful each of powdered sugar and mus- 
tard, and as much cayenne as your taste calls 
for; then stir in three ounces of melted butter, 
and when all the ingiedients are well blended 
add three tablespoonfuls of vinegar. At this 
stage put the mixture over the fire to reach 
the boiling point and stir in two well beaten 
eggs. When it has thickened a bit stand in 
hot water on the stove to keep warm while 
you give a little attention to the tomatoes. 



These must be ripe and firm. Cut them in 
half-inch slices, broil over a clear fire, place 
them over a hot dish, pour the sauce over 
them and there you are. This makes a really 
appetizing breakfast dish as well as a savory 
dinner course. Try it some morning, having 
with it crisp broiled bacon and some dainty 
rice muffins, and you will find yourself con- 
siderably above par with your household for 
the rest of that day at least. 

And in a day or so follow up the good 
impression by having at luncheon tomatoes 
prepared in this way. Cut some round slices 
of bread and fry them delicately in butter 
till they are brown. Slice firm ripe tomatoes 
to match the sizes of the bread slices; broil 
the tomatoes just a wee wit, and then lay a 
slice on each piece of the French bread. Sea- 

SUNDAY, JULY 9 

BREAKFAST 

Strawberries 
Pompano 
Beefsteak and Onions 
Coffee and Rolls 

DINNEK 

Oyster Cocktail 
Green Turtle Soup 
Shrimp Salad Olives 
RieeliDg 
Lake Trout 
Cold Turkey Cold Ham 

Squabs Sweetbread 
Asparagus Mayonaise Peas 
Zinfandel 

Roast Young Duck with Currant Jelly 
Celery Lettuce 
Orange Jelly Raspberries Ice Cream 
Swiss Cheese Nuts Raisins Coffee 

SUPPEK 

Meat Souffle 
Nasturtium Sandwiches Berries 
Crackers Cheese Chocolate 

THE BOARDING HOUSE SHORTCAKE 

Sing a song of shortcake, 
Dough three inches through; 

Four and twenty strawberries 
For a hungry crew. 

When the cake is opened 

And is passed around 
Just about one berry in 

Each dry piece is found. 



son them with pepper and salt, scatter grated 
Parmesan cheese over them, then spread them 
with a layer of fine breadcrumbs moistened 
with melted butter. Brown in a hot oven and 
serve piping hot. And if the man o' the 
house is the right sort you will get a vote of 
thanks in the shape of a monster bunch of 
carnations or La France roses. Try it. 



BITS ABOUT COOKING 

Franck is called the cradle of good cook- 
ing, but Athens was the home of the best 
cooks that the world ever knew. Athenius 
called the cooks the first race of kings. 

Cooking is largelj' a matter of taste, but 
the best cooks in the land today are men. 
Our own Southern colored women are real 
cordon-bleus; the black cooks of Cuba are 
peerless, and no traveler who has visited Con- 
stantinople or Algeria would take a chef if he 
could get a Moor. 

Marc Anthony gave the cook who prepared 
he banquet he gave in Cleopatra's honor a 



city. Julius Caesar paid his cook $4,000 a 
year. 

Empress Josephine ate most of her meals 
in her own apartment and rewarded the cook 
who prepared them with magnificently em- 
broidered shawls, thread laces, hats that cost 
$50 apiece and silk slippers that sold for al- 
most as much second hand. 

Napoleon's table manners were very bad. 
He not only ate with his fingers but put them 
into the dishes in serving himself; made a8 
much noise as a suction pump in drinking, 
ate with doggish rapacity, finished the biggest 

RETAIL MARKETS. SATURDAY, .JULY 8 



MEATS AND 

Prime Rib Roast 15c 

Leg of Mutton 12Je 

Hind Quarter Lamb. ..$1.25 

Fore " " 75c 

Pork Loin Rtast 12Jc 

Pork Sausage 12Jc 

Hamburger " 

Bologna " 

Weinerwurst " 

Liverwurst " 

Porterhouse 22J to 25c 



SAUSAGES 

Tenderloin 16@Ufc 

Sirloin 15c 

Round 12Jc 

Mutton Chops 121c 

Lamb Chops 20c 

Pork (/hops 12i@15c 

Corned Beef 8@10c 

Salt Pork 10@12Jc 

Ham, best 12c 

Bacon, best 12c 

Lard 12Jc 



POULTRY, FISH AND GAME 

Broilers 40fa65c Rock Cod. lb 10c 

Fryers 50@65c Cockles, lb 2@3c 

Roasters 70c Shrimps, lb 15c 

Hens 40(a.<V>c Roe, lb 10c 

Ducks 60c Eastern Oysters, qt 60c 

Turkeys, lb 20c Morgan Oysters, qt 65c 

Geese, lb 20c Halibut, lb 8@10c 

Squab, pair 35c Yellowtail.lb 8tol0c 

Sea Bass, lb 10c Salmon, lb 15(a) 20c 

Shad, lb 15c Crabs.each 20@25e 

Baracuda.lb 10c Clams, lb 2©3c 

BUTTER, EGGS AND CHEESE 

Butter, best, roll 55c Pineapple. 4J lb 85c 

tub, lb 25c " small 45c 

Eggs, doz 20c Soft French Cream 10c 

Cheese, California 20c Sierra 10c 

Cheese, Martins, N.Y...20c German Breakfast 6c 

Imoorted Swiss 35c Ohio Swiss 25" 

VEGETABLES 

Potatoes, lb 2Jc Artichokes, doz 30c 

Sweet potatoes, lb 5c String beans, lb 5c 

Cucuml) -rs, doz 30c Cabbage, per head 5c 

Egg Plant, lb 10c Onions, lb 2Jc 

Radishes, bunch B|e Turnips, bunch 5c 

Tomatoes, lb 5c Beets, bunch 5c 

Green Peppers lb 10c Asparagus, lb 7Jc 

Carrots, bunch 5c Watercress, bunch 5c 

Peas, lb 5c Mint, bunch 5c 

Lettuce, bunch 2Jc Summer squash, lb 3c 



I'RUITS A 

Apples, fancy, lb 8c 

Apples, cooking, lb...4(ai6c 

Oranges, per doz L0@20 

Fancy Valencia,doy..25(g*50 

Limes, doz 15c 

Lemons, doz 10@15c 

Honolulu Bananas, doz 25c 

Rhubarb, lb 3@4c 

• irape fruit, each 5c 

Eng. Walnuts. lb 12Jc 

Almonds, lbs l~)@2f> 

Pecans, lb 15c 

Mixed nuts, lb 15c 

Peaches, lb 5(3)74c 

Pears, lb 10c 



ND NUTS 

Strawberries, box 5@I5c 

Blackberries, lb 5@7Jc 

Raspberries, lb 10c 

Loganberries, lb "ie 

Cherries, lb 15c 

Loquats, lb 7Jc 

Figs, lb 10(al5c 

Apricots, lb 5c 

Currants, lb 15c 

Olives, quart 25@40c 

Pineapples, each 25(8/50c 

Coeoanuts, each 10c 

Grapes, lb 10c 

Plums, lb 3@7Jc 

Canteloupes, lb 10^20c 



DRINK 

GLEN 



ROCK 



A Pure Mountain Spring 2 



Main Office Nowberry's Crystal Water 
216S. Spring St. 




E LMS 

Detective 
Agency 

Will undertake all legitimate Detective work intrusted 
to It by Kailroads or Corporations, Hunks, Mer- 
cantile Houses, Attorneys Private, Individuals 

Special facilities for operating in the East and abroad 

Very best of relerences D r:i_,„ „. . . 

Tel. Mam 518 Jll0. P. Elms, Principal 

Rooms 1 1 2- 1 1 3- 1 42 Wilson Block, Los Angeles 




LADIES j* * 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Chemist 

222: ^^Price 50 cts, 

North Main Street 



Western Graphic 



13 



meal in less than twenty minutes and ex- 
pected everybody to follow him when he left 
the table. 



FAVORITE DISHES 

There was nothing Napoleon was so fond 
of as boiled mutton with onion sauce, and he 
frequently indulged his taste to such an extent 
as to make himself ill. 

George III also loved boiled mutton and 
turnips. 

Queen Elizabeth made her breakfasts and 
suppers off of salt beef and ale. In contrast, 
Mary Queen of Scots, whose tastes were 
French, had a most dainty table and was 
luxurious in the extreme. 

James I liked a Scottish dish, cockie- 
leekie. Charles, his son, entertained lavishly. 
He kept two dozen castles always open and 
ready for him and would have hundreds of 
guests to dinner. Five hundred dishes were 
always served. 

The famous Dr. Johnson liked overdone 
boiled pork, veal pie, with raisins and sugar, 
and plum pudding, covered with lobster sauce. 

Plants in the Philippines 

Though the Philippines are an agricultural 
country they do not produce enough food for 
the consumption of the inhabitants, and it is 
the custom to draw upon rice-producing coun- 
tries such as Cochin-China. 

Eighteen thousand acres, or one-ninth of 
the area of the islands, is devoted to agriculture, 
and with better methods the productiveness of 
the soil will be very much increased. Rice is 
the most important food grown, more than 
a hundred varieties being raised, the annual 
production being 30,000,000 bushels. 

Maize and sweet potatoes are next to rice 
in importance as Philippine foods. Fruits, 
especially bananas, grow abundantly. Sugar 



is grown in quantities, but the manufacturing 
methods are crude and the marketable result 
is inferior. 

Indigo used to be an important product. 
Coffee does well, but is not of extra fine qual- 
ity. Of course, tobacco is grown, and while 
spices and medicinal plants thrive the natives 
do not know much about them. 



Francis Truth, the healer who fled from 
San Francisco, leaving many of his "patients" 
in the lurch for fees advanced, explained the 
matter at Keene, N.H., where he was found, 
by saying that his customers would lose no- 
thing, as he proposed to give them "absent 
treatment." The patients are to be congratu 
lated that services will be continued at old 
rates, $5 a month. 

Various learned doctors told the pure- food 
convention lately held in Chicago that borax 
is one of the healthiest things known to man; 
that it acts as a disinfectant to the blood, 
causes cessation of g?rm life, aids digestion 
and is in general worth anybody's eating. 
It seems a pity, with borax so uheap and so 
abundant, that these things were not known 
before. Borax a la mode with potato pan- 
cakes, roast borax with onions, borax fricassee 
with green peas and borax pie will doubtless 
become essential additions to every restaurant 
bill of fare, and no banquet will be complete 
without a magnificent joint of juicy borax 
smoking in the center of the table. 

In the London Daily News' "memorial 
edition of the Dickens novels" there is given 
in detail the money the author received for 
his early works. For "Pickwick" he was paid 
£2500 outright. Chapman & Hall were, how- 
ever, liberal publishers, and at the expiration 
of five years they gave Dickens a third share 
of the copyright on the condition that he 
wrote another novel for them, and so "Nicho- 



las Nickleby" was produced. For each 
monthly part of "Nicholas Nickleby" Dick- 
ens received £150, making in all £3000. Af- 
ter five years the copyright reverted to the 

author. 

Buffalo's new union railroad station, to 
cost $6,000,000, is to have a waiting room 
80x286 feet, said to be the largest in the world. 
The other accessories and the train shed ar- 
rangements are to be on the same liberal 
scale. 

* 
* 
* 
* 




Photo 
graphic 
Supplies \ 



* 

„ Los Angeles, Cal. ^A^V^^XVCV^^. « 
*««**««***«**»*««* AAA************* 



Cel. IT1. I2<H 



W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. I he only 
manufacturer in S. California. Rtmember the 
number, 213 W. Fourth St. 



HALT! 

T " Military Boarding 
School 

in Southern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Made 
Military Training: Manly 

Parents will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful in deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sons. Mailed free.upon application. 

Los ftnaeles Military flcademu 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Emery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter It. Wheat Manager 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or 6rui here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, 111 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Thy Cre.me de Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 


Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
newspaper cuts— just anyhing you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 


Beers 

ADL0FF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
Lager Beers on draught at all principal saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited. Phone M 468 


Grillework 

JN0. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 


House Cleaning- 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, 81.50 day 
25c per hour. K>.i S. Broadway. Geo. Tanabi 


Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chafin & Fabricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re- 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 


Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

Arc made at Plaza Photo (jallery at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
pensesand can give you your money's worth. 
PI.A/.A GALLERY, 513 N. Main. 


Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker. Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115% N. Main St., Los Anoki.f.s 


Real Estate 

" Mayne finds tin* bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Keal Kstatc Agents 

118 West Fourth St. - - Los Anciei.es 


Carriage Works 

A. 1. LIKE 

Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc., made to order. 800-802 *. Spring 
and 801-803 8. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 


Printing- 

GEO. RICE & SONS, Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped In Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specialty. 

811-818 Nbw High St. • - Los Angeles 


Carpet Cleaning: 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

.Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. Oil South Broadway. I'hone M. 217 
Robt. Jordan 


Veterinary Surgxon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, (,'anine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinarv Hospital, 027 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1452, White 2131. 


Electrical Contractors 



W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Third St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours: 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

40>£ S. Sl'RlNO St, • • Los AN'iKLES 



Wood-Carpet 

JN0. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
, Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



Wines 

TRY OUR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

(iuaranteed purity and age. FREK. DELIVERY 
Southern California Wine Co. 220 West 
4th bt., Loe Angeles. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed Interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests In Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Leg-acles. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4^, 5c a roll 

Gilts 7^c " 

Ingrains 9c '' 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shades 25c each 

WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



Oldest and Largest Hank In Southern 
California 

Farmei's «S Merchants Bank 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) IftOO.OOO 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 



Total 11,426,742 



OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

II. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashlet 

li. HEIMANN Assistant Cashlci 



DIRECTORS 

W.H.Perry C. E. Thorn A.dlaasell 

0. W. Chllds I. W. Hcllman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

♦yflpeclal Collection Department. Our safety 
deposit department offers to the nubile, safes for 
rent in Its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100,000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUB ZZTZTZT. President 

1. N. VAN NUY8 V.ce-Presldent 

B. V. DUQUK Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kaaper Colin, II. 
W. O'Melvouy, J. B. I-ankcrshlm, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, L N. Van Nuys, W. rt. Kerckhoff, A. 
Haas. 

Park Market 

CHAM. KKSTNKIt, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone lied l»2r> 



14 



Western Graphic 



. v /Jmuscrncnts 

AFTER several weeks of dismal darkness 
the Los Angeles theatre began another 
season of activity with the refreshing comedy 
" A Bachelor's Honeymoon." The play is 
characteristic of author Stapleton in its rapid 
changes of situation, and the company is 
evenly balanced and legitimate in its work. 
There are some bright lines in the dialogue 
and some plays on words that are most dain- 
tily risque. Miss Delia Stacey carries the 
burden of beauty in the comedy and besides 
being a handsome woman has a piquant, 
hearty manner that wins her way. Alto- 
gether it is a pleasant entertainment and with 
Clay Clement next week will prepare Los 
Angeles theatre patrons for another season of 
Italian opera. 

IMPRESSARIO WYATT says he did, and 
Walter Morosco says he didn't, and they 
both emphasize their remarks by going into 
print about it. Well, nobody but the afore- 
said gentlemen care a balcony coupon whether 
the lords of the pass books succeed in im- 
peaching each other or not, just so they bring 
along some good shows and lock the doors 
during each act. No i'me would like to shy 
any cold water at Mr. Morosco's try at the 
managerial end of the Burbank, but everyone 
is anxious to see what luck he will have in 
the theatre lottery of Los Angeles. 



Several of the later favorites of the Bur- 
bank are making their marks in divers parts 
of the world. Miss Ada Palmer Walker of 
Wakefield Opera Company has become prima 
donna of the San Francisco Tivoli stock com- 
pany. Nance O'Neil is playing in London 
and the English critics are crediting her with 
an unusual talent. 

Those who are fortunate enough to hold 
membership tickets in the N.E.A. will have 
the opportunity to enjoy a novel entertain- 
ment next week in the Chinese theatre. The 
company which is to present the highest type 
of Chinese romantic drama is said to be the 
best organization of celestial Thespians ever 
brought to this country. There will be sixty 
performers in the cast besides a complete Chi- 
nese orchestra, and when the whole outfit gets 
in active motion the Midway Plaisance will 
be double discounted. 



There is a young woman in town who in- 
sists that when Mme. Houdini stepped into 
the cabinet for the trunk trick she wore a 
diamond sun burst, and that when they took 
her out of the sack after the mystifying trans- 
position of husband and wife the sunburst 
had not only changed to a bar pin, but that 
madame had increased her avoirdupois by at 
least five pounds. If it is a fact that Houdini 
was obliged to marry twin sisters to accom- 
plish his wonderful trick, how many Los 
Angeles young men could be induced to be- 
come prestidigitateurs under the same condi- 
tions? McAvoy and May still make things 
howl at the Orpheum, McAvoy thinking of 
something new and funny every perform- 
ance. This week's comedy is " The Duchess 
of Devonshire" by Francesca Redding and 
Carlton Macy. It is the old story of a frisky 
husband and an innocent, indiscreet wife. 
But Miss Redding is a stately woman with a 



pleasing personality and Mr. Macy acts the 
inebriated husband with experienced finish. 
Fred Xiblo is the new monologist. He indu- 
ces a ripple of laughter from start to finish 
and reminds one somewhat of Geo. Golden. 
The Phoites in pantomime are a small edition 
of " Fantasma," the spectacular that took 
theatre goers by the ears a few years since. 
They close the bill and are appreciated most 
by the children. 



Los Angeles Theater— Mr. Clay Clement in hie de- 
lightful comedy "The New Dominion" will be the 
attraction for the week commencing Monday night at 
the Lob Angeles Theater. Manager Wyatt offered 
special inducements to uecure this organization for 
the Teachers Convention week inasmuch as it is 
one of the most appropriate plays that could be pre- 
sented, being a wholesome type of American drama 
by an American author and a life-like picture of 
Southern life. 

Five years ago Mr. Clement presented "The New 
Dominion" in this city and made such a strong im- 
pression that his return is eagerly anticipated by all 
amusement lovers. Last season Mr. Clement pre- 
sented the play in San Francisco and scored a 
triumph. 

Mr. Clement will be supported by a coterie of arr 
tists who have won the unstinted praises of press 
and public for their portrayals of his characters 
AmoDg the members are Mrs. Clay Clement (Karra 
Kenwyn) Miss Phoea McAllister, Miss Nellie Mc- 
Ewen, Miss Gertrude 0*Malley and the Messrs. 
Harry Duffield, Geoffrey Williams, Chas. Mack and 
Thomas O'Malley. The engagement is for the entire 
week with Saturday matinee. 



Orpheum— Chas. Schimpf, secretary of the Or- 
pheum corporation, who has been in tne city during 
the week, says that the bill for next week at the Or- 
pheum is one of the most attractive ever put together 
by the men who arrange the acts of a vaudeville pro- 
gram. Schimpf should know— he has seen most of 
the features in the north and so speaks by the 
card. 

Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne head tho bill 
with a New Hampshire episode put into a thirty min- 
ute sketch called "Grasping an Opportunity." Cressy 
was the original Cy Prime in "The Old Homestead," 
and Miss Dayne was Ricketty Ann in the same great 
play. A treat is anticipated in their vaudeville com- 
edy for which they carry a special stage setting and 
scenery. 

Melville and Stetson, a high salaried duo of hand- 
some young women who do a singing, dancing and 
character imitating turn; the Four (J Learys, acrobats 
from Europe; the Great American Biograph, with ten 
new views from life; the Phoites Troupe of nine pan- 
tomimists; Francesca Redding in a new comedy, "A 
Forgotten Combination;" Tacianu, the famous female 
impersonator, and Fred Niblo, entertainer, are in- 
cluded in the bill. 



What They Say 

Len Behymer — The ballet girl is very 
handy with her foot. 

Bob Eckert — The flounder is a fish that 
requires plenty of seasoning and even then it 
is flat. 

Mose Hamburger — The most graceful girl 
in Los Angeles cannot try on a pair of shoes 
without putting her foot in it. 

Ed Tufts — No, a gun can't do great execu- 
tion when it hangs fire. 

Hancock Banning — The crying need in 
navigation is a marine Koch who can cure the 
ravages of coal consumption. 

Al Levy — A waiter may not know how to 
deal a pack of cards but he can easily raise 
the deuce by dropping a tray. 

Louis Vetter — I am told that billiards and 
matrimony resemble each other to this extent, 
that kisses and scratches are common to both. 

Guy Barham — Ice cream melts moie 
feminine hearts than hot words do. 

Abbot Kinney — You can pick out fools by 
the questions they ask and wise men by their 
answers. 



Harry Wyatt — Beauty isn't everything; 
the butterfly makes a great show, but it's the 
homely little bee that makes the honey. 

Tommie Rowan — But few men are sun- 
struck by the sunshine of prosperity. 

Nordlinger — The diamond is the hardest 
known substance — to get. 

Parson Jeffries — You have doubtless ob- 
served that small men seldom insult large 
ones. 

Jack Griffith — The goat is the butt of many 
a poor joke. 

John F. Francis — When you lose a friend 
by lending him a small sum of money you 
get the best of the bargain. 

Charlie Willard — People who are given to 
conceited fault finding imagine it is intelligent 
criticism. 

Sam Dewey — When a man gets too lazy to 
work he becomes a lofty idealist. 

Griffith J. Griffith — The cyclone can raise 
anything on the farm except the mortgage. 

Frank Miller — Two men trying to enter- 
tain one woman are a pretty good example of 
a silent majority. 

Hugh Vail — You never see a lucky fisher- 
man sneaking up a side street — except — at 
Santa Monica. 

Billy Rowland — The man who serves his 
friends never lacks employment. 

Charlie Monroe — The man who smiles if 
called an egotist will get mad if called a 
crank. 

Captain Overton — Any man who has had 
any dealings with an Indian is fully con- 
vinced that he is a red-"skin." 

T OS ANGELES THEATER 

J> . J a m. wood . > 

— \ H. 0. WYATT J Lessees 

EN(iA( ; EMENT F.XTRAORDIN A RY 



Entire Convention Week 
July lO-lU 



Mut in ccs Wedneeday 
and Saturday 



CL^IT CLEIrlEINlT aml a Seler,ert Com - 



S6 



imny of flayers.. 

IRF-SKNTINO HIS IDYLLIC CREATION 

Tm Mew BoniPM 



99 




Clean, Chaste and Refined; a most Interesting and Charming 

Drama. 

Feats now on sale 
25c, 5Cc, 75c, S1.00, and ?1.50 - - - Telephone .Main 70 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND 8E00ND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July 10. 

Win. M. Cressy i The Eastern Comedy stirs, presenting a 

and >■ New Hampshire Episode, entitled 

Blanche Dayne J "Grasping an opportunity." 

•Tuiiet Melville and I Far-Famed Character Vocalists and 

Kvie stetson ] Dialect Impersonators. 

The Four O' l.eary '», Europe's Comedy Eccentrics. 
American Kiojcraph, Startling, sensational, Original. 
9 Famous Phoites tt— Gorgeous Spectacular Entertainment. 
Francesca Redding, the Famous American Actress, sup- 
ported by 

Mr. Carlton Macy, in "The Duchess of Devonshire." 

Tacianu , the Clever Female Impersonator. 

Fred Niblo, Kelined Monologist and I'arody Vocalist. 



PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc. Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



U . f^V^I^^ . Cor. FIRST and 

Che palace spring sts. 

A Select Family Re ort 

Patronized by the business men of the city w ith 
their families". Elegantly fitted, cool in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance. Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Kestuuraiit and Refreshim n 1 - 
Last car of the evening in every direction aDd for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS 

55c, 65c to BOO fa, 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 
5oc. 800 to 75c vd. 
LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 

40c to 90C. '25c to 50c 

REFRIGERATORS $5, $7.50 to *20 

I. T. MARTIN, 531-535 So. Soring SI. 
Wheel Chairs sold or rented. 




Western Graphic 



In 



Continued from Page 11. 



evening remained at the hotel and on the 
island over Sunday, and the glorious Fourth 
also brought its full quota of visitors. 

Among those who were the 6rst patrons 
of the Gordon Arms and had the honor to 
inscribe their names on the register during 
the past week were: 

Mr and Mrs T E Gibbon, Mr and Mrs I A .levne, 
Mr and Mrs P Tucker. Mr and Mrs Bernard Rice, 
Mr and Mrs Geo O Fitch, Mr and Mrs H E Wood. 
Mr and Mrs C A Sumner, Mr and Mrs SV D Wool- 
wine, Mr and Mrs Sumner P Hunt, Mr and Mrs C D 
Willard, Mr and Mrs Waterman, Mr and MrsTnomas 
R Gordon of Pasadena, Mr and Mrs E P Bryan, Mr 
and Mrs H Jevne, Mr and Mrs J II Braly, Mr and 
Mrs James Swan of Pasadena, Mr and Mrs F. BSil- 
verwood, Mr and Mrs R S Crombie, Mr and Mrs 
James Hill, Mr and Mrs I N Richards, Mr and Mrs 
M L Osier Mr and Mrs G C Holloway; Mr T F Car- 
veil and daughter of Los Angeles, Mrs John W Dob- 
bins of San Gabriel, Miss Jones of San ( : abriel, Mrs 
H L Graham, Misa Jennie Graham, the Misses Jo- 
sephine Gordon and M E Gordon of Pasadena, 
Miss Lillie Wellborn, Miss Lillian Buckingham, Mrs 
A C Patterson, Miss Hazel Patterson, Miss Daisy 
Cross of San Francisco, Mrs L A Ellis of Pasadena, 
Mrs Hortense Fisher. Miss Pearl Fisher, Miss A 
Dewey, Miss Mabel Osier, Miss Matter of San Fran- 
cisco, Miss Henriet Milner; Messrs John B Bushnell, 
I X Carson, C R Holierhoff, J B Lankershim, Walter 
J Wren, W P Larkin, H P Randal of Pasadena, 
Walter C Fisher of Pasadena, D S Groesbeck of Pasa- 
dena, James P Eaton, L M Macy, Homer Laughlm 
Jr, Russ Avery, Burdette Jevne, J W Thayer, Geo H 
Robinsou of New York, A Newman of New York, 
H P Wendt, Harry Cunningham, Frank H. Jackson, 

CORONADO 

BISHOP MONTGOMERY of Los Angeles 
was noted among Coron ado's distin- 
guished visitors of the early part of the week. 
A large congregation listened to a most elo- 
quent address delivered by the Bishop at the 
Coronado Catholic Church Sunday last, the 
only regret being that the smallness of the 
chapel kept away numbers who were anxious 
to listen to the reverend gentleman's sermon. 

Miss Belle Smith, prominent in San Fran- 
cisco social circles, is the guest of Miss Cecelia 
O'Conno, of San Francisco, who is spending 
the summer on the beach. 

Mrs. Sands W. Forman and Miss Forman 
of San Francisco have returned to Hotel del 
Coronado for another season. 

Mr. and Mr. John Vance Cheney of Chi- 
cago were noted among visitors to the beach 
and at Hotel del Coronado during the past 
week. 

Mrs. Ehrmann and Miss Carrie G. Sachs 
of San Francisco, guests of the hotel, caught 
130 fish during two afternoon outings early 
in the week. 

It would be a difficult matter to say what 
was the leading pleasure giver of the season 
so far. Yachting is attracting many, with 
rowing parties as an honorable second. Fish- 
ing losses nothing as time advances, the pier 
being beloved of the angler. An athletic sea- 
son is assured by the presence of many men 
and many maids devoted to tennis and golf. 
Golf jackets dot the view in number. The 
links and club house know no such word as 
lonesomeness. 

LONG BEACH 

SAILING and fishing parties have been the 
fad the past week, the pleasure fleet hav- 
ing been kept on the go continually since the 
Fourth, that date usually marking the time 
when the great influx of summer visitors 
really sets in. Every year the crowds which 
Bummer here keep growing larger and larger, 
and notwithstanding the hundreds of new 
houses which have gone up since last winter, 
there will not be enough to go round. Last 
season 10,000 visitors passed the summer here, 
and that was the biggest season we ever had, 
but that it will be surpassed the present sea- 



son is evident from the immense number of 
people already here, there being now almost 
as many as at the most crowded part of last 
season. 

The new bathing establishment under the 
wharf is the most popular place on the beach, 
the arrangements for the comfort and accom- 
modation of patrons being most complete; all 
the appointments and appliances in use in 
fashionable modern seaside resorts are found 
here, the place being run up to date in every 
particular. 

Mrs. Henry C. Ludlam and daughter, of 
Monrovia, are at the beach, the guests of Dr. 
W. L. Cuthbert and family. 

Mrs. Frank Curtis of Indio and Miss 



On Monday afternoon next, July 11, a 
lawn fete will be given at the home of Mrs. 
Caroline M. Severance, 80G West Adams street. 
It will be for the benefit of the Los Ange- 
les Kindergarten Association, and is under 
the auspices of some of the most charming 
entertainers of the city. The handsome 
grounds that surround the Severance resi- 
dence have been offered for the use of the 
association on this occasion, and it is gener- 
ally acknowledged that a more delightful spot 
for an out-of-door entertainmentcould scarcely 
be found in Los Angeles. 




CHARLES W. OTT, AN INVARIABLE TIME WINNER, STARTING AND TIMING HIMSELF. 
Contrary to expectations, Mr. Ott did not start in the track races Tuesday, and the minor that he was dis- 
qualified is refuted by his statement that his best time for one mile is 2:10 2 5 and t hat he never made that 
distance in 2:07 3 .">, paced by \V. G. Furman, as has been stated. Mr. Ott says he will admit not being anxious 
to ride scratch with A. C. Mat!', but the real reason he did not enter was because he preferred to patronize 
t ncle Collis. 



Teresa, her daughter, are summer guests of 
Mrs. R. D. Curtis, their relative, on Pacific 
avenue. 

Miss Minnie Murray of Los Angele was 
the over-Sunday guest of Mrs. D. J. McCarthy 
at the Pine Hotel. 

Mrs. D. Blerkee and son, of Pasadena, are 
at the beach. 

Mrs. G. C. Horton and daughters, Marion 
and Helen, of Pasadena, are spending the 
summer here. 

Mrs. Strong and daughters, of Albuquerque, 
N.M., have taken the Montgomery cottage on 
second street and will stay a month. 

Mrs. G. C. Craw, who has been visiting 
relatives in Boston, returned on Wednesday. 



: | OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST., Los Angeles, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour from d.30 a m to 7.30 
p.m., K.30, 9.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LEAVE HANI) STAND, Manta Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three quarter from 5.45 a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.15, 9.45, 11'. 45. a 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

PHYSIC] &.NS \ m> -i ROl 0198 



There was a noticeable sprinkling of 
Eastern visitors at all the beaches on the 
Fourth, and Santa Monica was no exception. 
Teachers were conspicuous among this class, 
and in many cases each bore his or her kodak, 
which was snapped with alarming frequency 
in the neighborhood of the unsuspecting 
bathers, and will no doubt bear back to "the 
East" as souvenirs of "life as she is lived" 
in gay California. 

Tailoring: and Repairing 
Suits made to order, goode the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

H. L. Yerger, 118 West Second Street. 



St. Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



ELIZABETH A. FOLLANSBEE om, c """" \ ft » £™ 



315 SO. BROADWAY 
Rooms: 332-331 Laughlln Building 



Tel. Main 737 



JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 HOUTH MAIN, 
Hours: 9 a.m. to 12 m., 1 to fi p.m. 

H S. 0RME 

118-417 DOLOLAS BLDO 
Third and Spring Streets 



Tel. Main BH. 



i O Hire Main i>0 



Iel "- ) Res. Main 300 

MHDBOT 
245 N. BUNK Kit II ILL 



DKNTIS l 9 



D. CAVE 

LANKERSE1M BLOCK 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1515 



A Boarding and Day College for 
Young Men and Boys 

. ."THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
1 mercial and 1'reparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas aro awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Hanking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

the Tall term Beqins on monday, September 4th 

For further Information, send for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A. LINN, C. M. 




THE NEW CUP DEFENDER, COLUMBIA. 

The new cup defender, Columbia, which was launched at Herreshoff 'a, Bristol, 
R. I., on Saturday, June 10, has a length over all of 131 feet li inches, load water line 
89 feet 6 inches, beam 24 feet and draft 20 feet. Her sail area will be 13,900 feet, which 
is 15 per cent greater than that of the Defender, the American champion of 1895. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks Just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

w 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 





Many 01 

your Townswomen 



Are customers of ours and the satisfaction we 
have given in quality, style and the very low 
price causes them to continue their orders. 

We make Suits, Spring and Summer, Skirts, 
Bicycle Suits, Golf Suits — everything in Suits 
and Cloaks. 

Send bu Express prepaid 

Catalogue and Samples 

Free by mail for the asking 

The National 

ClOak COmpany 



119=121 West 23d Street 
New York City 



Gardening fa 
Calif orma «* * 




W. S. LYON 

FREE 

For a limited time we will give 
one of these books with each 
new or renewed annual sub- 
scription to Western 
Graphic 
$2. oo a year 

A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
^lo^ers in Southern 
California 

Written for tltis Soif and Climate 
J2icehj "Illustrated 
&venj (over of tfloWers should Have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 311 1™ ".'/^ 



Cowe 
Railway 



w 
f 



Magnifcent # 
Panorama of #> 
Earth and Ocean m 

# 

Grandest Trip $M 
on Earth # 



6cbo JMountain Rouse ft ft 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3. r i00 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without baths. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 
Special ft ft 

Guests remaining one weelt or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full information 
CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Traffic and Excursion Agent 

2 14 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Mala 960 



Tufts' Electric Works 



0<] SUC'CKSSOK TO P» 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



701 South Main Street 



Electrical Repairing 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=Class Machine Work 

JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



lUUli 



Press of Geo. Uice & Sons (Inc.) 311 316= New High 8treet 




Los Angeles, Saturday, July 15, 1899. 




Western Graphic 



, A. A* A. 



McCall's J ly Patterns and Magazine Now In 




Hen's and Boys' Bathing Suits 

IF you go to the beach and get one of those 
bathing suits that has been used by every 
Tom, Dick and Harry, you will wish you had 
paid the little money we charge and owned a suit 
of your own. We do not know how long our present 
stock will hold out, but there are enough to last for 
this week at anv rate. 



Bojs' One -Piece Wool Bathing 
Suits, fine jersey ribbed, 
black, trimmed with 
white stripes 

Same quality in Two- Piece 



$1.25 



satSI 50 

$1 



Men's Bathing Suits of fine qual- 
ity black jersey ribbed with 
white trimmings, two piece com- 
bination or swimming 
suit style, extra value at 



MM 



Bathing Suits for little toddlers, 
two to four years, all 
pure worsted 



Men's Bathing Suits, all pure 
worsted, black, jersey ribbed, 
knee-lengih trunks, a nn 
very exceptional value *P0.UU 



California Blankets— just the thing for campers and seaside cottagers, 
$2.95 a pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 

317-325 South Broadway Between Third and Fourth 



m 
$ 

/IS 



S pend the Summer 

T San Diego a nd 
Coronado Beach 

It costs no more than at other resorts 

POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 

June 16 and 17 August 4 and 5 

July I and 2 September I and 2 

Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

Inquire of Santa Fe Route 'gent 200 South -prlDg Street (eor. 2nd) Los Aigelci 



9 IIIUI^ 

4 



I 

f 
I 

I 

$ 
\»/ 

$ 



L* A* Sulphur Springs ^rBaths 

$ •— t or. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. % 

f6 These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of % 
<fc Kidney ann Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. !» 

A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor 



MRS. L. LAKIEUX, Manageress § 



j avww v ww.wvyv-vv v-> v*yvw->^vy vSwaasvvvViivvr v- -v^ 

_ t\ 

*-A" . %t. nJ/ 4. 



'*L~ -Jy »J>» 




Joseph Mini; 
Pres ai.d Trcas. 



GSOBGl ZOBEI.EIN 

Vice-Pres. and Sic'y 



HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier& Zobelein 

Brewery 



444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91. T 




PROFESSOR HITE'S NEW AIRSHIP. 

Professor Charles E. Hitc of Philadelphia, is the latest, li s airship is a halloo- 
irj the shape of an egg. inflated with hydro-c.iibini pw and driven through the air V 
means nf f. ins operated by an engine as a s'lip is drivi u h: u g i t lie water hi nr: " ''° 
Professor Hite's aiiship was bail* at Trenton. N. J. 



A 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

8.oo a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



: ROUND TRIP 

50c 



«jt jt Good Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9.35 p.m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 

311-313 New High Street, 

Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 

Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 



Single 



ft 



ROSE PURITY WATER 



. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER fr. m Highland Glen, California. The 
analysis of ROSK PURITY WATER shows it t > contain the most healthful properties known for 
Constipatioo, Indigestion and Kidney difficulties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use. It is nicely furnished In one and five-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all points of the 
city aud towns through our agents. You nre ii vlted to visit us. s< e our beautiful .oration and 
established improvements for delivery of ROSE PURITY WATER to nil our customers. Try it and 
find as stated. Where it has Its way it flows night aDd day. It is cool and cl ar as crystal as it 
runs from the Spring Rock Fountain head. It Is not a dead watei; its virtue for h alth is Spirit, 
Life and Purity. For orders address 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. LA 1MB & WHITNEY, 

Tel. Sub Station lO PASADENA AND 40th AVENUES 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 3 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 15, 1899. 



Edition de LvXt 
lo Cents ■ Copy 



Western Graphic 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 



MR. BUCKLE tried to teach us that 
every form of civilizition was the 
natural product of the climate, soil, food, and 
the general aspects of nature. That a scien- 
tific expert could tell as soon as he read a book 
or glanced at a picture whether the author 
lived under a tropical or wintry sky. This 
theory may seem plausible but is open to a 
good deal of suspicion; for instance, Mr. 
Bagehot says "that emigrants might live a 
thousand years in Australia or Tasmania and 
never become like the natives of those lands;" 
that in short race has something to do with 
the shape and quality of civilization; that 
blood will tell. Be this as it may, we feel 
sure there are more potent and subtle forces 
at work in molding individual habits and 
conduct than any that comes from geography, 
climate or natural scenery. 

Some one asked the manager of the Lon- 
don Times how it happened that one man was 
able to write all the articles that appeared in 
that paper, as they all appeared so much 
alike in trick of thought and style. "Oh," 
he replied, "there is always some one the best 
contributor, and all the rest copy him." We 
have here in this curt reply the philosophy of 
nearly all the great changes in art, literature, 
drama, the pulpit, and the rage for any special 
fashion and novelty which may hold sway for 
a season and then turn away to make room 
for another. Many of us can remember when 
nearly every young man in college had some- 
thing Carlylish in his style and thought, and 
when the sophomores aped the habit of Lord 
Byron, wore big shirt collars turned down, 
without neckties, and affected a wild stare, 
that seemed to say to their doting mothers, 
you had better hide the knives and razors or 
your young hopeful may do some mischief. 

The author of "Eothen" gives a pleasant 
description of the way that every English- 
man, no matter how wise and shrewd he may 
be, after being a while in Oriental lands, falls 
into the belief of witchcraft, and avers there 
must be something in it. He may admit that 
he has seen nothing strange himself, but then 
he has seen so many who have that he gradu- 
ally begins to believe that they cannot all be 
mistaken. He lived in an infectious atmo- 
sphere and quite unconsciously caught the 
prevailing superstition. 

None of us are aware how much the imita- 
tive instinct has had to do in silently shaping 
our thoughts and coloring our conduct. Who 
can tell just when and how he came into 
possession of his present religious or political 
opinions? They are in the air, and we catch 
them as the children do the measles, and like 
the measles we never catch the same set of 
ideas twice. We have here an explanation of 



the fact why crime and suicide are often epi- 
demical. When the trial of a criminal ia 
made a sort of public drama, his words, atti 
tude, and even pictures become a salable com 
modity in the market, it is not strange that 
worthless scoundrels, streaked with an inor- 
dinate egotism, may often be smitten with an 
almost irrepressible desire to enjoy being the 
object of such a sensation. 



"Why does not the City Council adopt the 
suggestion of the Graphic," said a business 
man a few days since, "and meet the City 
Water Company folks?" The same remark 
has been make a great many times. The 
present owners of the stock of the Water 
Company are all citizens of this city, are 
easily approached, are public spirited, and 
have done much towards the advancement of 
our city. They spend their dividends and in- 
vest all their surplus right here and should 
be personally consulted and the business of 
the Water Company's interest talked over in 
a business way. 

Is it not a mistake for this city to under- 
take to force some of her own citizens to give 
up a property by applying the law, which so 
far has all been on the side of the Water 
Company, instead of mutually agreeing upon 
an amicable settlement? The city has taken 
steps towards voting $2,000,000 bonds, which 
they expect to sell to foreign capitalists, and 
after receiving the money to tender a little 
over half of it to the company for their inter- 
ests, the balance to be juggled with in repairs, 
etc. It has been shown by financial and legal 
men that it is more than possible — almost 
certain — that even were the bonds voted and 
sold and the money realized, that it would be 
years before the Water Company could be 
compelled to accept it for their interests, if at 
all. The result of bonds would be an addi- 
tional tax of about $100,000 a year for eight 
or ten years while the courts were deciding a 
matter that Western Graphic believes could 
be arrived at by a joint, meeting of a com- 
mittee from the Council and one from the 
Water Company. 



When Lord Macaulay pictured the Tas- 
manian of the future as standing on London 
bridge and viewing the ruins rf a faded civil- 
ization doubtless he was not more than half 
in earnest. Certainly the majority of his 
readers have accepted his forecast as merely a 
jest. Yet according to certain scientific pre- 
dictions that have been made recently there is 
more than a probability that the grim jest 
will some day become a sober reality, says 
the Philadelphia Inquirer. The basis of the 
prediction is the fact that the world's supply 
of coal is being rapidly exhausted, it being 
declared on high engin'ering authority that 
"with the exhaustion of its coal not <<nly will 
the power and influence of a nation decline 
but even its existence will be imperiled." 

Coal, it is urged, is the foundation stone, 
so to speak, of modern civilization. Eliminate 
coal from the world today and what would be- 
come of our civilization tomorrow. Nearly 
all our factories would cease to work; our 
ships would lie helpless on the seas; our rail- 
way systems would become mere avenueB for 



the creeping traffic of horse carB — in a word 
chaos would supervene in our present social 
structure. Hut what of electricity, what of 
compressed air, what of gas as fuel you say. 
All these, as at present utilized, are but prod- 
ucts of the consumption of coal, and as the 
case stands today it needs no practical reser- 
vation that the work of mankind is done by 
the energy which is stored in coal and which 
is liberated and made available when coal is 
burned. 



Among the other distinguished persons 
who took a kindly hand in welcoming the 
teachers from all over the country now in Los 
Angeles was Governor Gage who has been in 
the city and at his ranch and at Coronado 
for two weeks . The Governor made the in- 
structors a very pretty little speech which 
was as finished as it was short and appro- 
priate. He gave our guests a right royal hand 
of good fellowship and made a fine impres- 
sion on all present. The Governor is looking 
as well and as natural as usual and is in ex- 
tremely high glee over his superb success in 
extricating the I'niversity of California from 
a tax that would have cast an odium over the 
whole state. 



Some six or seven years ago a cynical 
Englishman, who had forgotten Trafalgar 
square, wrote a book entitled '"If Christ 
Came to Chicago" — and then he dilated 
severely upon the vic^s of the city that gave 
embalmed b:ef to the brave soldiers of the 
nation. Now, when we saw old man Brink — 
whose oysters on the halfshell are superior to 
many of his athletic fakes — on a balcony seat 
alongside of Jeffries, the prize fighter, be 
hind four cream white horses in the midst of 
nearly six thousand people, we were reminded 
of the Chicago hook and the fact that not long 
since Moody, tht greatest evangelical preacher 
since St. Paul, rode up from the depot on a 
street car and that later General Booth, the 
head of the Salvation Army, came to his 
lodgings with an escort of a single hundred 
of his legion. Truly, if Christ came to Los 
Angeles he wouldn't be in it with the low 
down pugs that ar<i hauled by creim white 
horses and escorted to palatial hotel suites by 
bands of music and thousands of admirers 
amidst the acclamations of multitudes. Poor 
Nazarenel Glory be to Jeffries! 



Statistics have been taken in France of 
the spread of the habit of smoking and it has 
been discovered that within the 1 ist year the 
cigarette and even, astonishing as it may ap- 
pear, the pipe have found an enormous in- 
crease in their female votaries. The fashion 
of smoking among wom-n is no longer con- 
fined to the secrecy of a private room. The 
Duche-s de Uzes and the Marchioness de la 
Rochefoucauld now publicly take a cigarette 
after dinner and whatever these ladies permit 
themselves may safely be taken as a sign of 
the highest bon ton. The statistics alluded to 
show that 807,000,000 cigarettes are yearly 
consumed in France. Th'se who are fund of 
sums may rejoice to learn that the cigarettes 
consumed during the year in Franc, if pi need 
end to end, would go around the glot e 514 
times. 



4 



Western Graphic 




Greater Los Hngeles 

City and County 




WE ONCE heard the late lamented J. 
de Barth Shorb say that the time 
would come when Southern California would 
ship five thousand carloads of oranges. Not 
five hundred carloads were being shipped at 
that time, and all present simply laughed or 
expressed themselves in syllables not compli- 
mentary to Mr. Shorb's judgment. He once 
said to the editor of this paper: "I may not 
live to see the day, but the time is not far 
distant when Southern California will send 
away, principally to the East, eight thousand 
carloads of oranges annually. The orange 
business cannot be overdone, for three rea- 
sons: In the first place, all children are 
fonder of oranges than any olher fruit; and 
it is my observation that whatever children 
like well grown people take to readily. In 
the next place there is only a small area of 
land in our country where oranges can be 
grown successfully, while the demand, like 
our population, will rapidly increase. Besides, 
there are many uses that the orange may be 
put to besides placing them on the table as 
they are taken from the tree." No man ever 
prophesied more truly. In the first place, 
quite twelve thousand carloads have been 
shipped out of Southern California in a single 
season, and the demand, like the population 
of our country, is on the increase. And not 
only nearly twelve thousand carloads have 
been shipped from Southern California the 
present season— which is four thousand more 
carloads than the brilliant Shorb ever dreamed 
0 f — but at prices higher than ever obtained 
before. 

By the way, as an article of fruit-food 
oranges stand at the head of the list, and have 
never been known to hurt children or grown 
up people when perfectly ripe and uninjured. 
The value of oranges as an article of food is 
becoming better known. "I buy them by the 
box," says a mother, "and let my children 
eat them constantly in lieu of candy and 
other prized children's dainties. I consider 
that I save money by it." At some of the in- 
ebriate asylums oranges have proved an effi- 
cient substitute for alcohol, patients sucking 
the juice of them abundantly every time the 
thirst for liq'or comes upon them. This fact 
is so well recognized that often at temperance 
coffee stands piles of luscious oranges are also 
kept. 

And now another benefit is alleged for 
them, says the New York Times. Some fa- 
mous French beauties of former days, it is as- 
serted, secured and preserved their marvelous 
complexions by a free diet of oranges. One in 
particular lived almost entirely on the fruit. 
A dozen each at breakfast and luncheon made 
up these repasts; at dinner a dozen more, with 
a crust of bread and one glass of Burgundy. 
Doubtless an orange fad is threatening — for 
the pursuit of a complexion is a very absorb- 
ing one to women. 



It is hardly three years since Professor 
Lowe undertook to go further up into the 
Sierra Madre heights with his wonderful 
aerial railway, and since its completion to its 



present terminus and the building of th 
Alpine Tavern tens of thousands of enrap- 
tured tourists have traveled over it, and today 
it is one of the best advertisements Los Ange- 
les has, because multitudes come to this sec- 
tion on purpose to "go up over ihe Mount 
Lowe Railway." This marvelous railway in 
the skies now reaches more than half way to 
the loftiest summit, and the writer was one of 
a party who took a ride over the new piece of 
work just before it reached the Tavern, and 
he remembers it as delicious beyond descrip- 
tion. It is about four miles from Echo Moun- 
tain to Mount Lowe Springs, and, with the 
exception of a piece of trestle-work here and 
there, the wonderful thoroughfare takes its 
way over a bed of solid granite as everlasting 
as the heavens. There were twenty-two ladies 
and gentlemen along, and the Professor was 
in a high state of enthusiasm and felicity. 
The night was balmy and odorous; the moon 
was lustrous and full; th* woods weremuiscal 
with soft sounds; and ever and anon the 
powerful rays from the searchlight illuminated 
the summits of the highest mountains and 
the depths of the lowest canyons, and the en- 
tire party was entranced by one of the most 
public spirited, noble, picturesque, stupendous 
and audacious enterprises ever undertaken by 
man. 

We were up betimes on Sunday as we had 
been bidden to repeat the trip while the great 
orb of all was flinging his unsubdued splen- 
dors over the land, and when every outline of 
dome and chasm and leaf and tree and rock 
and ledge stood out distinctly and so that 
every curve and grade and trestle and viaduct 
might be impressively portrayed on the mind. 
In addition to the party of the night before 
there were other ladies and gentlemen, all of 
whom were profuse in their expressions of ad- 
miration over this electric aerial marvel of the 
Coast range. 

No visiting teacher should omit this en- 
chanting side trip from his itinerary, for what 
the Rigi railway is to Switzerland, the Mount 
Washington system to New England, the 
Vesusivus cog road to Italy, so is the Mount 
Lowe Railway to Southern California, and 
surpassing all others many times, except, 
perhaps, the Rigi. 

A Few Bright Thoughts 

The sunsets of the Pacific are beautiful 
beyond compare. Down in the city's heart 
we, looking upward, catch a glimpse now and 
then of glories that seem almost too bright to 
last — here a purple cloud with silver lining, 
there a crimson banner of ethereal drapery, 
or a canopy of azure trimmed with a golden 
fleece; but the celestial phenomena are best 
observed from the summits of the hills, from 
which at times the heavens appear as if roofed 
with beams of gold and silver inlaid with 
precious gems. For the lover of aerial scenery 
there is always something to be studied in our 
Western skies. Clouds, says a recent writer, 
form one of the most beautiful studies in 
nature. More gorgeous than the flowers, 
grander than the forests, mightier than the 
rivers, gentler than the zephyrs, they change 



from gloom to glory, from leaden unto gold, 
as silently as the passing away of a soul. 
No eider down was ever so light; no fleece was 
ever so fair; granite and grim today, Tyrian 
and mother-of pearl tomorrow. In the morn- 
ing, a breath that a seraph in full song might 
have breathed; at night, a bank the world's 
red roses might have grown on. Pleasure 
clouds, rain clouds, clouds of an hundred 
guns. This one might have been issued from 
the chimney of the old homectead at a winter 
sunrise; that is as grand as the pillar of flame 
that went before the host in the Wilderness. 
Mountains covered with snow, crags dipping 
chrysolites, plains sowed with gold, vales full 
of night; breath of a sparrow, song of the 
stars; waves of the sea, walls of alabaster, 
marble of Carrara; pennons of princes, ban- 
ners for armies, mantles for tempests and 
robes for the dead. Moulded by the fingers of 
the wind, they blossom in the sunshine, petals 
of the flower-cup of heaven. 

We build our castles of the granite of 
cloud, and we stand on the ledges that grow 
under the sandals of day, as it steps from 
cliff unto cliff into heaven. Palettes whereon 
Evening paints the gone morning "from mem- 
ory;" the visible song of the Day that is dead, 
ships of the sea of heaven; quarries out of 
which we hew paradise, are they all. When 
we think that the morning cloud is like life 
we are sad; but when we see it waiting 
in royal array in God's western gate, we are 
glad again, for we think how beautiful may 
we be a dying. 

Anent the peace conference, the most sig- 
nificant utterance yet made is that of ex- 
Premier Crispi, who in a late article published 
over his own name says that the safety of 
Europe "lies not in disarmament, but in the 
substitution of united states for divided 
states." He would have it the "United States 
of Europe." 

Two teachers met, laughing, at Broadway and 
Third, 

And one asked the other, in tones like a bird: 
' Say, where are you staying, do tell me, 
please?" 

"Why, dearest, I'm staying at the Hotel Van 

Neese." 

Along came another, with shirtwaist so gay, 
And said: "I am perfectly at home where I 
stay. 

I'm rooming with a Boston girl just straight 
from Suez, 

And we're having a good time at Hotel Van 
Nuez." 

And there still came another, with pompadour 
puff, 

And spake of her lodgings and of other good 
stuff. 

Says she: "Those bookeis were uncommonly 
wise 

To pack so many of us in the Hotel Van 
Nyse." 

And just at that time the "bookie" came 
'long, 

Humming "After the Ball," or some such 
song. 

And he said to himself, : 'Ah! I knew my 
biz 

When I packed all those butes in the Hotel 

Van NizT 

There was a young man from Pomona, 
Who vowed he'd eat yards of Bolona; 
The coroner now has the body in charge — 
For dead is the man from Pomona. 



Western Graphic 



6 



AN OLD FAVORITE, APPROPOS OF JULY 14. 
The Fall of the Bastile 

"What drummer on earth could be prouder 
Than I, while I drumm'd at Versailles 

To the lovely court ladies in powder, 
And lappets, and long satin tails? 

"The princes that day pass'd before us. 

Our countrymen's glory and hope; 
Monsieur, who was learned in Horace, 

D'Artois, who could dance the tight rope. 
One night we kept guard for the Queen 

At Her Majesty's opera box, 
While the King, that majestical monarch. 

Sat filing at home at his locks. 

"Yes, I drumm'd for thefai- Antoinette; 

And so smiling she look'd, and so tender, 
That our officers, privates and drummers 

All vow'd they would die to defend her. 
But she cared not for us honest fellows, 

Who fought and who bled in her wars; 
She sneer'd at our gallant Rochambeau, 

And turned Lafayette out of doors. 

"Ventrebleu! then I swore a great oath 

No more to such tyrants to kneel; 
And so. just to keep up my drumming, 

One day I drumm'd down the Bastile! 
Ho, landlord! a stoup of fresh wine; 

Come, comrades, a bumper we'll try, 
And drink to the year eighty-nine, 

And the glorious Fourth of July! 

"Then bravely our cannon it thundered, 

As onward our patriots bore; 
Our enemies were but a hundred, 

And we twenty thousand or more. 
They carried the news to King Louis, 

He heard it as calm as you please; 
And, like a majestical monarch, 

Kept filing his locks and his keys. 

"We show'd our republican courage. 

We storm'd and we broke the gate in, 
And we murder'd the insolent governor 

For daring to keep us a-waiting. 
Lambesc and his 6quadrone stood by; 

They never stirr'd finger or thumb; 
The saucy aristocrats trembled 

As they heard the republican drum. 

"Hurrah! what a storm was a-brewing! 

The day of our vengeance was come; 
Through scenes of what carnage and ruin 

Did I beat on the patriot drum! 
Let's drink to the famed tenth of August; 

At midnight I beat the tattoo, 
And woke up the pikeman of Paris, 

To follow the bold Barbaroux. 

"With pikes, and with shouts, and with torches, 

March'd onward our dusty battalions; 
And we girt the tall castle of Louis, 

A million of tatterdemalions! 
We storm'd the the fair gardens where tower'd 

The walls of his heritage splendid; 
Ah, shame on him, craven and coward, 

That had not the heart to defend it! 

"With the crown of his sires on his head, 
His nobles and knights by his side, 

At the foot of his ancestors' palace 
'Twere easy, methinks, to have died. 

But no; when wo burst through his barriers, 
'Mid heaps of the dying and dead, 

In vain through the chambers we sought him,— 

He had turned like a craven and fled. 
• •*#** 

"You all know the Place de la.Concorde? 

'Tis hard by the Tuilerie wall; 
'Mid terraces, fountains, and statues, 

There rises an obelisk tall. 
There rises an obelisk tall, 

All garnish'd and gilded the base is; 
'Tis surely the gayest of all 

Our beautiful city's giy places. 

"Around it are gardens and flowers, 

And the cities of France on their thrones. 
Each crown'd with his circlet of flowers, 

Sits watching this biggest of stones! 
I love to go sit in the sun there, 

The flowers and fountains to see, 
And to think of the deeds that were done there, 

In the glorious year ninety-three. 



" 'T was here stood the Altar of Freedom, 

And though neither marble nor gilding 
Was used in those days to adorn 

Our simple republican building, 
Corbleu! but the Mkiie Gcili.otine 

Cared little for splendor or show. 
So you gave her an axe and a beam. 

And a plank and a basket or so. 

"Awful, and proud, and erect. 

Here sat our republican goddess; 
Each morning her table we deck'd 

With dainty aristocrats' bodies. 
The people each day flock'd around, 

As she sat at her meat and her wine: 
'Twas aiways the use of our nation 

To witness the sovereign dine. 

"Young virgins with fair golden tresses, 

Old silver-hair'd prelates and priests, 
Dukes, marquises, barons, princesses, 

Were splendidly served at her feasts. 
Ventrebleu! but we pamper'd our ogress 

With the best that our nation could bring. 
And dainty she grew in her progress, 

And call'd for the head of a king! 

"She call'd for the blood of our king, 

And straight from his prison wo drew him; 
And to her with shouting we led him, 

And took him, and bound him, and slew him. 
•The monarchs of Europe against me 

Have plotted a godless alliance; 
I'll fling them the head of King Louis,' 

She said, 'as my gage of defiance.' 



*, A n 



Good Luck and Bad 

Tmk belief that Friday is a day of bad 
luck arose from varied reasons One super- 
stition is that it was on Friday Adam and 
Eve ate the fatal apple, and then it is agreed 
that Christ was crucified on Friday. It is 
believed to be bad luck to cut the linger nails 
on Friday, and manicurists say their business 
is lightest on that day. 

One cannot be too careful regarding the 
wedding day. There is an old saw which 
everyone knows: "Monday for health, Tues- 
day for wealth, Wednesday the best day of 
all; Thursday for crosses, Friday for losses, 
Saturday no luck at all!" May is supposed 
to be an unlucky month to get married in and 
June the luckiest of the twelve. 

Scores of things children do in play are 
relics of savage superstition. Pulling a dande- 
lion flower is one of these and the crossing of 
the fingers in the game of tag to 6ecure im- 
munity comes from the use of the Christian 
symbol to ward off evil spirits. 

The breaking of a looking glass to most 
people is an evil omen, and they cannot be 





jP6g Pip - 




Copyrighted is;i», Earle 0. Anthony. 



IN THE CiKANIl CANON OF THE COLORADO 
"Whore all is wild mid soul inspirlin; In its urandeui." 



"I see him as now, for a moment, 

Away from his jailers he broke, 
And stood at the foot of the scaffold, 

And linger'd, and fain would have spoke. 
'Ho, drummer! quick! silence yon Capet,' 

Says Santerro. 'with a beat of your drum;' 
Lustily then did I tap it, 

And the son of Saint Louis was dumb." 

— WlTiIilAM Makkpeack Th ack Kit v v. 

Hknky Wattkrsoh has drafted a new pol- 
icy for the democracy which treats the ques- 
tion of mone}- and expansion as settled and 
provides for legislation against trusts, for 
tariff for revenue only, for the recovery to the 
people of all public franchises and for "such 
reorganizalion of the judical systems as will 
remove them farther from the influences of 
the rich and make them more accessible to the 
poor." It will be observed that Mr. Watter- 
son continues to reserve the right to do his 
own thinking. 



persuaded out of the belief that some member 
of the family will die before the year is up. 
It is said the cracking of a mirror hanging 
beside a picture of Josephine led Napoleon to 
regard her as a doomed woman, and that he 
then began to consider a second wife. 

THROUGH the army and navy department 
of the Young Men's Christian Association 
some one who desires to remain unknown has 
just subscribed $50,000 to be used in provid- 
ing shore homes for sailors and marines in the 
United States service in Brooklyn, Boston, 
Norfolk, Key West, (ialveston and San Fran- 
cisco. The only condition imposed with the 
gift is that $100,000 be added to it by other 
friends of Uncle Sam's sea-fighters. Rear 
Admiral Philip, Captain Merrill Miller, Cap- 
tain McCalla, Commander Stockton and other 
naval officers have the matter in charge. 



Western Graphic 




To the Profession — A special feature of the We tern' 




■ire solicited una will lie Mioiisheo iree. rtii communications 
should l>e sent in by Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Kditor of Western 
Gkaphic, Los Angeles. 

THE musical horizon is not very thickly 
dotted with approaching events, but, 
contrarily, the retreat of many of the musi- 
cians to the coast and mountains cau3es a 
feeling of lonesomeness among the ultra- 
musical set. Then everything must give way 
this week to the N.E A., and no doubt many 
revelled in the harmony of the overture at 
the Chinese theater. 

Next Tuesday evening the Woman's Or- 
chestry will give a program at Blanchard 
Hall, and from the excellence of work at the 
rehearsals the concert will prove a treat. The 
ladies have worked hard to make a success of 
this event and a recognition of their efforts is 
meet. 

The "new echool" of music will be more 
than interested in the following note on 
Siegfried Wagner's "Der Baerenhaueter" 
by Signor Lucchesi in the Wasp, who lately 
received the score of the new opera: The lucky 
son of his illustrious father seems to have 
succeeded in dressing the comic and light sub- 
ject with music very suitable to the situa- 
tions. The paternal influence is plainly seen. 
It is a continued research for new effects very 
often falling into exaggeration, and breaking 
that wonderful balance which is one of the 
greatest values in Richard Wagner's music- 
dramas. The "Waltz of the Devil," although 
beautiful, shows such fault. The best 
number seems to be the introduction to the 
third act, which is worked out with undeni- 
able mastery and grandeur. Of course, my 
impressions, derived only from reading the 
vocal score, are subject to modification. The 
chances of our hearing such an opera being 
rather slim, it is to be hoped that the officers of 
the San Francisco Symphony Society will en- 
deavor to secure for the coming season at 
least some orchestral excerpts from the "Baer- 
enhaueter," and be sure that Fritz Scheel, our 
only possible symphony leader, will give it 
that happy interpretation which has helped 
so much to render popular among us the most 
noted orchestral morceaux of Papa Wagner. 

On Friday evening the old soldiers at Sol- 
diers' Home and quite a number of outsiders 
enjoyed a musicale given in the Ward Memo- 
rial Hall on the grounds by Miss Susette L. 
Sullivan, soprano, assisted by Mrs. F. Rigdon 
Williams, pianist; Miss Angela Louise Ander- 
son, reader and impersonator; Mrs. N. C. 
Clark, M.D., soprano; Mrs. W. D. Larrabee, 
accompanist. Such entertainments are greatly 
enjoyed by the old veterans and as the admis- 
sion is but ten cents, barely sufficient to cover 
expenses, a great many of them are enabled 
to receive their share of the sunshine of life. 

Blanchard Hall waB an ideal place for 
the sessions of the music department of the 
N.E. A., which began Wednesday afternoon. 
The hall was crowded at every meeting and 
many interesting papers were .read and dis- 
cussions indulged in on musical topics, of 



course principally as applied to school work. 

During the Wednesday afternoon session 
of the N.E. A. at Hazard's Pavilion Miss 
Myrtle Canady brightened the program with 
a violin solo, and was complimented by an 
enthusiastic encore. 

Mrs. J. G. Scarborough gave one of her 
delightful "at homes" Wednesday after- 
noon at her home on C instance street in 
honor of Mrs. Genevra Johnstone Bishop. It 
was a musical afternoon and a fine program 
included numbers by Mrs. Johnstone-Bishop, 
Mrs. Albert Carlos Jones, Mrs. Orr Harralson, 
Mrs. C. Modini-Wood, Miss Mary O'Don- 
oughue, H. Russell Ballard, Harry S. Wil- 
liams and Mrs. Scarborough. Mrs. Jones and 
Mrs. Harrals on assisted in recei ving. 

Effect of Music 

Just as music has different effects on dif- 
ferent natures, so it acts differently upon 
animals of varying species. Weird music 
is more successful in attracting the atten- 
tion of animals than that of the louder and 
harsher instruments. The blare of a trumpet 
only infuriates them, while of the coronet and 
flagolet they take not the least notice. Bag- 
pipes and the violin are afforded attention 
and interest. 

When a whistle was played for the benefit 
of a cage of monkeys it was found the green- 
bonnet monkey sat with hands and feet tightly 
drawn together, as though he controlled him- 
self by the utmost effort. Another monkey 
dropped his jaw and made horrible faces at 
the musician. 

Eagles when played to become serious and 
sedate and listen patiently with evident enjoy- 
ment. 

Lionesses are affected most by the bag- 
pipes. They crouch half frightened and then 
dash madly around their cage as though 
scared. Captive coyotes when music is played 
will range themselves in a half circle and 
listen with the greatest attention. 

Snakes like the bagpipes played softly, 
and will sometimes coil up with raised head 
and gently sway to and fro. Perhaps the most 
surprising effect is that of music on the alli- 
gator. When the experiment was tried the 
big brute rose from the water and actually 
smiled with his great teeth exposed. 



Yale college has at last elected a presi- 
dent, the successful man being Prof. A. T. 
Hadley, a member of the faculty and a leader 
in Eastern educational thought. The presi- 
dential vacancy has existed for some months, 
during which time nearly every prominent 
scholar in the country has been "mentioned" 
for the place. 

Iowa is out of debt and it is expected that 
the state will have a big surplus on hand by 
the first of the year. In addition to having 
no debt, Iowa must have a shortage of pro- 
fessional politicians. 

NEW MUSIC AT BLANCHARD'S 

Piano: "An Album Leaf,"' Catnillo Eogel; "Con- 
certo," C sharp minor, Scharwenka. Voice; "Daf- 
fodils," Abbey A. Ford; "A Bye-low Song," W. J. 
McCoy. 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MMh. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTONE-BISHOP 

CONChKT and ORATORIO SOLOIST 
VOCAL 1NSTKUI HON 
Pupil: Madame Anna de l.a Orange, Parl>>; Siguor Bandagger, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio — Blanchard Mrsic and art Building 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modini-Wood 
007 Kigueroa street. 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
TIIEOKV 

230 Bellman Block 

THOMAS W . WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY 

Ori.anist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Residence and Stcdio 621 West 17th 



MRS. F.RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
and SOLO PI4NISTE 

Rt Feres oes! 

Blimchard Piano Co., I,. A. 614 PoiTH Main Street, 
Edward Sebirner, Berlin 

Moritz Moszkowski, Paris . Los Angeles, Cal. 




J.BONDFRANCISCO 

< ONCERT VIOLINIST 
and TEACHER 

Pupil of 

Emanlei. Wirth, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 

Studio — 

BL VN'CIIARD BUILDING 

MRS. W. B. CLAPP 

TEACH KR OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Corcert, CI oir and Oratorio Pinging a 
spcci Ity 

Crorii-ter of the Fits! MethodiM Ej is- 
cojal Tal en arle, of PaMidcn*, Cal. 

PA HA LENA, CAI.. 



FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

STUDIO, SO0 Blanchard Building 

MRS. S. f OOK, Solo Pianist 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons 



MISS MYRTLE CANADY 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and concetrs accepted. 

At Studio SUITE 316 BLANCHARD BUILDING Wednesdav, 
Residence— •Thursday, Saturday, foiencons. 

California Hotel, cor 2d and Mill. Phone M 1184 

MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHER OF PIANO-FORTE MUSIC 

Pupil ofJ H. IIahn, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory of 
Music; and of H. C. Post, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Stidio, 433 W. Ninth St. 

La Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and AC( OMPANI^T 



FRED. 



BACON 



TEACHER OF VOICE CULTURE 

Italian Method 
At studio Wednesdav. Thnisdav. Saturday 
SUITE 318 & 319 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTI'liK 
I'lirn Iiallau Hi t I • ... I 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thurs lay and Satn'day 

315 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VO'CE CULTI'liK 

Formerly Soprano with the Hfywood Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, 315 BLANUH ARD Building 

ROLLA K. GARDN E^R 

I1ANJO, MANDOLIN, GUIT«K 

String Orchestra amnio. 23014 South Si ring St 



M I S S M 



PEARSON 



VOICE RUILIJING 

Vocal culture, piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 1922 S. GRAND AVE 



PROF.. M 



A R E V A L O 



GUITAR LESSONS 

Specialties— Technique, Rich T.'ne. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice ( ulture 
Studio, 126 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and First Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Suuday) 
Pasadena mornings Telei hone Main 148 

MUSICAL PRINTING 

TOP NOTCH STYLES 
Concert Programs, Announcement Folders, Fine Engraving 
Best Stationery 

WESTERN GRAPHIC. 
Tel. Main 1053. 311 New High St. 



Western Graphic 



7 





In the 6ay Life 

SOCIETY'S equipages have been wending 
their way — and a truly delightful way — 
for many Sunday afternoons past through the 
fine old grounds of Judge Silent's home which 
has recently been opened as a public avenue 
from Adams street to Twenty-third street. 
To the tenderfoot the very swell looking gate- 
ways are an interrogation whether entree is 
public or not, but a short observation of the 
travel coming and going soon lays the ques- 
tion as to thoroughfare and tender-pedals 
enters. The view thus opened whether to 
tender vision or not is truly one of the choicest 
bits of semi-tropic scenery to be found any- 
where in this region. In fact the broad ave- 
nue bordered in beautiful palmeset in clusters 
of bright flowers might lead a poor wanderer 
to believe a bit of Ceylon's spicy isle or one of 
Calcutta's choicest drives had been trans- 
planted hither for his surprise and pleasure. 
The only one fault is the drive iB too short, 
and if the truth is told the equipages afore- 
said swerve round before reaching the 
Twenty third street end, the Mecca of all 
this pilgrimage being the peculiar red and 
pink sandstone building which is being put 
up by the Posey's — and imposing it i°, — as a 
residence. The fates forbid this chronicler's 
attempting a name for the style of this odd 
structure; let it be Mecca. The yellow, reds 
and salmon pinks surely belong to something 
Mohammedan. The Poseye, by the way, are 
making Coronado their summer home. 

Opinion is divided this year which is to he 
the swell resort of the summer. It seems, 
however, that Santa Monica would win. With 
the Wilcoxes, Miners, Trumans and others of 
that set, friends of the Joneses, and the San 
Francisco contingency, which is toon to fol- 
low this lead, it would seem that Santa 
Monica would pick up the popularity that was 
so summarily swept off the boards two years 
ago and be what it should be, the leading, as 
it is the most charming resort on the coast. 
Mrs. Otheman Stevens among others went 
down last week, making her home at the 
Arcadia. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis are helping 
things at Redondo, which is still the favorite 
summer home of many Angelenos. Terminal 
Island is forging ahead and it is said the 
Gordon Arms will entertain any number of 
swells this summer. 

In town the past week small hospitalities 

MISC ELLANEO U~S 

A. M. E D E L M A N 

ARCHITKCT 
Removed to BLANCHARD MUSIC HAM. BUILDING 

Los Ang eles. Cat. Telephone, Red nil 

G. A. D O B I N S O N 

DRAMATIC TRAINING 
VOICKhihI PHYSICAL ClfLTDRK 
8tudio526S BPBIMG Apply by letter or b tween hours of IO I Jm 

< 
it 
it 
«t 
* 

< 
it 
«t 
* 

* 
«f 
«t 
tf 
it 



* y «j It 



\ Zo Match 



Competent Judges say 
the Same of the 



Rardman piano 



SOLE AGENTS 



LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY 

Phone Green J444 313 S. Broadway. 



have been rare. Tho two daughters of Mr. 
Heinzeman, Miss Henrietta and Miss Augusta, 
were tendered a betrothal supper on Wednes- 
day evening by Mrs. J. \V. Krause. The 
nuptials, with Mr. Edwin H. Ciark atd Mr. 
James Cashin as respective bridegroom", will 
take place some Lime in September. The 
brides to be are very charming young ladies 
and are the recipients of hosts of congratula- 
tions. The guests at the supper included Dr. 
and Mrs. Carl Kurtz, Miss Milner, Miss Hat- 
tie Milner, Miss Kurtz, Mr. and Mrs. Rufus 
Norton, Mr. Edward Heinzeman. 

Among large affairs the lawn fete given 
by Mrs. Caroline M. Severance at her home 
on Adams street was the most prominent, al- 
though disappointing in a way. Modjeska 
was to have lent her presence, a knowledge 
that of course drew increased crowds of guests. 
But she did not come although the leading 
daily papers had her artistically arranged 
somewhere with Professor Starr Jordon on one 
side and Miss Estelle Reel on the other. The 
trouble was her train was delayed and al- 
though many of the guests lingered over 
softened tutti-frutti until the cool of the after- 
noon and until long after the musicians had 
bound up their instruments and the moving 
van had come for the piano yet the expected 
actress did not appear and the company 
dwindled away one by one, which goes to 
show however worthy a work of benevolence, 
and the Free Kindergarten in particular may 
be, the human structure seeks to draw in 
some return for doing its duty. Who would 
blame in this case, for even the poor scribe 
hoped to glean some news in the ways of 
stunning toilette or perhaps a useable word 
from the great actress' lips. 

As it was, the afternoon was a pleasant 
one and drew a number of guests of the cul- 
tured classes and visiting scholars, to have 
been expected with such a veteran enthusiast 
in educational matters as Mme. Severance. 
Dr. Jordan of Stanford, Mr. and Mrs. Town- 
send of Hawaii, Prof. Charles H. Keyes of 
Massachusetts, formerly of Throop, Papadena; 
Mrs. Rachel Dresser, a noted kindergartner, 
and many others lent their presence, not for- 
getting Miss Reel, national superintendent of 
Indian schools, who with her little band of 
fifteen young Indian girls who played in 
mandolin chorus, attracted a great deal of at- 
tention. The fete had the patronage of a 
large number of society women, and assisting 
in extending the "gracefuls" were Mrs. W. H. 
Smith, Mrs. Ira O. Smith, Mrs. Pratt, Mrs. E. 
G. Howard, Mrs. C. C. Williams, Mrs. Kate 
Lenuant Woods, and the Misses Zella Fay, 
Helen North, Wyman, Currey, Isabel (iodin, 
Myra Lindley. 

All of society in town was out in force to 
honor Mrs. (Jenevra Johnstone-Bishop last 
Wednesday afternoon at a reception tendered 
her by Mrs. J. G. Scarborough. All the honor 
was not on one side, however, for enter- 
tainers and guests had the pleasure of bearing 
again the singer's magnificent voice on several 
numbers of a mo.-t enjoyable program, which 
had beside such talent as is well known from 
Mrs. M»dini-Wood, Mrs. Albert Carlos Jones, 
Miss Mary O'Donoughue, Mrs. Orr Harralson, 
the hostess, Mr. H. Russell Ballard and Mr. 
Harry S. Williams. The affair was the most 
noted of the week of a purely social nature. 

Dr. Titian J. Coffey, a graduate of the 
Los Angeles Medical College who has lately 
finished a post-graduate course at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, has assumed the prac- 



tice of Dr. Jarvis Barlow for the year or more 
that he will be in Europe. Mr. Coffee ha* 
many friends who will welcome him back to 
the land of sunshine. 



Tuesday afternoon — Spring street — Father 
and son are discovered in a listening altitude. 
"Father, what is the Times' whistle blowing 
for; do you suppose Otis has been made secre- 
tary of war or is it N.E.A. enthusiasm?" 
Father (with a withering glance at the youth) 
"Neither, my boy, that infernal racket is a 
simon pure advertisement for the Times." 

In the Spring School Division of the 
N.E.A. work is an exhibit that has attracted 
a great thai of attention, both among the 
home visitors as well as those from the East. 
It is the Brownsberger Home School of Short- 
hand and Typewriting, a moBt unique and 
pleaping exhibit of the unaided efforts of the 
present membership of this school. 



Tiik Japanese have been called the "Yan- 
kees of Asia," and as the Yankees of the 
United States have in nothing been more 
famous than in their clock making industries 
the same faculty ought to appear in the king- 
dom of the Mikado to make the comparison a 
just one. And it does. 



That is a peculiar system of law now in 
force in Utah which permits a condemned 
criminal to choose his own method of quitting 
the country for his country's good. Abe Ma- 
jors, who on Tuesday was convicted for the 
murder of a police captain at Brigham City 
selected the rifle ball and he was sentenced to 
be legally shot. 



St\ Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding and Day College for 
Young- Men and Boys 

. .THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
» mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Che Tall term Beflins on mondav, September 4th 

For further information, hcikI for a ru'alngiie 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A UNN, C. M. 



r 



SGHRflMSBLRG 

...WINES... 

The Host Famous of California 

MM Light, Delicate Win,,, 

Matured in Underground §^|? 
Cellars and Bottled with 



1 



mm ""~ ( ;r"7 """ mm 

great care at the V ineyard 



PACIFIC COAST AQINTI 



L 



Sherwood & Sherwood 



I.ob AiixeleH 



Han Kranclaco 



I'nrtlHIlil 



8 



Western Graphic 



Sayings of Visiting School Ma'ams 

Maine Girl — Don't tell all you know; 
keep a little for seed. 

New Hampshire Maid — The trouble with 
the person who doesn't know anything i« that 
he is always telling it to others. 

Vermont Maiden— It is a physical impos- 
sibility for hearts to break, but there are lots 
of cracked brains in this world. 

Massachusetts Teacher — Many school chil- 
dren are like pins, no good when they lose 
their heads. 

Rhode Island Woman — Women are natur- 
ally foolish because they were made to match 
the men. 

Connecticut Principal — I shall be called a 
Ciiiforcia liar when I get home. 

New York Tutor— Some men can hear the 
ring of a silver dollar farther than that of a 
church bell. 

New Jersey Educator — At three score and 
ten we have accumulated enough wisdom to 
enable us to acknowledge our ignorance. 

Pennsylvania Fair One — When a man's 
love grows cold he should put his arm arour.d 
her and warm her up. 

Delaware Instructor — These Southern Cal- 
fornia peaches are very fine — very fine — 
but 

District of Columbia — I am in ecstacies 
over everything. 

Maryland Charmer — These California oys- 
ter cocktails are very appetizing. 

Virginia — The '99 wheel of fortune will be 
a chainless. 

West Virginia — The smaller the hole an 
unruly scholar gets into the louder he howls. 

North Carolina — Modesty never shows up 
to good advantage in the dark. 

South Carolina — The sharper a man is 
the harder it is to make a fool of him. 

Georgia — I cannot help praising your fine 
watermelons — but 

Florida — These late Velencias are deli- 
cious, but 

Alabama — No, I have never ridden a 
bicycle, but I go my best hat on a single 
Wheel- er. 

Mississippi — It is such a good place I shall 
always call it the Van Nice. 

Missouri — I shall not forget that Chamber 
of Commerce elephant. 

Louisiana — Your sugar is excellent, but 
our cane-beet all. 

Kentucky — A long pedigree doesn't pre- 
vent a horse from being the last of his race. 

Tennessee — Veni, Vici, and I want to stay 
forever. 

Ohio— I don't see the man with the hoe to 
any great extent. 

Illinois — The white man's burden is just 
lovely round here. 

Indiana — Southern California is good 
enough for me. 

Michigan — I want to sell my round-trip 
ticket and remain in Los Angeles the rest of 
my life. 

Wisconsin — Maier & Zobelein's pale pilse- 
ner puts me in mind of my own Milwaukee 
potables. 

Iowa — Good-bye to cyclones. I'm not go- 
ing back. 

Minnesota — I find there are other places 
than our own where good flour may be ob- 
tained. 

North Dakota I c , 
South Dakota j So 8a y we a11 of U8 " 



Colorado — Man is made of dust, at least 
some wives think their husbands are. 

Kansas— There is no place like home, yet 
I would not mind staying in Los Angeles an- 
other week or two. 

Nebraska — I have arrived at the happy 
land of Canaan at last. 

Arkansas — I wish some young man with 
an orange grove would propose to me. 

Oklahoma — No, we never teach the young 
idea how to shoot in our country. 

Indian Territory — Even your Cherokee 
rose is finer than ours. 

Texas — Too many young men empty their 
sand boxes on the first grade. 



Idaho — Tbe miner cannot hope to succeed 
unless he gets down to business. 

Oregon — No matter what a girl's political 
belief is she always wants protection. 

Washington — Travel often broadens a per- 
son's mind and especially if it takes him to 
Los Angeles. 

Alaska — When it comes to going to 
Southern California it is a cold day when I 
get left. 

Hawaii — And we too are in it. 
Guam — We too. 
Porto Rico — We too. 
Philippines — We too. 
California — Thanks, awfully. 




If not N. E. A.'s, it cau be truthfully said that these young men and women 
were N-ever E-xcelled A nywliere for brains and mettle. They are the editors 
of "Blue and White," the '99 annual of the Los Angeles High School, which 
redounds to their credit from cover to cover. Now witty, now serious; now 
sentimental, now severe, it is an interesting epitome of a year's school life, and in 
years to come will be a priceless treasure to the members of the Summer Class 
of '99. 




New Mexico — The poet who writes poor 
verses is apt to accuse the editor of having 
poor judgment. 

Arizona — Why, dont' you know we heav 
no paper called the Arizona Kicker? 

Wyoming — How glad I am I came. 

Nevada — The silver lining to our cloud 
doesn't amount to much nowadays. 

Utah — The woman who thinks all men 
are angels had better remain singh and 
nurse the delusion. 

Montana — The only way to convince a 
girl that all men are not angels is to let her 
marry one. 



The well known Otlinger's Railway Ticket 
Office has established an office in this city at 
212 South Spring street. Under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Magnus this office can give pat- 
rons the benefit of its connections with the 
San Francisco and Portland branches and 
business relations with ticket brokers' offices 
in all parts of the United States. They book 
to all parts of the world and are agents for 
several of the best known steamship lines. 
Their motto and guarantee is to save money 
for travelers, and their guarantee is as good 
as gold. 



Western Graphic 



A LOST ART 

THE mere reminder that we are incap- 
able of matching today the giants of 
the pen, the brush, the chisel, the lyre and so 
forth, who flourished before our time, would 
be chastening enough by itself, but there are 
those who do not hesitate to assert that we 
have lost the social arts as well. They refer 
us back to the studied elegance and charm, 
the wit and sparkle that characterized social 
intercourse, on its higher planes, but a few 
generations ago and protest that the lost art 
which there is greatest cause to lament is the 
art of conversation. What remains, they 
ask, of the faculty of dainty badinage and 
ready repartee that once contributed so much 
to the building up of social reputations? 
What of the once sedulously cultivated skill 
in the turning of polished phrase and grace- 
ful compliment? Where are these accom- 
plishments to be looked for among a genera- 
tion that would be aghast at the very idea of 
talking for talk's sake and that restricts its 
interchange of ideas mainly to a comparison 
of notes about its social engagements, its ail- 
ments and its bicycles? 

We may deny that the loss of the "ele- 
gant" conversation of a more artifical period 
is in any way a subject for regret; but the 
fact that it is lost admits of no dispute. People 
do not meet nowadays to "exchange ideas" 
and entertain one another with elaborate com- 
pliment and displays of conversational agility. 
They pimply chatter, more often in the per- 
functory discharge of the obligation to say 
something than because they have anything 
particular to say. So generally recognized, 
indeed, is the conversational barrenness of 
the time, that some well meaning hostesses 
have positively been attempting of late to 
co me to the rescue by providing each pair of 
their dinner guests with a supplement to the 
menu containing proposed topics for discus- 
sion during the repast. They have forgotten, 
however, that to bring a horse to the water 
is not necessarily to induce him to drink. 
Even when the subjects thus provided did not 
happen to be hopelessly unintelligible or un- 
interesting to those to whom they were offered 
the efficacy of such a recourse must needs be 
little enough, so long as the once cherished 
art of talking remains generally neglected and 
anything beyond the spasmodic interchange 
of perfunctory gossip and superficial opinion 
is shunned as "old-fashioned" and tabooed as 
a bore. 

This is, however, distinctly an age of re- 
vivals, and it has been proposed that there be 
established a school for the purpose of teach- 
ing the youth of the land how to get back 
into the fine old style of our ancestors. There 
is no denying that the present young people 
talk in a careless, slangy strain, altogether too 
loose in thought and expression to lay any 
claim to excellence. While it would be diffi- 
cult to convince the boys and girls of today 
that they are in any need of improvement in 
the line of talking it might be possible to 
make the repartee so sharp, the compliments 
so quaint, the phrases so well turned that they 
would charm from their originality alone. 



The dashing autotruck may come, 

The horseless carriage, too; 
The elements may do the work 

That horses now must do; 
But as long as men keep striving on 

For fortune or for fame 
You'll find that money'll always make 

The "mare go" just the same. 



& 



<Hbm Cool Breezes Blow I 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 



SANTA MONICA 

SANTA MONICA is now in the midst of 
its season and there is no day nor evening 
that great crowds do not come down to enjoy 
the precious wind and wave. Sundays are 
the great days, though, and there can have 
been few under ten thousand here on Sunday 
last. There are no such things as hot nights 
at Santa Monica, and it is without doubt the 
best all the year round sleeping place in the 
world. 

Surely Santa Monica is on the march of 
improvement this year, and much has been 
done to make the place attractive to all. The 
beachts and bath houses are all in splendid 
order, and the fishing is very good from both 
wharves. 

One of the public-spirited residents here — 
Mr. Gillis — has lately purchased a lot of land 
on the beach north of the bathhouse from 
Mrs. Baker and contemplates laying out some 
of it in pretty cottage sites upon some of 
which he will bu'.ld summer places for rent- 
ing. In this connection it is worthy of re- 
mark that nobody ever bought land in Santa 
Monica and held on to it that did not make 
money by the transaction. At present Santa 
Monica is a lovely little city of from three 
thousand to thirty-five hundred inhabitants. 
The residences are of a substantial order, and 
in some cases, as in that of Miramar, the 
residence of United States Senator John P. 
Jones, they rise to the dignity of downright 
splendor. The grounds of even the least pre- 
tentious residences are always bright and 
attractive. 

Schools and churches abound on all hands, 
most of the leading Christian denominations 
being represented. A new power house sup- 
plies an unfailing demand for electricity and 
a new sewer system has recently been com- 
pleted. Well equipped hotels are here, and 
the Arcadia, conducted by Frank Miller, is 
one of the handsomest and best kept hostelries 
on the Pacific Coast. Mine host Eckert makes 
his place a favorite resort for all who want 
fish dinners and the like. Santa Monica has 
broad and well shaded streets, the leading 
thoroughfares being well sprinkled. A well 
stocked public library assists the visitor in 
vvhiling away the time. 

Of course, with such a beach, the bathing 
appointments, both those of the Hotel Arcadia 
and those of the North Beach, are superb. 
The latter is supplied with enormous tanks, 
in which multitudes disport themselves in 
heated water. It is equal to anything of the 
kind on either the Atlantic or Pacific Coast, 
as it has added many improvements during 
the past few months. 

It is simply impossible to exaggerate the 
attractions of the climate of Santa Monica. 
It is a much mooted question as to whether 
its summer or its winter climate is the more 
agreeable. The Duke of Sutherland and the 
celebrated Dr. Russell, the latter the famous 
war correspondent of the London Times, pro- 
nounced it the best beach they ever saw, a 
judgment which Dr Russell reiterated in his 
book in very strong terms. It is indeed hard 



to say enough of the charm of the surf bath- 
ing in Santa Monica. 

Take it for all in all there is no place on 
the American continent where one can spend 
all the months more pleasantly than at Santa 
Monica. We have forborne to dwell on the 

SANTA MONICA 



i 



Hotel flrcatlia 




TA MONICA 
ORNIA 

The New Grill 

Koom 
The Dinl in; 

Room 
The Parlors 
All Look 
Toward tin Sea 

It seems to mo I'd like to go 

where bells don't nog nor whistles blow, 

Nor dorks don't snike, nor gongs don't sound. 

And I'd have stillness all mound. 

Such as you hear by ocean's side, 

Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 

Where air is pure and heart is free, 

'I hat's surely where I'd like to be. 

If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 

I'd like the city pretty well; 

But when it comes to getting rest 

I like the Country lots the best. 

Sometimes it seems to me 1 must 

Just quit the city's din atid dust, 

Ami get out where the sky is blue, 

And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

—Eugene Held, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 

f Frank A. Miller < '*'fit® ■ ', 




HOMES 

BY THE SE,fl 



Ocean 
Pp rk 



KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Fleganl beach, Water pi|>ed to tract. 
Electric light connection. I.oug lease, SIO to $2f> 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever OfTered to secure a >anta 
Monica Home 

Ocean flir Ocean Beach Ocean Bathing 

L. B. OSBORN, Agent 

Office, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



\ Fine Fish 
\ Dinners 

No tourist considers a visit to California ^K. 

I complete until he has vi»ited Santa Monica ami WW 

no one seeking a .Summer Kesoit thinks of over- sfX 

/ looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ex- WW 

. tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, ^JX 

/ mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc , which are to be WW 

obtained at the famous r< stiiurant, overlooking 

/ the ocean. WW 

? THE PAVILION X 

j ECKERT & UOPF, Props. 3K| 



The North Beach 
Bath House 



I las perfected an arrangement l>y 
which the water in the plunge will he entirely 
changed daily. This year a gieal deal ol tnOMJ 
has heen put into permanent improvements in 
and around the hath house and it will he the 
aim of the management to caler to the best class 
of people, by providing eyery thing for their 
comfort and convenience We may say to our 
old patrons that they will hardly recogtme the 
place on account of changes for the better. 



10 



Western Graphic 



poetical charms of the place. With a spread 
of water as beautiful as the famed bay of 
Naples, the place has a climate which is no- 
where rivaled in the Riviera. There is no 
month in the year in which bathing in the 
ocean may not be enjoyed by a person in or- 
dinary health. The society is all that could 
be desired at all seasons of the year, while in 
summer, particularly, it is the Mecca of many 
of the fashionable flock of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

TERMINAL ISLAND 

WE of Terminal Island feel that we 
have a right to luxuriate in the won- 
derful change that has transformed a sand 
spit into one of the most fashionable and 
popular resorts on the southern coast. With 
the opening of the Gordon Arms Terminal 
takes its place with the best of them and not 
the least alluring feature of our attractions 
will be the weekly Cinderella hops at the 
hotel, which were inaugurated with a jolly 
crowd last Saturday evening. Cottagers and 
their friends and a number of the butterfly 
set of this city and Pasadena made the even- 
ing a gay one and Cinderella thoughtfully 
set the clock backward, "for just this once, 
you know." 

Mr. W. D. Ainsworth entertained a party 
of twelve at luncheon on Sunday 

Many enjoyable fishing, yachting and 
bathing parties have been indulged in during 
the past week by the guests of the hotel. 

The Indian Band of World's Fair fame, 
played on the veranda of the hotel during 
luncheon on Sunday. 

The Misses Gordon of Pasadena are spend- 
ing a few weeks at the Gordon Arms. 

Miss Adale Anderson of Chicago is a guest 
at the Gordon Arms. 

Among the guests registered at the hotel 
during the past week are James W. Mac- 
donald, Mrs. Easton, Misses Easton, Mrs. 
Mullins, Miss Bean, Mrs. J. G. Easton, Mr. 
Ling Easton, Mr. Lon Pratt, Mr. Lane Has- 
kins, Dr. Brook Alexander, W. D. Ainsworth, 
W. G. Young, L. Ogden and wife, Charles C. 
Judson and wife, C. W. Judson, Miss P. L. 
Judson, L. M. Kelsey and wife and daughter, 
VV. H. Holmes, G. M. Nortman, C. L. Rug- 
gles of Philadelphia, Dr. Lemuel Willard of 
Chicago, Mi?s Mary F. Willard of Chicago, 
R. D. Bronson, Mrs. Fred O. Johnson, W. P. 
Cole, Mrs. J. H. Jones, Mrs. H. Scott, Mrs. 
Chas. Winters, Dan P. Jones, J. W. Hughes 
of Pasadena, D. L. Groesbeck of Pasadena, 
E. M. Latham and wife, Miss Spellan of San 
Francisco, D. M. Thomas, A. Sturtevant, 
Frank K. Wilson and wife, Carl Newberger, 
Herman Kobbe, R L Reynolds of Pasadena, 
K. C. McFarran and child from Durango, 
Mexico. 



REDONDO BEACH 

THE principal topic of interest in Re- 
dondo social circles is the open handi- 
cap tennis tournament which will be held on 
the Redondo courts Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday of next week. Entries are already 
coming in fast and should all be made by 
Tuesday. Any information in regard to the 
tournament may be had by applying to R. A. 
Rowan, 214 Wilcox building, Los Angeles, or 
Hotel Redondo. The full dress tennis ball 
Saturday evening will be one of the leading 
social events of the summer season and is de- 
lightfully anticipated by the young society 
people of Los AngeleB and vicinity. 



The hop last Saturday evening was very 
enjoyable and was closed with a few figures of 
the german skillfully arranged by Mr. Wm. 
Watson Levett of Los Angeles. The four 
couples leading were Mr. and Mrs. Levett, H. 
B. Ainsworth and Miss Waddell, W. R. Norris 
and Miss Sargent, Mr. Terry and Miss Lor- 
ing. 

The guests of the hotel enjoyed their regu- 
lar swimming party at the plunge Monday 
evening and F. C. Bolt and Miss Margery 
Bolt of Pasadena made a pleasant addition to 
the usual number. 

Miss Laura Solano succeeded in breaking 
the ladies' golf record on the Redondo courts 
before her departure last Monday by making 
the nine holes in 47. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Solano, Miss Solano 
and Miss Nelson, who have been spending 
several months at Hotel Redondo, have re- 
turned to Los Angeles and Mr. and Mrs. So- 
lano will leave almost immediately for a Eu- 
ropean trip. Miss Nelson will accompany 
them. Miss Solano will spend the summer 
in the east. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Lewis of Los Angeles 
who were at their cottage here for the summer 
have been obliged to return home on account 
of the ill health of Mrs. Lewis' mother, Mrs. 
Duncan. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis arrived this 
week to remain at the hotel for the rest of the 
season. 

Among prominent Pasadena people at the 
hotel for an extended stay are Mr. and Mrs. 
F. C. Bolt, Mrs. E. F. Bowler, Miss Stickney, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Swan, Miss Franc Bolt 
and Miss Margery Bolt. 

.C. R. Holterhoff, Jr., was among last Sun- 
day's visitors at Redondo. 

There has been a large party of members 
of the N.E.A. dining at the hotel every day 
this week frequently to the number of forty. 



one that was not caught, but F. S. Gerrish 
and E. L. Doran fought hini for four and a 
quarter hours and were towed about eighteen 
miles. 



CATALINA ISLAND 

ON every Saturday's steamer comes the 
"over Sunday" crowds who dance and 
fish and swim and get red faces for a night and 
a day and spend the rest of the week in the 
hot city toiling and peeling and trying new 
brands of face lotion, all the while looking 
forward to the next Saturday night when they 
may again hie themselves to the delightful 
little lump of dirt caressed by the waves of 
the Pacific. People will do more hard work 
in their ecstacy of enjoyment than could be 
got out of the army in the Philippines with 
a promise of a chicken dinner. 

Great crowds of shirt-waisted school 
maams and a few lonesome men availed 
themselves of the excursion this week, and 
those of us islanders who consider ourselves 
Bummer fixtures felt like a drop in a bucket 
but did our best to entertain them. Among 
the late arrivals at the aquarium are two 
large Poet Jackson horned sharks, two drum 
fishes, the drumming of which can be heard 
across the long building. These fishes are re- 
markable for a series of mother of y.earl spots 
along the sides in double rows. The light 
from their luminous organs is decidedly no- 
ticable. Another interesting addition is an 
eel nearly five feet long which was caught by 
J. H. Holbrook Tuesday. It is about the 
most repulsive thing that could bo imagined 
and made a regular circus when a crowd of 
men and boys were putting it in the tank. 
One young man remarked that if it was any- 
thing like that the boys saw he would confine 
himself hereafter to milk shakes and "tea- 
kettle tea." 

The biggest fi-h of the week was, of course, 



I OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST., Los Ang»les, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour Irom 6.30 a m "to 7.30 v 
p.m., 8 30. 'J.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LEAVE BAND STAND, .Santa Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three quurter from 5.4.S a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.45, 9.45, li'.4.V 



SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 

ftanta Gatailna island j 



Three and one-half hour* from L(H Angeles 

The Or eat eat Keaort 

The Love iest Sea»on of the Year 

Climate near Perfection 

Phenomenal Fishing and Hunting 

The great Stage ltlde 



API'OINTMKNTS 



^ flllqtM 



Modern HOTEL 

METROPOLE | 



ie exclusive attractions 
The Famed Marine Gardens as viewed 

from the glass bottomed boa s 
The best and most picturesque Golf Links 
Round t ri |> every day from Lii8 Angeles 

iree lion t s on the i • laud 



tff Sunday excursions, tin 
9 See IE. B. time tables 



For fd] information, illustrated pamphle s and 
rates apply to 



BANNING CO. J 

^ Tel. M 3b 222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles | 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 




Hotel jt sT Completed ^^^^ 
Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 

Bath house in connec- 
Kates SI to *4 a day BS$ Hon with hotel. Finest 
Special rates on beach and surf bathing on 

application *g !\ olf •J"* 8 . ?, Ht,nt ; 

Zal ">K. fishing. Ten miles of 

S. P. Anderson M f$ ™% ***** 

Manager §B3 1 6 



T he Attractive Route 

To the Favorite Sea Side 
Hcsorts is the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




I Terminal Island, Bythesea 

I Catalina Island San Pedro 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and 
& most delightful places 

<£> and only a short ride from Los Angeles, where can be 
y found the finest Open Sea Bathing, Yachting and 
$ Fishing on the Pacific coast. 

Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket 
Office, 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. 
8. B. Hynes, Gen. Mgr. T. C. Peck, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept. 



Western Graphic 



11 



R E DO N D O 



VVVVVV*VVVVVV<*VV%VVVVVVVVVVVW V. . 



mo i 




* Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



* 
* 

* 

* 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 

Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn- 
aments. 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 



Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 



S Transient Rates S2.50to 84. 

j, Special Weekly Rates 

* 

* H. R. WARNER, Prop. 




Santa Fe Route 



Summer Time Table 

Daily Service 
Leaves Los ADgeles 9.'>5 a. m. 1.30 p.m. 
Arrives at Redondo l".35a. m, 2.10 p.m. 

Sunday Service 
Leaves Los Angeles 8.30 a.m. 9.55 a.m. 

1.30 p. m. 5.35 p. m. 
Arrives at Redor do 9.10 a.m. 10 35 a.m. 

2.10 p.m. 6.10 p.m. 
Last Train Returning Leaves Redondo 

Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



5.35 p. 
6 lOp. 



7.00 p. m. 

7 40 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 



Los flnaeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4, 1899! © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Every day 9.80 am 1.30 p m 5.80 p m 
Sundays 8.10 am 9.30 a in 10.15 am 
1.30 pm 5.30 pm 7.00 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for Los Angeles 

Everyday 8.00 a m 11. 00am 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a m 8.00 a m 9.80 a in 
11.00 am 4.15 pm 5 45 pm 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Redondo fi 30pm 
returning leaves Los Ange ei 11.30 p m 

Ciiy Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

L.J. PERRY, Superintendent 



BUNDY'S 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottnges Lighted by Acety- 
lene Gas. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



5 



Elsinore 
Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z. BUNDY, Prop 

Bates per week-88, 89, and 810, includ- 
ing Hot Sulphur 
sumptives taken 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 





Cown Calk and prattle 




SINCE GOLF became popular the costumes 
of the golfer and the cycler have been al 
most identical, but this yeir the two sports 
seem to have come to a fork in the road where 
their paths diverge and henceforth each class 
will have a distinctive style. 

It will not be the wheelman to change, for 
he is very well satisfied with his garb, but the 
man who gets his fun out of pounding a little 
gutta percha ball with long sticks with odd- 
sounding names has made up his mind to 
switch styles and the result will be almost a 
new dress for the golf enthusiast. 

The bicycle rider will stick to his swell-cut 
knickerbockers, the only change being that 
they will be cut a trifle different. Instead of 
wide, baggy trousers, ending up with golf 
bands at the knees, his tailor will make them 
on a sort of taper, like riding breeches, and 
instead of golf bands will substitute the old- 
fashioned buckle which did duty when N. H. 
Van Sicklen, the Chicago rider, imported the 
first bloomer suit ever worn in this country 
by a wheelman. This has been found to give 
better satisfaction than the other style, for 
with the buckle there is no binding at the 
knee, and the tailor can turn out a better- 
looking garment. 

But the golf band will not be discarded 
entirely, for there are those who will stick to 
this style. There will be modifications to the 
old style, however, and in place of a band 
some six inches in length and made of stiff 
cloth, there will be small bands just long 
enough for two buttons. Then there will be 
bands made of the same cloth as the rest of 
the trousers, being simply a continuation of 
the leg, with buttons to fasten with. 

Checks will continue to be popular for the 
nether garment, although some of the ultra- 
swell will stick out for trousers of the same 
material and color as the coat. This com- 
bination makes a jaunty suit and one that 
will suit the most quiet taste. 

In the matter of caps there will be some 
change. There have been changes in head- 
gear every spring for the last five or six years 
and now the manufacturer seem to have 
struck the right thing at last. Formerly it 
was the proper caper to wear a small cap, 
just large enough to stick on two or three 
hairs on the crown of the head. Then the 
Stanley cap had a run and now the cap fash- 
ioned after the golfing style finds favor in the 
eyes of the wheelmen. Not the huge headgear 
flopping down over the ears, but a neat-ap- 
pearing cap, with a reasonably eized peak and 
generally made of the same material as the 
trousers. One of the latest conceits in this 
line has been adopted from the golfing world 
and is a silk cap made of fancy -colored Scotch 
plaid and so light and airy that one has to 
feel twice before he is sure that he has any 
cap on at all. Of couree a new thing costs 
money and as much as $2 can be invested in 
such a cap. 

Neglige shirts will be far more popular 
than the sweater. This latter garment will 
be used more for long country runs and in 
cold weather than for city riding. For early 
summer wear the plaited-front shirt will have 



the call, the bosom being stiff enough to keep 
out the chilly breezt-s. As really hot 
weather approaches these plaited fronts will 
be discarded, and in their places will come 
the regulation neglige. With these shirts 
will go collars and cuffs of the same color as 
the body of the shirt. There is something 
new in the way of collars, a neat turn-down 
with rounded edges. These collars will be 
most comfortable a* well as adding to one's 
appearance. The cufl-s will be attatched or 
detatched according to the will of the pur- 
chaser. 

For ties those who desire to cut a swell 
will use English twilled silk string or wash- 
able ties of Madras or Oxford. 

There will be a variety of styles in coats, 
with no marked preference. The box coat 
will continue in favor and in most cases be 
blue to accompany the checked trousers. 
Vests will not be worn except for morning or 
evening riiling, when the weather is so chilly 
as to demand the extra garment. 

Among the cycling clubs there is not so 
much talk of club uniforms as in the past, 
and the chances are that this summer there 
will be few clubs to adopt such a costume, 
leaving the matter of dress to the discretion 
of the members. Club uniforms were all 
right in the early days of the sport, but at 
present time the club member does not like to 
wear such distinctive clothing. Another rea- 
son for the falling off in demand for uniforms 
is the fact that if a club does have a neat uni- 
forms it is not long before every Tom, Dick 
and Harry in town has one like it, so that 
the purpose for which it was adopted is lost 
sight of. In the eastern cities, however, the 
uniform continues in popularity. 

Getting down to the question of proper 
dress for golfers it will be found that a most 
radical departure in style has been made this 
year. Knickerbockers have been given the 
go-by and discarded by many as not being as 
suitable for the sport as the new dress 
adopted. In place of the short trousers there 
will be long ones, which is said to be most 
suitable, because the golfer is with the ladies 
so much, and there is no reason why the long 
trousers should not be worn. 

With the long trousers to be worn by the 
gentleman golfer will go a tight-fitting jersey 
jacket, with silk sleeves, in red, green or a 
combination of the two colors. The silk 
sleeves are for the purpose of allowing more 
freedom to the arms. When a coat is worn it 
is generally of the same color as the trouserB. - 
White flannel will be in demand. With tin 
flannel suit will go the white flannel cap. The 
new gold golf cap of fancy colored silks will 
also be worn. 

The woman who finds enjoyment in golf 
will wear the tight fitting jersey j icket, with 
silk sleeves, a white pique skirt and a jaunty 
little white cap of the same material. 

Just issued from a Los Angeles press is 
''Arizona and Its Resources,'' a quarto publica- 
tion of seventy-six pages filled with fine half- 
tone illustrations and comprehensive letter- 
press upon subjects suggested by the title of 
the work. J. M. Reuck is the promoter of the 
publication, with whom have been associated 
A. B. Rich and John Isaacs, editor. 



12 



Western Graphic 



HOW SILAS WENT A-FISHING 

OH, Si! Si! Silus! Silus! Why don't 
thet feller answer? I know he's nigh 
here fer I jest seed his shadder pass the door 
this minit." 

The speaker was addressing herself. She 
was tall, angular and had a set determined 
jaw that bespoke the disposition of one born 
to rule. 

"Silus, ef you don't answer this minit I'll 
make it mighty interestin' fer ye." 

"Yesum," came a coarse heavy voice from 
outside of the open cabin door. The voice 
was deep and heavy, but its tones were placat- 
ing. 

"Come in this ainit, I say." 

"Yesum," came the deep bass voice again, 
and the speaker followed the answer through 
the open door. 

Si was scarce rive feet tall. His hair was 
red and long. A two week's growth of red- 
dish beard covered his face, which was shaded 
by a wide brimmed felt hat that at one time 
had been of a soft grey, but was now of a 
6treaked pattern outlined by grease and dirt. 
He wore a dirty blue blouse and overalls. A 
corncob pipe, which had been blackened with 
long service, was sticking from his mouth. 

Si stood in the middle of the cabin floor 
and looked appealing at the woman who had 
stationed herself by the table which stood 
under the window. The soiled dishes from 
the noon day meal were piled upon the table. 

"What do yer want Sallie?" queried Si, in 
the same deep toned placating voice. 

"Whut do I want? Silus Quimby, I'm 
sprised to hear yer ask sich er fool question. 
What do I want? Well, did yer ever? Do 
yer spect I'm a standin' here a yelling my 
lungs out er callin' fer yer ef I didn't want 
nuthin'? Uv couse I don't want nuthin';I'm 
perfectly happy, I is," and she sat down in 
the nearest chair and heaved a eigh that be- 
tokened good lungs. 

"Yesum," replied Si. 

"I haint never wanted nuthin', end I 
needn't ever spect nuthin' nuther. Here I 
am jist ez sick ez I kin be, end you sittin' out 
thar in ther sun a sunnin' yerself jest ez lazy 
ez a lizard, end with no more thought fer eny 
one then a lizard. Silus Quimby, you er the 
orneryst man ezever drawed ther breth uv life. 
Yer no sooner git the dinner end eat et but 
whut yer skin out'n the cabin a hopin' I'm a 
goin' to slave fer yer end wash up the things. 
Eny great big husky man ez kin swaller his 
vitlus like you kin orter be eshamed uv hiself 
end not let his poor little sick wife hev terfuss 
over his dirty diehes. Now yer git in end 
wash 'em up this minit, for I kaint stand ter 
be fretted all ther time." 

"Yesum," came the same deep monotone. 

Si filled the dish pan with water and pro- 
ceeded to wash and wipe the dishes, and the 
manner in which he went about the work 
showed that he had had long practice in the 
art. 

The woman rose from her chair and crossed 
over the room to an old rocking chair that 
had only one arm, and which creaked and 
squeaked in a complaining tone under her 
weight as she rocked to and fro. 

"Now Silus Quimby, yer aint a goin' fish- 
in' this evenin' ef I know myself; end I think 
I do," and her head gave a decided jerk and 
toss as she snapped the words out of her 
mouth. 



"Yer thought yer wuz purty cute this here 
forenoon arter yer got though with yer break- 
fust things end went er sneakin' end er slip- 
pin' up ther holler en ther tall willers a grub- 
bin' up fishin' wurms. Now yer needn't try 
ter lie out uv et, fer didn't I go out end see 
with my own two eyes thet the grub hoe wuz 
gone, end didn't I foller yer up there through 
all thet wet end slush uv the swamp to jist 
see whut yer wuz up to, end didn't I see yer a 
grubbin' end a grubbin' fer them thar nasty 
squirmin' wurms, end didn't I see with my 
own two eyes my husband, Silus Quimby, a 
havin' uv a tin eyester can a pickin' uv the 
nasty, dirty things up end a puttin' uv 'um 
in thet can. Yes, I did. End me, a poor, 
sick, little woman thet kin scursly eat a full 
meal uv vitles, a sittin' on a log er watchin' 
her husband fur a hull hour; end mewith wet 
feet et thet. Oh, dearey me, whut will ever 
become uv me?" 

Back and forth went the rocking chair fas- 
ter than ever, creaking and groaning, keeping 
time to the motion of her waving hands. 

"Yesum," came the monotone, and the 
rattle of knives and forks went on as Silas 
washed and wiped. 

"Whur did yer put them wurms, Silus?" 
asked the woman in a quick firm tone. 

"Whut wurms, Sallie?" replied Silas. 

"Whut wurms? Yes, whut wurms? Silus, 
aint yer ever a goin' ter learn thet a liar ez 
bound ter be found out? You know whut 
wurms I wuz refcrrin' to, end I want yer ter 
know rite now thet yer can't fool me. Yer 
may be a thinkin' thet I'm a gittin' simple 
arter bein' sick en suffering so long en much, 
but I kin foller yer trail all day end never 
lose ther scent. Silus Quimby, I wuz a refer- 
rin' to ther wurms you wuz a diggin' this 
mornin' arter yer got through with the dish 
washin'. Now speak up mighty smart. Where 
did yer put them wurms?" 

"Yesum. I put 'em in en evster can." 

"Silus Quimby, I haint a goin' ter have 
no foolin'. Where did yer put ther can?" 

"Yesum. I put ther can en a hole." 

"Silus Quimby, yer aint a goin' ter lead 
me estray by yer cunnin' answers. Where 
wuz thet hole?" 

"Yesum, ther hole wuz en ther ground." 

"Silus, I alers said yer wuz the provokin- 
est human critter ez ever walked on two legs. 
Now answer me right to ther pint. Whur 
wuz ther ground thet ther hole wuz in?" 

"Yes'm, ther ground wuz out in ther wil- 
lers." 

"Silus, you know ez how you is a tryin' to 
deceive me, a poor, trustin' woman, with one 
foot almost on the very aige uv ther grave, 
and yer won't tell me the truth. Yer know 
thet them willers runs fer miles up end down 
this canyun, end I caint ever find them wurms 
unless yer tell me jist whur them is. Whut 
part uv ther willers did yer put them in ther 
hole in ther ground? Now thar, answer me 
quick; quick, I say, er et'll go harder with 
yer." 

"Yes'm. I put 'em out in the thick wil- 
lers, Sallie." 

• "Now Silus, ez yer hev get them things all 
slicked up, yer jest patter right out thar end 
get them wurms end bring 'em right in here 
end I'll see thet they don't ketch no fish." 

Si pulled his hat down over his eyes and 
went out of the cabin. He started up the 
creek bottom on a slow walk and he was evi- 
dently studying deeply. 

"Silus, Silus!" called Sallie from the cabin 



door. Yer needn't try end fool me, end yer 
hed better bring every one uv them wurms 
down here. Yer kaint save a one uv 'em, so 
don't yer be a lookin' fer enuther can to put 
part uv 'em in; jist bring 'em all along with 
yer." 

"Yes'm," replied Silas, and he quickened 
his gait. 

He soon came back with the oyster can 
half filled with the wriggling and squirming 
worms. Sallie took the can and looking into 
it gave a shudder and gasp. 

"Oh, Silus Quimby, how kin yer ever, ever 
be so low minded ez ter ever tech one uv 'em. 
Now yer jist foller me end we'll see how much 
fishin' yer a going to git out'n these wurms." 

She marched out of the cabin with a 
stately tread to the corral where the busy 
hens were scratching around looking for their 
mid-day meal. 

Swish, and all the worms were thrown 
down in a squirming mass before the aston- 
ished and hungry fowls who at once devoured 
the last one of them. 

"Now, Silas Quimby, the next time yer 
try to deceive me in this shameful kinder way 
yer goin' to git sarved jist ther same way. 
Now, ez I hev hed ez much ez I kin stand fur 



VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVWVVVVVVVVVVVV 




Pboto= 
graphic 
Supplies i 



tel. m 1:91 



*^«*»ftAftftftftftftft«*»ftftftftftftft«Aftftft«ftft»* 



L 



W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and filter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. 'be only 
manufacturer in S. Californin. Rtmember the 
number, 213 W. Fourth St. 



HALT! 



There la a 




Military Boarding 
SgHooi 



In Southern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Hade 
Military Training; Manly 

Parents will And our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful In deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sons. Mailed free upon application. 

Los Angeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Kinnry, A. M., Principal, 
Walter It. Wheat Mh ager 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Cbe palace 

A Select Family Ke ort 

Patronized by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly fitted, co>il in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Kamily Orchestra in 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
\l o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
ICegtaurant and Refreshments 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS ' 

55c, 65c to 90c vd, 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 
5oc. 05c to 75c vd. 
LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 

40c to 90C. So to 50c 

REFRIGERATORS »5, »7.50 to *20 

I. T. MARTIN, 531-535 So. Spring SI. 
Wheel Chairs sold or rented. 




Western Graphic 



13 



one day, I'm a goin' to lay down en try end 
git sum rest." 

"Yer take the hoe and go end hoe them 
taters good, end git 'em ready fer irrigatin', 
too." 

'"Yes'm," replied Si, and his eyes were 
riveted upon the ground, while one toe of his 
enormous cow-hide shoe was working at a 
small stone in the ground as though to loosen 
it. 

Sallie returned to the cabin door, and be- 
fore entering she turned and as a parting 
warning said: "Ef I git sum good sleep end 
feel well enuf whin I wake up I'll cum out 
end see how yer a gittin' long hoin' by-end- 
by." 

Silas picked up his hoe and started for the 
potato patch. The trail led along side of the 
running brook, and its laughing, jumping 
waters held forth such a winning invitation 
to sit and rest beside their banks and listen 
to their tale of joy and freedom. 

A squirrel with great bushy tail climbed 
an alder and with bright beady eyes sat upon 
a limb barking and scolding at Si as much as 
to say: "See how free am I." 

A bird with bright yellow upon his breast 
sat swinging upon a bending bow, singing as 
though his very bosom would burst for joy 
unless he could tell the world how free he 
was. 

Down through the potato patch Si walked 
and upon reaching the lower end he stuck the 
hoe in the ground and walked on down into 
the willows that bordered the stream. As he 
reached the edge of the willows he stopped 
and looked up the trail towards the house. 
"No, I reckon she won't come for a while yit," 
soliloquized Si. 

He pulled out hi3 knife and cut a long, 
slim willow and carefully lopped off the 
ranches and extracted from his pocket a fish 



line and hook which he fastened to the end of 
the pole. The bushes parted and Silas disap- 
peared from view. He had gone a-fishing. 

The afternoon sun had sunk low down 
toward the mountains in the west. The sound 
of mate-calling quail came from the hill 
sides. Twittering birds were Hitting from 
tree to tree selecting their resting places for 
the fast approaching night. The low moo of 
a cow came from up the canyon as she was 
waiting at the pasture bars for the maBter to 
come and let her through for she was impa- 
tient to see her calf which had spent the day 
carefully locked in the corral. 

The hoe stuck in the ground just where it 
landed when Si left it. 

The bushes parted and Si came into view 
with a string of pretty trout. He cautiously 
looked all around about. Seeing nothing to 
hinder him he walked over to the hoe, picked 
it up and started for the house. 

He reached the upper end of the potato 
patch when his eyes caught sight of a sun- 
bonnet through the boughs by the creek. He 
quickened his steps and met Sallie before she 
had reached the edge of the clearing. The 
string of fish was hung over his back and 
was not visible from the front. 

"Si, I jist thot I'd cum end see how yer 
wuz gittin' on," remarked Sallie as she gave 
him a searching glance which seemed to take 
him in even to the fresh earth upon the hoe 
blade. "How did yer git on, Si, with ther 
hoin'?" 

"Purty well, Sallie," replied Si. "I'm er 
guessin' I'll git dun 'ith 'em termorrer." 

He faced Sallie and seemed to be waiting 
for her to take the lead for the return home. 
She seemed to wait for him to go first through 
the narrow trail. He shifted from one foot to 
the other. He glanced up the trail and down 
the trail, looked at the tops of the mountains 



and at his feet. His eyes roamed all over. 
Drops of sweat commenced to ooze from un- 
der his hat band. Sallie noticed his confusion 
and said sternly: ''Silas Quimby, git fer home 
and git the cow milked this instant. Whut 
hev yer been er doin'?" 

Si started up the trail and Sallie fell in 
behind. Her eyes caught sight of the fish. 

"Silus Quimby, I thot I hed fed all uv 
them tishin' wurms to the hens. Did you go 
end dig sum more uv 'em arter all I dun end 
sed?" 

''No, mum, I haint a been a diggin' eny 
more since yer took 'em frum me." 

"Silus, whar did yer keep ther wurms hid 
frum me? Answer me this minit." 

"I hed 'em in my pocket, Sallie." 

Francis If. Townsknd. 



Last year the people of the Tnited States 
used about 71,000,000 pounds of tea, which 
cost $10,000,000. The Secretary of Agricul- 
ture favors another attempt at raising this 
commodity in this country. Several efforts 
have been made to grow tea in the Southern 
states, but the only thing that has been dem- 
onstrated is that it costs about ten times aa 
much to grow it here as it does to purchase it 
abroad It is more profitable for us to raise 
cotton, manufacture it into fabrics and trade 
it for the native teas of China and Japan. 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvwvvvv* 

* DRINK ^ * 

CLEIN ROCK 

J| A Pure Mountain Spring J 

9 Main Office Cowberry's Crystal Water » 
J 216S SpringSt Jj 




LADIES 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

C hernial 

."^Price 50 cts 

Noi l li >l :i i ii 81 r«*et 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors Engravers 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa- e mas- Make fll,e halftones, line cuts embossing plates 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair! newspaper cute-just any hing yon i want en- 
Ooods of all kinds. Try Creme DB Acacia 1 graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. | Angeles. 


Beers 

ADL0FF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
I.ager Beers on draught at all prlnciral saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited. Phone 11 4i;8 


Grillework 

JN0. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 


House Cleaning 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, 81. 50 day 
25c per hour. 868 8. Broadway. Oeo. Tanabi 


Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought oiit Chafin d Fahricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet and Sptciiil Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 


Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

Arc made at Plaza Photo (iallery at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
penses and can give you your money's worth. 
Plaza Gallery, 513 N. Main. 


Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115)4 N. Main St., Los AKOBIJH 


Real Estate 

" Mayne MimIm 1 li »■ bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading KMl KotaU- Agent* 

118 West Fourth St. - - Los A nobles 


Carriage Works 

A. 1. LIKE 

Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc.. made to order. 800-802 J . Spring 
and 801-803 8. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 


Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS. Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-813 New Hioit St. - Los An<;ei.es 


Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAK. CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 641 8outh Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Robt. Jordan 


Veterinary Surgeon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. proprietor 
Chicago Veterinarv Hospital, «27 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1152. White 2131. 


Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give sprcial attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Third St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 


Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon, specialist for women 
Office hours : 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

40% S. Spring St. - • UmAMIUI 



Wood-Carpet 

JN0. A. SMITH 

♦1 25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old bouses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway'. 



Wines 

TRY OUR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. FREK DELIVERY 
Southern California Wine Co. 220 West 
4th ot., Los Angeles. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions ana ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4^, 5c a roll 

Gilts 7#c " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2C a ft. 

Window Shades 25c each 

WAITER BROS 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



Oldest and Largest Hank in Southern 
Cal ifornia 



WO U, Ulfll/IIUUlO l)( 
OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 



Total 11,426,742 



OFFICERS 

I. W. HE M.MAN President 

H. W. HELI.M AN Vice-President 

H. J FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

Q. HEIMANN Assistant Cashlci 

DIRECTORS 

W.H.Perry C. E. Thorn A.Glassell 

O. W. Chllds L W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 




Main Street Savings Bank 

hmctlon of Main, Siirlng and Temple Hts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL HTOCK SIBSCKIHEP $200,000 

AI'ITAL HTOCK PAID OP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 




' T. L. DUQUE _ President 

! I. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-Presldent 

1 B. V. DUQL'E Cashier 

Imkkttorh— H. W. Hellman. Kasper Cohn, II. 
I W. O'Melveny, J. B. I-anlcershlm, <>. T. Johnson, 

T. L. Duiiuc, L N. Van Nuys, W. <1. KerckhofT, A. 

Haas 

Park Market 

CHAM. K KSTNKK, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

T«le|>hone Kml V21 



14 



Western Graphic 




Observations of the Owl 



HOW many have been one of a group the 
evenings of this week, swapping rem- 
iniscences, working out family resemblances, 
digging up "baby pictures," exhibiting heir- 
loom trifles, urging others to come out here 
and settle, and otherwise deporting themselves 
as is natural when entertaining friends and 
relatives who were left behind years ago! 
There are some curious flashes of latent 
phases of human nature brought to the sur- 
face during this wholesale invasion of east- 
erners. There is a pretty nice home near 
Westlake that taxes the ingenuity of the mas- 
ter and mistress severely keeping up appear- 
ances on an eighty-a-month income. And on 
Monday in swoops an even half dozen of 
Iowa aunt^ an 1 cousins who had siezed the 
opportunity of their lives to see California. 
Si far, so good, for a little extra "skimping" 
had made resources available for their proper 
entertainment, and the week's visit had been 
anticipated quite pleasurably But my lord 
of the ranch in his exuberance of hospitality 
expressed the wish (which is always a good 
bluff) that they could stay a month, at which 
the cousins and aunts as sincerely expressed 
their regrets that they had round trip tickets. 
The next day at lunch, in a perfect gale of 
delight, aunt Jermima announced that she 
and cousin Delia and aunt Meg had success- 
fully interviewed a ticket scalper and would 
stay until just before the fall term of school 
opens back eist. The poor man is now nego- 
tiating a ninety day loan and is as downcast 
as a twice discovered offender. 



The demulcent climax of the police de- 
partment imbroglio was a sore disappoint- 
ment to the cabal that has long hoped 
for the dethronement of the big chief of 
police, who will not yet awhile remove his 
generous physical and official personality in 
order to create an ample vacancy for some 
one of the numerous aspirants to attempt to 
fill. The reprimand that was administered 
perfunctorily, and received with no very 
marked evidence of contrition, did not carry 
with it a conviction that the police commis- 
sioners themselves are so far imbued with an 
idea of their own infallibility as to be beyond 
condoning an unfortunate and ill-timed dis- 
play of temper on the part of the chief, whom 
they choose to consider a subordinate officer. 
One of the few illustrations that the chief ad- 
mits the subordination of his office to the 
authority of the commissioners was given 
when he consented, at the board's request, to 
stand while the written reprimand was read 
to him. What adds an element of humor to 
the broil of the department is the faith that 
some persons, not thoroughly po.-ted, had in 
the power of the police commissioners to re- 
move or severely discipline Chief of Police 
Glass without the consent of the City Council. 



"Your honor must be a mind reader," re- 
plied the lawyer. "I did not know that I had 
expressed my feelings." 



While Colonel John R. Berry has been 
offering a whole regiment of Southern Califor- 
nia volunteers to the President with poor 
chance of acceptancy, the lieutenant colonel 
of the Seventh Regiment, N. G. C, has made 
a proposition involving a less numerous and 
yet an important factor calculated in sup- 
pressing the troublesome Filipinos. Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Schrieber made application for a 
commission as a field officer of United States 
Volunteers. Unlike some other persons with 
Btronger pulls he did not get what he wanted 
but received the appointment of a cap- 
tain. From lieutenant colonel on horseback 
to captain on foot is not a promotion when 
only the sound of the titles is considered, but 
to some persons, including Colonel Schriebe 
an empty title is outweighed by an opportun- 
ity to accomplish something for one's self and 
for one's own country. As one way of mak- 
ing amends for the shabby treatment of the 
Seventh Regiment, which, on its way to the 
Spanish War was side-tracked at San Fran- 
cisco, it would be eminently proper to commis- 
sion such of that organization's officers as 
may yet wish to go to the front. 

The story that Colonel Berry and Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Schrieber have been, figuratively 
speaking, at swords' points fcr some time 
seems to be disproved by the magnanimous 
endorsement the Colonel gives to the appoint- 
ment of the officer next in command in the 
State Guard, and the expressing of a belief 
that Schrieber deserved no less than a major's 
commission. 



When the Times' Biren whistle blew so 
long and loud Tuesday afternoon a great 
many people in this city thought it was the 
announcement that Brigadier General H. G. 
Otis had been made Secretary of War. Not 
until they learned that all the whistles and 
bells had been turned loose in honor of the 
N.E.A. were those deluded people undeceived. 



The great facility with which Los Angeles 
has stowed away and lodged, without crowd- 
ing, the 10,000 N. E. A. visitors that were 
promised has shown that this city can easily 
handle conventions two or three times as 
large. Though a great convention hall should 
be provided for future gatherings in this city 
there is no urgent need of more hotels and 
lodging houses, not even to house a crowd 
four times as great as the one attracted by 
the N.E.A. convention and the cheap railroad 
rates. 



I am reminded of this incident: 
''Sir," said the judge on the bench, ad- 
dressing the lawyer; "I fine you $20 for con- 
tempt of court!" 



Few people not in touch with current 
events have any idea of the progress that is 
being made toward perfecting a general cam- 
paign against the saloon interests in this city 
— a campaign that is ostensibly intended to 
compel the enforcement of the ordinances as 



they exist, but which is expected to result in 
making this a prohibition city. Though pri- 
vate opinions may be divided on the subject 
of the propriety of enforcing prohibition in 
a city of this size and cosmopolitan charac- 
ter there is not the slightest doubt that the 
church party can accomplish what it desires 
when once it shall set about it. Time alone 
will show how true are the misgivings of those 
that choose to think that the enforcement of 
prohibition will result in dullness unbear- 
able. 



A PECULiARcircumstance that hovers around 
the city hall like an electric cloud is that 
though the city council arose on its collective 
dignity and called down the city engineer for 
changing the Third street tunnel specifica- 
tions so as to permit the use of Colton cement 
in place of the imported and more expen- 
sive, the change was made and it sticks 
— whether the cement does or does not. There 
is a mystery over the true reason for chang- 
ing the specifications for the advantage of the 
contractor, and none seem to be inclined to 
cast any light upon the subject. 



An expectant public awaits with anxiety 
the outcome of the pending disagreement be- 
tween City Assessor Ben E. Ward and those 
banks that object to paying taxes upen the 
amounts assessed to them by the city officer. 
The poor widow who paid her taxes on the 
sewing machine with which she ekes out an 
existence and the laborer who was assessed 
for his tools and those other unfortunates 
who have nothing but their heads to pay tax 
upon, are watching the outcome of this at- 
tempt to get what is due from those that are ■ 
possessed of much. 



"Education in California," by ex-State 
Superintendent of Schools L G. Hoitt, is the 
leading article in May "Sunset." Written by 
an authority and handsomely i.lustrated 
with halftone engravings of California educa- 
tional institutions, it is of special value to all 
interested in California's school facilities. 
Every teacher should have a copy. The Mis- 
sion series of articles is continued, and Prof. 
J. N. LeConte contributes a valuable and well 
illustrated article on Kings River Canyon, 
before long to be one of California's great re- 
sorts. There are several other interesting 
features in the number, which, five cents for- 
warded to box 2328, San Francisco, will se- 
ure. 



A scientific young man may take his 
best girl out automobile riding, but the 
romance of the buggy ride is gone. In the 
automobile carriage the young man's two 
hands and arms are kept busy managing the 
machine. The moonlights are the same; but 
conditions are not as they were when a nice 
young man could drive his horse with one 
arm and hug his best girl with the other. The 
good old days are going away. 

WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 

1ST. E. A. 

N ICE 

"p^ ASTERN To be had for Men or Boy? 
/\ TT1RE -«»*Jat THK@««» 

ON DON CLOTHING CO. 

I 19 to 125 N. Spring St. 

HARRIS & PRANK, Props. 



Western Graphic 



15 




" 

Amusements 




THEATER-GOERS who read San Fran- 
cisco papers must have had feelings of 
regret that Los Angeles did not have the first 
chance to see T. Daniel Frawley's new com- 
pany, which opened this week at the Califor- 
nia with some new plays, a lot of new, pretty 
and popular women with a corresponding lot 
of new and beautiful costumes. Then there 
are many who "went to see the Frawleys at 
the Burbank once out of curiosity " who would 
now do homage to Blanche Bates, who re- 
turns with fame for beauty as well as an ac- 
tress of talent and triumphs. But we shall 
no doubt see the company ere long in "The 
Dancing Girl," "London Assurance," "Madam 
Sans Gene" and other plays. 

ALWAYS fascinating are the stage stories 
of the south with their delineation of a 
southern girl's idyllic love, an old Virginian's 
chivalry and honor, the ever-present hot- 
headed southern scalawag, and the indis- 
pensible old negro. ''The New Dominion" is 
one of the prettiest of comedies, fresh and 
crisp with wit that lingers pleasantly. Clay 
Clement sustains the part of Baron Hohen- 
stauffen with artistic fidelity, and as a beauti- 
ful southern woman Mrs. Clement is a picture 
of queenly grace. 

AS IF in recognition of the N.E.A. visitors 
the Orpheum bill this week is one of 
unusual excellence, and from the Phoites, who 
tickle the children, to the Biograph, which 
fascinates everyone, it is a show that deserves 
the big houses that have been the rule. I 
often wonder if people slop to think what a 
wonderful machine is the biograph. This 
week it takes us on a walk around the ruins 
of the Windsor Hotel in New York and a few 
minutes later we stand on a float in Belfast 
harbor, Ireland, and witness the launching of 
the Oceanic, the largest steamer now afloat; 
then another short interval of darkness and 
the audience takes a seat on the fender of a 
Brooklyn bridge cable car and is whirled 
across East river with so much realism that 
it inclines one strongly toward gripping the 
arms of the chair. 

What a refreshing glimpse into the New 
Hampshire hills is the little one-act comedy, 
"Grasping an Opportunity," so artistically 
played by Will M. Cressy and Blanche 
Dayne, both of "Old Homestead" fame. It 
is a delightful blending of pathos and bathos, 
and along with the laughter at the situation 
there is a glistening of the eye to see the old 
New Englander being skinned down to the 
patch in his money sock. With an excep- 
tionally fine stage setting it is undoubtedly 
the finest bit that has been dished up in vau- 
deville for a long time. 

Janet Mulville and Evie Stetson "make 
good" with their dialect "Jack and Jill," but 
have fallen into the error of making jokes 
on Miss Stetson's embonpoint that are not 
only old but on the wrong side of the foot- 
lights. 

The Four O'Learys have hit upon a pleas- 
ing diversity in their Turkish costumes and 
two of the troupe do some brilliant tumbling. 

THE interest shown by the visitors for 
the forthcoming Chinese theater ex- 
ceeds the liberal expectations of the entertain- 



ment committee. Since the work of distribut- 
ing the tickets began last Tuesday af:ernoon, 
room 5 of the Chamber of Commerce has been 
crowded throughout each day by applicants 
for the precious papers that give them the 
right to see a section of the celestial king- 
dom's Thespian life. 

One unusual feature will be the presence 
of a Chinese actress, one of the two in this 
country. She is a woman who has been 
trained to her work from childhood, and when 
she had acquired the degree of proficiency to 
rank as a star she was bought by a man who 
recognized her ability for the sum of four 
thousand five hundred dollars and was brought 
to this country. When it is considered that 
the Chinese women are usually valued at 
from five to twenty-five dollars her histrionic 
ability may easily be estimated. 

Arrangements were definitely completed 
for the introduction of a bazaar and tea gar- 
den to be given during each matinee and 
night performance Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday. Guests at each performance are 
privileged to view the products of the Chinese 
on exhibition and to partake of the golden 
beverage brewed by the natives of the Celes- 
tial land. 



Los Angeles Theater Probably the moat gifted 
author on the coast on the history of the ancient As- 
syrians, Babylonians and Egyptians is Dr.Vooraany;er 
of the Temple Emanu El in San Francisco. He is 
considered among the authors and writiers as one of 
the strongest authorities on the Semetic language and 
literature in the United States. It has been several 
years since Dr. Voorsanger appeared before the pub- 
lic of Los Angeles; at that time he gave a series of 
lectures for the benefit of the Associated charities of 
this city. It is very gratifying to the Los Angeles 
public as well as to the friends and admire s of this 
well known divine to announce that on Monday even- 
ing, July 1 7th, at the Los Angeles Theater, Dr. 
Voorsanger will deliver his celebrated lecture entitled 
"A Night with the Ancient Assyrians, Babylonians 
and Egyptians." For the past several years Dr. 
Voorsanger has been importuned by Lis legion of 
friends and admirers to make a tour of the coast and 
deliver this lecture which is conceded by intelligent 
and literary people to be a most remarkable one in 
its construction and the manner in which it is illus- 
trated. 



Orpheum It is with a face wreathed in smiles 
that Manager Myers assures all comers that "business 
was never better" with the Orpheum. The house 
has hardly been able to hold the'erowds of the pres- 
ent week and "standing room only" has been the cry 
at every performance of the week. 

Four new acts, of the same clean, bright character 
so noticeable in this week's program, are promised to 
be added to the bill next week. There will be four acts 
held over, among these being the popular biograph 
with new views. 

The Throe Gardner Bros., expert musicians and 
comedians, whose work is said to bo Bimilar to Water- 
bury Bros, and Tenny, head the bill. Others are tho 
Farrells (Willie and Hi 1 1 if i, champion cake walkers of 
the world; Morie, a famouB juggler; Mae Creasy, a 
sweet contralto singer; Melville and Stetaon, charac- 
ter iinperponators; Cressy and Dayne in their great 
New Hampshire sketch, "Grasping An Opportunity;" 
and the Four O'Learys, cleverest of comedy acrohata. 

■ 3" 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FU8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vitndevillo 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July i7. 

:< Qndow Brothe ■■ comedy Musical Artist". 

i in' i .hi. ii -, Champion take Walkers of the World. 

Morie, the 'tourist Manipulator of Ohjecli; a positive novelty. 

Mae Creasy, the Phenomenal Contralto 

Will M. t'n-ssy fc.ii<l ) Eastern Comedy Stsra, in "Grasping 

Itlunehe lliiv e j I D Opportunity." 

Ji.net Melville and • Ear Famed ( harader Vocalists and 

tCvle Mteteon ) Dialect Impersonators. 

The Kotir O' Lean '«. Kurope's Comedy Eccentrics. 
Great AmaritH illiigiHph, this Week in New Views 




T OS ANGELES THEATER 

. < r M. WOOD .» , 

■ ■ [ H. U. WYATT/ 

ONE NIGHT ONLY— MONDAY EVENING, JILY 17th 
The FlBOU lit tine 

Will Dative* His Celebrated Lecture 

A NIQHT WITH THE 
ANCIENT dS/YRMNA Bd&TLQNIdNS 
AHfo EGYPTIAN/ 

ILLUSTRATED WITH HXAt'TIFL'l. 3TEREOITICON Vlt«., 1 tkl s l 
THR MOMKENTS IN TIIK IlRiri-M Ml sKt M 

Peats r.ow on sale. PR ICEH — SSC and 50c. Tel. Main 70 

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

PHYSICIANS AND SI'KGKONS 



ELIZABETH A. FOLLANSBEE 

315 SO. BROADWAY 
Rooms : 332-331 Laughlln Building 
JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN, 
Hours: 9 a.m. to 19 m., 1 to ( p.m. 

H S. ORME 

416-417 DOUGLAS BLDQ 
Third and Spring Streets 



Office hours 8 to 9 a m 
1 to 4 p in 

Tel. Main 737 
Tel. Main 9«. 



Tola (Office Main fiso 
lel8 - (Res. Main .100 

RESIDENCE 
215 N. BUNKER 1111. 1. 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

328 330 WILCOX BUILDING 
Tel. Main (114 



Hours— 10-12 a m. 
2-4 p.m. 

Residence: THE LOCKE 



DENTISTS 



D. CAVE 

LAN KERSEIM BLOCK 
126 WeBt Third street 



Tel. Main 1611 



Tailoring- and Repairing 

Suite made to order, gooda the very beat, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

H. L. Yekoer, 118 West Second Street. 



$ mount Eowe Railway 

A Magnificent Panorama of Earth and Ocean 

f Grandest Trip on Earth 

f ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

J SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain. 

\ V 3500 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 

f panoramic view ol Southern California— a high 

. class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartmciits 

# with or without baths ( uisine unexcelled 

\ Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

f SPECIAL 

A Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 

V lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fa'e 

A to Echo Mountain and return and n 60c round trip 

v rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 

A desired. 

\ Tickets and full Informallon 

J CLARENCE A. WARNER 

m Traffic and Bxeuralon Agent 

A 2J4 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 

\ Tel. Main 960 



PRICKS never changing— 25c and .Vc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, .Saturday and Sunday: 25c to any part of the 
bouse; Gallery 10c: Children 10c any neat. 



NOT1CK OF FOKKCLOSUKK SAIiK 

Sheriffs Hale, No. 32146. 

J. M. Elliott and H. T. lee, as Trustees for 
Jessie P. Church, plaintitis, vs. Minnie s. Serrot, 
the said Minnie Serrot and J. W. Gillette and W. 
W. Wldney. a»Kx colors of the Will of < harles 
E. Serrot. deceased, Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale- 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 13th day of July. 
A. I)., 1899, in the aliove entitled aeilon, where 
in J. M. Elliott, et al., the above named 
plaintiffs, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie S. Serrol. 
et al., defendants, on (he 27th day of June, 
A.D. 1H99, for the sum of Seventeen Hundred 
and Fourteen and 10-100 Hollars, gold coin of the 
United States, which said decree was, on the 
30th day of June, A. D 1899, recorded 
in Judgment Hook 85 of said Court, 
at page 4, I am commanded to sell all that 
certain lot. piece, or parcel of land lltuate, 
lying and being in the countv of I,os Angeles, 
state of California, and hounded and de-crihed 
as follows: Lot Thirteen (131 of Hodgkin s -ul. 
division of Lot Kighn-s veil (W) and Elghtv- 
eight iHKi of Watt s Subdivision of part of the 
Rancho San Rafael, according to the map of 
said Hodgkln's Subdivision, recorded in Hook 
5, page 57(1 of the Miscellaneous Records of Los 
■ Angeles Countv, California. Together with Ten 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamore 
Canyon Water Cnmnanv of San Rafael, Los 
Angeles Countv, California. 

Together with all and singular the tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, or In anywlsv appertaining. 

Public notice Is herein- given lhat on Tccsday, 
the 8th day of August, A. D. 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M of lhat day, In front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance. 
I will. In obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above dc 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said Judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc., to the highest and bell bidder, 
for casn, gold coin of the I' S. 

Dated this I3th day of July, 1890. 

W. A. HAMMEL. 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

By STEPHEN AI.DF.N Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Lee & Scott, Plaintiff s Attorneys. 




NEW SUSPENSION BRIDGE AT NIAGARA. 
The new suspension bridge at Niagara occupies the site upon which stood the 
bridge built in 1850-51. In the construction of the new bridge parts of the old bridge 
that stood far up the stream, close to the American fall, were used. These two facts 
add to the interest that attaches to any bridge across Niagara. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 





"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 





Many oi 

your TowiMomen 



Are customers of ours and the satisfaction we 
have given in quality, style and the very low 
price causes them to continue their orders. 

We make Suits, Spring and Summer, Skirts, 
Bicycle Suits, Golf Suits — everything in Suits 
and Cloaks. 

Send by Express prepaid 

Catalogue and Samples 

Free by mail for the asking 

The National 

ClOak COmpany 



119=121 West 23d Street 
New York City 



Gardening fa 
California * * 




W. S. LYON 



FREE 



For a limited time we will give 
one of these books with each 
new or renewed annual sub- 
scription to Western 
Graphic 
$2.00 a year 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
Shippers in Southern 
California 

Written for this Soif and Climate 
Xlicefy Tffustrated 
&very lover of tffoWers sfwutd fiave a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) ^..T 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 




F)RI INTERS 
UBLISHERS 



AND 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for us to 
handle to your entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 

Tel, M. 1053 LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



o<3 srccKSSOK to p>o 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



701 South Main Street 



E,lectrical Repairing 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

an<i Switchboard 

Appara tus 

First=Class Machine Work 



JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo. Rice & 80ns (Inc..) 311 31 co U-w Hieh Street 



Western Graphic 



Ci.PVRIOHTKU |8BS 



Vin ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 
fOI? SWTHCRN CALIFORNIA. 



Volume VII. 
Number 4 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 22, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 




Maus-ird-Colllcr Eng. Co. 



ONE OF THE CHARMING PLEASURE CRAFTS AT TERMINAL 

Yacht "Alert" properly of Mr. W. Waterhoust- of Pasadena 



Photo ky Pierce 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

f TERMINAL ISLAND EDITION H 



Western Graphic 



McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 




Royal Arms Stationery 

VERY excellent values that will appeal to 
every lover of fine stationery. It is hardly 
necessary for us to here emphasize the quality of 
Hurlbut's tine papers; you all know what they are. 
The prices should crowd the stationery counter. 

Hurlbut's Royal Arms Paper, with Envelopes to match, put up in nice 
boxes ; colors arc heliotrope and delft blue; the small size, plain, is 35c a 
box; the medium and large size, plain, is 4oc a box. 

Hurlbut's fine Papers in box, with Envelopes to match paper; paper has 
a white border all around, colors are Prench grey, heliotrope, delft blue ; 
the small size, plain, is 45c a box, and the medium and large size, plain, 
50c a box. 

Royal Society, in cream only, linen and satin wove, ruled and plain 
instead of 35c a box, now at 20c. 

Hearts of Oak, in colors of rose, blue, heliotrope and cream ; instead of 
25c a box, at 15c. 

Linen and Satin Wove, nice quality, ruled and plain; one pound of 
paper with 250 envelopes to match, which usually sell for $ 1.00, now at 50c. 

California Blankets — just the thing for campers and seaside cottagers, 
$2.95 a pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 



317-325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth ► 





pear, 
feet 



PROFESSOR LAXGLEY'S WAR AEiiOIHtOME. 
Profeasm • !S. P. Langlsr'a perfected war aerodrome resembles a great hird in ap- 
•ance. It is built largely of aluminum, and the body or car is about 1!."> feet long, >i 
and 8 feet high. It is operated by a liquid air engine of 20 horse power iiud 



huuved bv Co aid Baa. Professor Laugley's aerodrome was built iu Washington. 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 



A 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH ! 



ROUND TRIP 

50c 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



Q los/tnge/es 





J- j* Good Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



J> «* Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9.35 p.m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



4 



212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses in Book-keeping, Shorthand. Typewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

♦ A* OUlphur OpringS and Baths 



1»)> Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. » 
These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of jg 
Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. $> 

A. PUISSEGUK, Proprietor MRS. L. LAPJEUX, Manageress 1 

S)$S$S&&&£3$&S$$si NOTICK OF FOKECbOSUHE SALE 



ROSE PURITY WATER 



. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER fr. m Highland Glen. California The 
analysis of ROBE PURITY WATER shows it to contain the most htalthful jiroiertcs known f. r 
Coustiuation, Indigestion and Kidney difficulties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use. It is nicely furnished in one and five-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all points of the 
city and towns through our agents. It is cool and clear as crystal as it runs from the Spring Kock 
Fountain head. It is not a dead water; its virtue for h alth is Spirit, Life and Purity. 

If any person not know ing or using this water will visit us within 30 days, will be entitled 
to the extent of rive gallons FREE, each party bringing his bottle. 

For orders address 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Tel . -miI> Station lO 



LAMB & WHITNEY, 



PASADENA AND 4t»tli A\ I NI ES 



*J^» ..L- nj^ »yl^ . Jy *X« *J» «X« *vL» *sL* *sl* *J^* »sL» 




Joseph Maier, <;eor<;k Zobei.ein & 
Pres atd TTcas. Vice-Pres. and Sec'y $ 

i 

HOME INDUSTRY >J 



KEEP MONEY AT HOME 



Maier & Zobelein 1 
t^REWERY 



IMOKroi: atei) 



444 ALISO STREET \ 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91. 



Sheriffs Sale, No. 3-J146. 

J. M. Klliottand H. T. Lee, as Trustees for 
Jessie P. Church, plaintiffs, vs. Minnie 8. Serrot, 
the said Minnie Serrot and J. W. Gillette and W. 
W. Widney as Ex cutors of the Will of Charles 
E. Serrot, deceased, Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of Bale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 13th day of July, 
A.U., 1899, In the above entitled action, where 
in J. M. Elliott, et al.. the above named 
plaintiffs, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie S. Serrot, 
et al., defendants, on the 27th day of June, 
A.D. 1899, for the sum of Seventeen Hundred 
and Fourteen and 40-100 Dollars, gold coin of the 
I'nitcd states, which said decree was, on the 
80tb day of Juue, A. D 1809, recorded 
In Judgment Hook 85 of said Court, 
at page 4, I am commanded to sell all that 
certain lot. piece, or parcel of land situate, 
lying and being in the county of Los Angeles, 
state of California, and bcuuded and described 



as follows: Lot Thirteen (13) of Hodgkin's Sub- 
division of Lot Eighty-s ven (S7) and Eigbty- 
emht (881 of Watt's Subdivision of part of the 
Runcho San Rafael, according to the map of 
said Hodgkin's Subdivision, recorded in Hook 
5, page . r )7ti of the Miscellaneous Records of I.os 
Angeles County, California. Together with Ten 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamore 
Canyon Water Company of San Rafael, l.os 
Angeles County, California. 

Together with all anil singular the tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, or in anywise appertaining. 

Public notice is herebv giveu that on Tcesday, 
the Sth day of August, A. D. 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M . of that day, in front of the Court House doot 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance. 
I will, in obedience to saki order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc., to the highest and best bidder, 
for casn, gold coin of the U. S. 

Dated this 13th day of Julv, 1899. 

W. A. HAMMEL, 
Sberiffof Los Angeles County 

By STEPHEN ALDEN Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Lee & Scott, Plaintiff's Attorneys. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 4 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 22, 1899. 



Edition de l.uic 
lo Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc. 



BKN. C. TRUMAN 



KDITOR 



AUTOMOBILE is the talismanic word 
that means much more in the transpor- 
tation world than we are at first inclined to 
give it. The experimental stage in this com- 
paratively new method of locomotion has 
been passed and its practicability conclusively 
demonstrated. A few years ago there were 
not a score of self propelling carriages in the 
world. One year ago there were not more 
than two dozen in the United States, while 
today there are nearly one hundred manufac- 
turing concerns with an aggregate capital of 
$338,000,000 engaged in building carriages, 
omnibusses, tallihos, delivery wagons, trucks, 
tricycles and other vehicles of utility. Even 
with this enormous capital invested the de- 
mand for the various vehicles cannot be met, 
notwithstanding that many of the concerns 
are working day and night. The means of 
power is not confined alone to electricity, 
stram, compressed air and gasoline, but other 
methods of propulsion are being used. 

The best modern automobile vehicle must 
be practically noiseless, odorless, free from 
vibration and absolutely safe — and these 
points are claimed by nearly all the manufac- 
turers. The prices seem high but it is as- 
serted that within a very short time an ordi- 
nary runabout or buggy can be had at a most 
reasonable figure. The cost of maintenance 
is claimed to be much lower than that for a 
team of horses. For an electric wagon com- 
plete, costing $2250, as compared with a 
wagon $375, team $250, and harness $75, total 
$700, the interest at 5 percent on each, the 
cost of electricity, horses maintenance, the 
actual expense for the year is $412.50 for the 
electric as against $525 for the horse outfit. 
This is where the power is bought at current 
rates, but if the current is generated in a pri- 
vate plant the cost of electricity will be re- 
duced to the minimum sum of $22 a year. 

The cost of operating a gasoline motor 
vehicle is placed at one cent per mile, and it 
has many advantages over other machines, 
though they require more care and attention, 
have more or less vibration and give off 
odor. Compressed air motors have as yet not 
reached the perfection of either electricity or 
gasoline. 

An eminent attorney, Mr. A. B. Hotch- 
kies, is authority for the statement that "the 
ordinance of intention to acquire possession 
of improvements, section 1, coupled with the 
intention to construct a new system as set out 
in section 2 of the ponderous ordinance, No. 
5856, are void under section 223 of the city 
charter. 

"This section limits the right to increase 
the indebtedness of the city to over $2,000,000 



as follows: Provided that for the purpose of 
acquiring or establishing a system of water 
works, (not both acquiring and establishing), 
for supplying the inhabitants of the city with 
water or of establishing and constructing a 
system for the collection and disposition of 
the sewage of the city a further indebtedness 
may be incurred by the issue of bonds for that 
purpose under the provisions of the constitu- 
tion and general laws. 

"The city is conceded to own a system but 
i8 out of possession, owing to an alleged lien; 
the charter does not allow bonds to pay debts 
accrued in previous years, that would not be 
under the provisions of the constitution and 
general laws as we have shown. 

"The language of the charter limits on in- 
debtedness by bonds to sewage matters by the 
issue of bonds for that purpose, if it had in- 
tended to cover water bonds it would have 
said for THOSE purposes. 

"The mode prescribed by the charter is 
the measure of power of the city to act." 



The probable result of the entertainment 
of some fourteen thousand eastern visitors 
for the past two weeks is a pleasant subject to 
ruminate upon. The veriest pessimist could 
not have wished for a more delightful fort- 
night climatically and the wisdom of careful 
and thorough preparation was exemplified in 
the expedition and comfort with which the 
crowds were taken care of. There were some 
mistakes and oversights as would be inevita- 
ble in the preliminaries of even a Sunday 
school picnic; but there is no pardon for the 
persons responsible for the "sample orange 
orchard," for it is only those fortunate ones 
indulging in side trips through the orange 
centers, who will be able to efface from their 
minds the memory of that hot and dusty 
"treat" to scarce and smutty oranges. 

But all and all California hospitality has 
won many thousand friends in a few days 
and for the next twelve months at least "a 
trip to California" will be the topic of a story 
to several hundred thousand willing listeners. 

Insulting questions to degrade witnesses, 
where it is manifest that the examination is 
not for the purpose of proving immorality but 
to prejudice the jury and humiliate the wit- 
ness is considered by the State Supreme Court 
as an error sufficient to reverse the case in 
this county of Frank 1). Crandall, convicted 
of murder. The trial will have to be gone 
through with again at a great cost to the 
county. It i9 not a reversal of the facts that 
convicted, but a technicality that may give the 
prisoner the much desired time, in which the 
material witnesses can not be found or have 
died, and thus secure the final acquittal of the 
murderer. "The error of the court in per- 
mitting such a course to be pursued," says 
the Supreme Court, "is sufficient grounds for 
the reversal." 

It has become a notorious fact that a few 
attorneys at the bar of this county make it 
their special practice to grossly insult the wit- 
nesses as well as the court in any and all 
cases in which they appear. It seems that 
their couise is followed to secure notoriety and 
advertisement, such as it is. When will 



courts sit down on these methods and put the 
precocious pettifoggers in the county jail for 
contempt, or entirely disbar them? 

It was a spectacle for gods and men to see 
and listen to R. A. Bird on the stand in his 
own behalf this week during his trial for forg- 
ery. The bar-room wit he was allowed to 
indulge in was a peculiar exhibition by a man 
whose liberty was in jeopardy. His childlike 
attempt at nonchalance by forcing a yawn at 
short intervals during attorneys' arguments 
served but to expose his self-consciousness. 
But of all the displays of venomous vindic- 
tiveness within the knowledge of the writer, 
the attempt of Bird, by innuendo and direct 
statements, to besmirch the name of the man 
who took him up when the prison doors had 
spat him out was the most cold-blooded and 
ungrateful. 

A number of pages of this enlarged issue 
of Westkhn Graphic are devoted to an illus- 
trated description of Terminal Island and its 
advantages as a coast resort. It is truly a 
marvel of growth, and like many places of 
similar life the surprise is that a location of 
such merit should have for so long remained 
unexploited. The transformation of this bar- 
ren sand spit into a veritable Brighton Beach 
is but one of hundreds of like opportunities 
in Southern California awaiting enterprise 
and capital to repeat in degree the success of 
Terminal-by- the-Sea. 

What a perfect delight it will be after 
August first to write "ex-Secretary Alger" 
when referring to the disgraced embalmed 
beef and harbor obstructionist member of the 
cabinet. 



The majority of the daily press of the 1 
United States is now writhing under the al- 
leged censorship at the Philippines, and in 
columns of valuable editorial space is belab- 
oring Maj. Gen. Otis for incomplency, gross 
negligence and any other military crimes that 
the respective editorial writers can think of. 
It does not seem that the abuse avails much 
for the yellow journalists, which adds corres- 
pondingly to their frenzy of wrath, already at 
the foaming stage as a result of the war cor- 
respondents' "round-robin." If it were not 
for the vicioueiiflss of many of the papers 
abusing the head of the Luzon campaign, the 
howl against the censor at the cable station 
would be p>sitively humorous. It suggests 
most strongly the situation of a lot of 
bad boys who had abused a privilege with the 
resulting punishment by being kept in tin- 
house. Free speech and a free press are two 
magnificent stones in the foundation of our 
country, but they are ao often abused that 
more is the pity martial law could not oftener 
be exercised in the tempering of the methods 
of those newspapers that would wreck a man, 
a business or a community for self advertise- 
ment. 



How many of our citizens stop to think 
that this issue of the Graphic (20 pp.) is as 
large as was Harper's Weekly a few yearB 
ago? Some of our Eastern exchanges size up 
Los Angeles as a great town to support such a 
paper as we are issuing. We wish your ap- 
preciation as well as your subscription. 



4 



Western Graphic 




Observations of the Owl 



THE manifold troubles that heretofore 
have beset the paths of the councilmen 
will dwindle into comparative insignificance 
beside the tribulations that are yet in store 
for those statesmen who have just entered 
upon the most dangerous stage of their career 
by meeting as a board of equalization. Now, 
everybody knows that the duties of a board 
of equalization should be to equalize. That 
is, the board should increase the tax assess- 
ments of those persons that escaped too easily 
and to prune down those valuations that may 
be shown to be extravagant. Boards of equali- 
zation do not often increase the valuations 
but they have been known to help out very 
wealthy people occasionally by lopping off 
figures, with resulting economy to the object- 
ing taxpayer. It is confidently asserted that 
some heavy taxpayers who should by rights 
pay even more will strive most strenuously to 
save money through the kind offices of the 
equalization councilmen. To withstand the 
influences that will be brought to bear, and to 
support the efforts of the city assessor will 
require in the councilmen a degree of firmness 
that may and may not fail to materialize. 

If readers of the daily newspaper reports 
of a criminal trial that is now going through 
a second hearing in one department of the 
superior court sometimes confuse the prosecut- 
ing witness with the defendant at bar it is 
little wonder. If the same readers shall one 
day make up their minds that it is really the 
prosecuting witness who is on trial for giving 
park land to the city or for being out late with 
club friends or something of that kind, it will 
not be surprising, in view of the fact that the 
original object of the trial is frequently lost 
sight of in the court room hilarity that fol- 
lows a sally of wit from the defendant. Now, 
if a former trusted employe is being tried fDr 
the alleged forgery of his employer's name to 
checks that were readily cashed at bank it is 
one thing; if the employer is on trial for an 
excess of confidence or for liberality of liba- 
tions it is quite another. An amended com- 
plaint should forthwith be drawn to make 
plain who is the defendant. 



Abbot Kinney is in his element this week. 
He is associating with men that can justly 
appreciate his rare attainments in knowledge 
of not only eucalypti, but other trees. In the 
American Forestry Association that met here 
this week are men of national reputation who 
have, like Mr. Kinney, devoted many years of 
intelligent study to the subject of forestry, 
which in this western country is one closely 
connected with the vital problem of irriga- 
tion and reclamation of arid lands. To prop- 
erly appreciate what forestry really means one 
should look out on this beautiful Southern 
California and realize that, practically every 
tree in sight, excepting those upon the moun- 
tains and the rare clumps of live oaks in the 
valleys, was set out by human hands, and 
nearly all of them in the present generation 
of man. The unthinking public does not 



realize that but for the law of compensation 
observed by man in planting trees in the val- 
leys while denuding the mountains of their 
noble pines and cedars this would be a barren 
waste, unlovely. To save the trees upon the 
mountain slopes and thereby prevent the 
gradual destruction of the country's water 
supply, is one great object of the Forestry 
Association, whose motto should be a para- 
phrase of the old specification of good citizen- 
ship — "Rear a child or plant a tree." 



One fact that has during the past few days 
been made evident with crushing force is that 
in all future wars the newspaper power must 
be considered in the estimation of a belliger- 
ant potency. It may be a good plan, as sug- 
gested by an army officer in Washington, to 
shoot all newspaper correspondents that dare 
to disagree with the existing military powers, 
but such salutary measures^are not practical. 
Not that newspaper correspondents are any 
better than Filipinos, but the people who in 
this free country are not dominated by mar- 
tial power, would not stand it. Besides it is 
evident that the great American people really 
relish the truth and will hail with delight the 
day when readers here may actually know 
what is going on elsewhere. If the Island of 
Luzon is too small for both Major General 
E. S. Otis and his journalistic critics it is 
plain that either the general or the correspon- 
dents must get out. If the correspondents 
tell the truth, and it is wonderful how many 
persons rely upon their veracity at this mom- 
ent, then the major general should be laid 
away with other ante bellum relics. If theirs 
is a fairy story then, say I, hang every moth- 
er's son of them. I would take my chances 
on hanging with them. 



Army and Navy 

The British war office has decided that 
immediate steps shall be taken to provide an 
extensive swimming bath for the use of the 
troops at Aldershot. It will be erected in a 
central position, and it is hoped to make it 
more or less self-supporting. 

The German emperor has been trying a 
new weapon in the shape of a sort of rille re- 
volver based chiefly on Mr. Maxim's princi- 
ples. It resembles the Mauser revolver in all 
important points, has a length of a foot, and 
the magazine contains ten catridges like the 
Mauser revolver. The pistol fits into a wooden 
frame which, together with the butt end prop- 
er, forms the shoulder rests and gives the re- 
volver the appearance of a magazine rifle. 

The armory at Springfield has been al- 
lowed an extra $400,000 in the appropriation 
bill for next year so that it may be able to 
run at its full capacity. The $350,000 worth 
of machinery for Rock Island allowed in the 
same bill will permit the manufacture of 175 
small arms a day. The following statement 
shows the number of guns and mortars that 
will be completed and emplaced in our sea- 
coast fortificatione when existing appropria- 



tions, not including the amount in this bill, 
have been expended, July 1,1899: mortars 312, 
twelve-inch 80, ten inch 118, eight inch 91, 
six-inch 62, five-inch 32, rapid fire 172; total, 
867. 

The value of the improvements at the mil- 
itary posts in the United States not aban- 
doned is estimated at $22,371,548.47. Of 
this amount $10,938,201.64 has been ex- 
pended on posts constructed since 1885. The 
improvements at each of the following posts 
are worth over $1,000,000, viz.: Fort Sheridan, 
$1,417,071,21; Fort Riley, $1,200,000; Wash- 
ington barracks, $1,000,000; Jefferson bar- 
racks, $1,000,000. The following have cost 
$500,000 or more: Presidio, $800,000; Fort 
Crook, $722,805.01; Fort McPherson, $719,- 
299.43; Fort Thomas, $702,119.08; Jefferson 
barracks, Plattsburg barracks, Fort Brady, 
each $700,000; Fort Logan, $621,942.38; Fort 
Sam Houston, $600,000; Fort Ethan Allen, 
$590,714; Fort Slocum, $500,000; Madison 
barracks, $500,000, 

f-our Old Things 

To prove at what date the first umbrella 
was made is a seemingly hopeless task, but 
we find records of their use among the Greeks 
and Romans, not only as a protection from 
sun or rain but as a distinguishing mark of 
royalty. By the time of Queen Anne's reign 
they had become quite common, simply as a 
protection, but they were all imported until 
about 1802 when the manufacture of them 
vvas begun in England. 

To trace the history of a thimble carries us 
back to 1684 when Nicholas Van Benschoten, 
a young goldsmith, designed and made the 
first one to protect the finger of his lady 
love. 

The needle, as we have it, in various 
shapes and sizes, is the result of inventions 
and improvements covering centuries of time. 
Two and a half centuries ago needles were 
first made in England and today one city em- 
ploys in its needle factories 20,000 people and 
manufactures over 100,000,000 needles every 
year. 

Pins were first made in England in the 
fifteenth century and it was an expert artisan 
who could make 500 in a day as the work was 
all done by hand. In 1824 Lemuel Wellman 
Wright invented — in the United States — the 
first machine for the manufacture of pins. 
Now the number made is almost beyond be- 
lief. ... 

Some people do not like this world, 

They sigh, they are unhappy, and 
Find things, with few exceptions, here 

To have been miserably planned; 
The weather never suits them, they 

Are always raked with sorrow, 
And sigh for things of yesterday, 

Or dread things of tomorrow. 
Some people find this world of ours 

A place of pure, serene delight; 
To them the weeds are fragrant flowers 

And unto them all days are bright; 
They wonder at the gifts that God 

To men is ever giving; 
They seem to live to spread abroad 

The joyousness of living. 
Nay, ihey are not the rich who smile, 

Nor are they always poor who sigh; 
The servant oft is happier than 

The master who in state goes by; 
There's always cheer in plenty here 

For those who care to take it; 
And the world is glad or bright or sad, 

As each one tries to make it. 



Western Graphic 



5 




ASSISTING THE GOVERNMENT 



BY HCKJABOOM 

EARLY this spring the United States de- 
partment of Agriculture, with the aid 
of Senator White, succeeded in placing in my 
hands a number of small packages of various 
kinds of garden seeds. The affair wae con- 
ducted throughout in so delicate and sys- 
tematic a manner that my suspicions were 
not even aroused, and I deliberately prepared, 
with my own hands, a small patch of ground 
in the back yard and actually planted those 
seeds. 

Calmly reviewing the affair now I can see 
how the whole diabolical plot may have been 
concocted in Washington while Senator White 
was there ostensibly attending to his labors 
in the Senate. Every step, down to the very 
time when I was approached by a third part}' 
and induced to lug the seeds home, was evi- 
dently taken with extreme caution. The 
newspapers contained, from day to day, what 
appeared to be genuine accounts of the pro- 
ceedings of Congress, in which Senator White 
was repeatedly alleged to be taking an active 
part, and I had no reason then to believe 
that such was not actually the case. I was 
living a calm, uneventful life and taking only 
a passing interest in the affairs of the nation. 

When I first brought the packages home I 
did not notice that they had printed upon 
them a line requesting me to report to the De- 
partment of Agriculture the results of my 
trial. I recently made this discovery, how- 
ever, and hastened to prepare and submit my 
report, earnestly hoping that the delay had 
not seriously discommoded the department or 
interfered in any way with the conduct of the 
affairs of the government. 

I trust it will not be considered a violation 
of any confidence if I present here a copy of 
my official report, for the benefit of those who 
do not desire to await the slow procedure of 
the government in placing the valuable infor- 
mation before the public. The report is as 
follows: 

Hon. James H. Wilson, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: — Will you kindly accept apol- 
ogies for my unseemly delay in forwarding 
report upon trial of seeds, as per your request? 
At the same time permit me to say that I 
never, in all my life, have oeen a finer lot of 
seeds than those you so kindly sent me. They 
were simply the acme of perfection in seeds. 
When I first opened the packages and looked 
upon the contents I thought they were the 
cutest little garden seeds in all the world. 
They were just too cute for anything. My 
mouth fairly watered, and ad my imagination 
pictured the results I was going to get from 
them I could almost taste it. 

I 8omtimes think that too much imagina- 
tion is a bad thing for a person to have, and 
yet were I lacking in imagination I do not see 
how I ever should have been able to make 
this report. Do you not think that imagina- 
tion is a bad thing sometimes, too? 

Now, as to the methods employed in hand- 
ling the seeds — though first while I think of it 
permit me to say that I noted with satisfac- 
tion the fact that your packages do not give 
pictures, on the labels, of the things that are 
supposed to be grown from the seeds they con- 
tain. That is right. How very discouraging 



to a tiny seed it must be to think that all the 
time it is lying in the ground, and when it is 
sprouting in the warm, moist earth, and when 
it springs up into the glad sunlight in the 
shape of a tender little vine or plant, it is liv- 
ing a deliberate lie. What sadness the seed 
must feel to think that it can never hope to 
resemble, in any way, its advance picture. 
The tiny seed must feel something like an 
actress does when she tries to look like her 
pictures in the magazines. But pardon this 
digression. 

Your directions for the culture of the seeds 
proved most valuable. For instance, instead 
of planting the Yellow Strasburg onions in 
trenches two feet or so deep, and covering 
them up with ashes, as my first intention was, 
and wailing several years, perhaps, for them 
to come up, I sowed them in drills, one foot 
apart, as directed. You state that after they 
are up they should be thinned out. This ad- 
vice is excellent, no doubt, but I did not thin 
out mine for the reason that only two of them 
ever came up, and an old speckled hen, who 
came off several days later with eight chicks, 
thinned out one of them. I did not consider 
that the other one needed thinning out. If I 
did wrong in not thinning it out please ad- 
vise me at once. You say this onion is of 
mild flavor, good size and flat shape, with 
white flesh. Perhaps it is just as well that no 
more of them came up. I have never yet 
come face to face with an onion of mild flavor, 
and, being naturally of a delicate constitu- 
tion, the surprise and consequent shock to the 
system might have been too much for me. 

Your directions for sowing the Pomeranian 
White Globe turnip stated that two pounds 
were sufficient for an acre. In trying to figure 
out from this basis how much to use on a 
patch of ground four feet by six I brought on 
a severe attack of brain fever, from which I 
am scarcely recovered at this writing, as you 
have doubtless already surmised. As a com- 
promise measure I sowed the whole contents 
of the package on the patch when I was able 
to be about again. Evidently I was off in my 
calculation. Either there was not enough 
ground or else too much seed. Would it be 
asking too much of you to see the commissary 
general or the secretary of war for me in regard 
to putting in a bid for furnishing the army 
with turnips this year? If everything goes 
right I expect to be able to furnish what few 
turnips will be used in the United States and 
Canada this season, and have plenty left for 
my own use, too. Already I am beginning to 
be known as the "turnip king" out here. 

The French Breakfast radish, according to 
the information on the package, is a quick- 
growing variety, brittle, crisp and tender. 
Your word is sufficient, of course. I sowed 
in dri lis, as directed, covering half an inch 
deep. In due course of time something did 
actually come up, but I was never able to 
identify it as a French Breakfast radish. It 
may have been a Norwiegan after-dinner 
cucumber, for all I know to the contrary. It 
died young. My pronunciation of the French 
is something quite out of the ordinary, any- 
how, and we never seemed to understand each 
other. I was never able to make it feel at 
home. It seemed to pine for the vine-clad 
hills and flower-scented valleys of sunny 
France. Possibly it overheard some of my 
French and thought it was in the wrong pew. 

I have never used radishes for breakfast, 
anyway. I am satisfied, though, that they 
would be bad for the digestion. Turnips are 



far better. I think turnips should be eaten at 
least three times a day. They are excellent 
for the complexion, and have even been known 
to start hair growing on a bald head. They 
are good for children who are cutting teeth, 
too. They are coming to be quite the fashion. 

I have no doubt the Eclipse beet is all 
that you claim fur it, but I haven't yet got it 
clear in my mind just what it aims to eclipse. 
Those you Bent me never seemed to want to 
eclipse anything. They seem to be easily dis- 
couraged. I have done everything I could 
think of to make it pleasant fur them here, 
but they do not seem to like the counlrv. 

This is a heavy yielding beet, you say. and 
produces smooth, globular bulbs. Up to the 
time this report was prepared mine had not 
produced a single, solitary globular bulb. I 
think you have been imposed upon. Who 
ever told you that they would produce globu- 
lar bulbs, anyway. No less an authority than 
my wife tells me that they produce greens. I 
even doubt that, at times. All they have 
succeeded in producing so far has been a cer- 
tain tired feeling, which I have every time I 
look at them. As far as globular bulbs are 
concerned, I wouldn't know what to do with 
them if I had them. 

It seems to me that if a person has all the 
nice Pomeranian White Globe turnips he 
wants he doesn't require globular bulbs, any- 
how. Turnips make a fine table dish. They 
seem to take the place of most every thing, and 
in case of sickness they are almost invaluable. 
If variety is desired they may be eaten either 
raw or cooked. 

The Perfection tomatoes did nicely at first. 
I think canned tomatoes are plenty good 
enough, though, and they are so much easier 
to raise. I planted the seeds in a box of rich 
earth, as directed, and they came up beauti- 
fully. At the proper time I transplanted them, 
and still they thrived. One day, during my 
absence from home, a neighbor's hen flew over 
into the yard, as near as I can judge, for when 
I returned there was nothing left of the Per- 
fection tomatoes but a few bare and unsightly 
stalks sticking up out of the ground in a de- 
jected sort of way, and numerous hen tracks 
in the soft earth around them, to tell the tale. 
Unfortunately I am unable to iurnish you 
with an accurate description of the hen, but I 
can tell you what I think of her, if you care 
for it. 

If I might lie permitted to supplement my 
report with a suggestion, I would say that 
what the Department of Agriculture seems to 
need, as much as anything, is the advice and 
encouragement of the neighbors around here. 
I have found it almost invaluable. Most of 
them buy their vegetables of a Chinaman, but 
they know more about how to grow vegetables 
in one minute than the Department of Agri- 
culture knows in a month of Sundays. And 
the best part of it is they are perfectly will- 
ing, and even anxious at times, to part with 
their knowledge. They don't think any more 
of giving away knowledge than I would of 
giving away turnips. 

If the department should decide to make 
UBe of them, and considers it advisable to call 
any or all of them to Washington, I ivould 
requeBt that there need be no hesitancy in do- 
ing soon my account. The turnips have now 
reached the Btage when they can do nicely 
without any advice whatever, and I will try 
to worry along myself, somehow. 

And now, in closing this report, kindly 
allow me to state that I shall not be at the 
disposal of the government another season. I 
would be pleased to privately suggest the 
names of several people whom you might try 
it on. There are several people whom I should 
like to Bee have a whack at it, though I am 
not naturally a vindictive person. 

I am well, but have been having some 
trouble with corns lately. Hoping this will 
find you the same, I remain, 

Yours truly, 

HoOi BOOM. 



6 



Western Graphic 




To the Profession. — A special feature of the We tern 
Graphic is its Department of Music and Art, which is in charge 
of an experienced and careful editor. Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and w ill l>e published free. All communications 
should be sent in by Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Kditor of Western 
Gkaphic, Los Angeles. 

AN event that was a dream of loveliness 
was the reception and recital given by 
the Woman's Orchestra at Blanchard Hall 
Tuesday evening. It was a summer crowd 
that filled the auditorium, and fair woman in 
her most bewitching, fluffiest gown with 
transparant sleeves occupied four chairs to 
the man's one; for it was at the bidding of the 
Woman's Orchestra that they were out for the 
evening, and what could be more natural 
than that the fair sex should greatly predom- 
inate. Be it said of the wisdom and gener- 
osity of the ladies of the orchestra that the 
affair was purely invitational and from hall 
rent to the po.-t-concert refreshments the en- 
tire expense was defrayed by the organization. 
It was wise in that not even tbVmost blood- 
thirsty critic could indulge his spleen on the 
rendition of a private musical program, and 
generous because it was a treat to hundreds 
of friends of the orchestra to not only hear 
them in a number of selections, but to meet 
and chat with them over a glass of punch. It 
was a well selected, though heavy, program 
and the to be-expected nervousness of the per 
formers was but slightly apparent. The pro- 
gram was: "Grand March from Tannhauser," 
Wagner; "Vorspiel to fifth act of King Man- 
fred," Reinecke; "Overture to Don Juan," Mo- 
zart; Contralto solo: "The Violet," Miltonberg, 
Miss Adelaide Loring; "Paraphrase on Mel- 
ody in F," Rubinstein; "Berceuse," Gounod; 
Hungarian Overture, "The two Hussars," 
Doppler. Miss Adelaide Loring showed a 
very sweet contralto and responded to an en- 
core with a pretty little song from "The Gie- 
sha." She was accompanied by Miss Ross. 



Musicians are by nature active people and 
when there is a dearth of things public de- 
manding their talents they must find an out- 
let for their energies in private parties and 
musicales. One of these was the high tea and 
reception given by Mrs. Grace Henderson 
Mathewson at her home on Lovelace avenue 
Monday evening in honor of Mrs. Genevra 
Johnstone-Bishop. The menu cards were pic- 

MISC ELLANEOUS 

A. M. E D E L M A N 

ARCHITECT 

Removed to BLANCH ARI) MUSIC HALL BUILDING 
Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone, Red 1341 

O A. DOBINSON 

DRAMATIC TRAINING 

VOICE and physical CULTURE 

Studio 526 S Spring Apply by letter or between hours of 10-12M 

»yV«VV«V«YVVVVVVY«VVVVVV«VVVV«VVVi£ 

m 

* 
* 



| Dcwcy 



19 H 

"fiard-JVIan" 

~Co Match 



Competent jfudges say 

* the Same of the 

j» SOLE AGENTS * 

* LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY * 

* Phone Green 1444 313 S. Broadway. * 
J» * 
********************************** 



f)ardman piano \ 



tures of the different old missions of Southern 
Cali fornia, and the decorations were of the 
national flower, the goldenrod. After tea 
came an informal musical program: Mrs. 
Wheeler recited a New England sketch; Mrs. 
Bishop sang the "Jewel Song" and "Le-par- 
la-te-da" from Faust; G. A. Dobinson read 
two poems from Kipling, after which Dr. Mer- 
ritt E. Gates of Washington related some 
anecdotes concerning the writing of the verses, 
he having been a personal friend of Rudyard 
Kipling; Miss Anna Virginia Metcalf sang 
two pretty ballads and the hostess sang one 
of Marzial's songs; Mrs. W. D. Larrabee was 
at the piano. The guests were: Dr. and Mrs. 
E. C. Buell, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Plater, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. N. Flint, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pet- 
tigrew, Mr. and Mrs. B. U. Baumgardt, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Frasers, Mr. and Mrs. Wal- 
ter S. Newhall, Mr. and Mrs. Will E. Chapin, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Larrabee, Mrs. Ella Bal- 
lard Hanna, Mrs. Wheeler, Dr. Merrill E. 
Gates of Washington D. C.; Dr. W. LeMoyne 
Mills, Mies Nora Sterry, Miss Jane Peril y, 
Miss E. Louis Clark, Mr. Guy Hill, Miss Au- 
gusta Heinzeman, Mr. Edwin Clark, Mr. Her- 
bert Clark, Mies Virginia Metcalf, Miss Anna 
Mills, Mr. Charles Forman. 

M iss Ellen Beach Yaw is at last to sing in 
opera and Sir Arthur Sullivan is writing 
especially to suit her phenomenal voice. 

Owen Foster returned to his organ at St. 
Paul's pro-Cathedral Sunday, after having 
spent some weeks in San Diego directing the 
presentation of a new opera written by him- 
self. 

Miss Beresford Joy, who has sung contralto 
in the Calvary Church choir, San Francisco, 
has resigned that position and will leave for 
Chicago August first to take a position in a 
choir there. 

M. Paul de Longpre, the painter of flow- 
ers, who is known as "le roi des fleurs," was 
in San Francisco last week for a few days en 
route to Shasta. He put up at the Palace Hotel 
and was royally entertained by M. H. de 
Young at his San Rafael home "Meadow- 
lands." 

Mrs. E. A. Movers of South Bonnie Brae 
street has had the pleasure of entertaining 
two distinguished ladies in music and art cir- 
cles the past week: Miss Mary Li nek, whose 
delightful contralto voice was heard in opera 
at the Los Angeles last season, has just com- 
pleted an engagement with a New York opera 
company and is visiting her friend until the 
last of the month when she begins an engage- 
ment in San Francisco. On her trip to Los 
Angeles she was accompanied by the distin- 
guished sculptress, Mrs. Lulu Movers, who is 
also a guest of Mrs. Movers. 

NEW MUSIC AT BLANCHARD'S 

SoDfre: "Sea Dreams," Frank L. Moir; "I Dare to 
Love Thee," F. Paolo Tosti. Piano: Bartlett's "A 
Dream," transcribed for piano by Heinrich Kiehl; 
"Marcietta," P. Supessi. 



Tailoring and Repairing: 

Suits made to order, goods the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

II . L. Yeroer, 118 West Second Street. 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MMK. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTONE-BISHOP 

CONCERT and ORATORIO SOLOIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

Pupil: Madame Anna de La Orange, Paris; Signor Bandagger, 
Frederick Walker, London. 

Studio— BLANCHARD Ml SIC AND ART Bl'lLDINO 

Residence -Bellcvue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, wilh Mis. Modini-Wood 
(107 Kigueroa street. 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 

230 Bellman Block 

THOMAS W . WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY 

ORi:anist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Residence and Studio G21West17tii 



MRS. F.RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 

and SOLO PI \NISTK 

References: 

Blanchard Piano Co., L. A. f>14 Booth Main Street, 
Edward schirner, Berlin 

Moritz Moszkowski, Paris Los Angeles, Cal. 



J. BOND FRANCISCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
Mild TEACHER 

Pupil of 

Emanuel Wikth, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 

Studio— 

BL VNCHARD BUILDING 



MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHES OF PIANO-FORTE 511 SIC 

Pupil ol J H. Haiin, Director Detroit, Mich., Corservatory ol 
Music; and of II. C. Post, Granil Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Studio, 433 W. Ninth St. 

Lcb Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANI-T 



MRS. W. B. CLAPP 



TEACHES OF VOC4I, Ml SIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Pinging a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 



FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

STUDIO, 300 Blanchard Building 
M US. JAMES FRANKLYN COOK, SOLO Pianist 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons 



MISS MYRTLE CANADY 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and concetrs accepted. 

At Studio SUITE 316 BLANCHARD BUILDING Wednesdav, 
Residence— Thursdav, Saturdav, forenoons. 

California Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M llfW 



FRED. 



BACON 



TEACHER OF VOICE CULTURE 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesdav. Thursday, Saturday 
SUITE SIX & 319 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTURE 
Pure Italian Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

315 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VOICE CULTURE 
Formerly Soprano with the Heywdod Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Kiidays. Studio, 816 BLANCHARD Building 



ROLLA E. GARDNER 

HANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Studio, 230% South Si rinu St 



MISS M 



PEARSON 



VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal culture, piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. PJ22 8. GRAND AVE. 



PROF. M. S. AREVALO 

GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice Culture 
Studio, 138 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and FirRt Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Vacation at Chicago. Return about August loth 

E~D WARD SIERRA 

OF MEXICO < ONSERV ATOBY 

Private Lessons in 

Piano, Mandolin and Violin 204 WIL80N BLOCK 



Western Graphic 



7 




In the Gay Life 

I WONDER why it is that whenever I see 
Mr. Blanchard I want to call him Mr. 
Fitzgerald and when I see Mr. Fitzgerald it 
is just the other way! Not that the gentle- 
men are the least twin like— quite the contrary. 
For while the one (which one now?) is dis- 
tinctly hlonde, the other is distinctly not. 
However, the one (either one) is distinctly 
amiable and the other is — distinctly — also. 
For the other evening after the entertainment 
given by the Woman's Orchestra in the new 
Blanchard Hall, I was speaking to the one 
(which one, did you say?) fully an hour and 
a half, hoping the while some good fairy 
would chance along and address him by name, 
and when no one did, of course, and I finally 
rose to the occasion with that finesse which 
some mortals possess, by asking him, without 
any abruptness at all: "Is this your hall?" 
He answered in the best natured way imagin- 
able: "Why, yes, now whose did you think it 
was?" "I did not know but that it was Mr. 
Fitzgerald's," I said most naturally in the 
world. I was going to make up how I next 
met Mr. Fitzgerald but it isn't necessary. 
This preamble is sufficient to say the two 
names are synonymous for many things in 
Los Angeles of which the least of these is ami- 
ability, and the greatest — that music which 
has gained the stronghold it has in Southern 
California is due to the untiring efforts of 
these two gentlemen. Now Mr. Blanchard 
has added art to his other muse — but enough. 
"Puffs" are pouring in on all sides from news- 
paperdom here as it is. 

Mrs. Blanchard, by the way, is at home 
again after spending some seven months in 
the east, mostly in Boston, and the Fitzger- 
alds have been quartered at the Van Nuys 
since their trip north. 

The entertainment of the Woman's Or- 
chestra passingly alluded to was deemed par- 
ticularly fine by a large audience of specta- 
tors and listeners. Society had turned out 
very well and the patronesses and "aides," 
many in evening dress, gave the affair "quite 
a tone." Mrs. Sheldon Borden looked parti- 
cularly attractive in a ravishing pink, gauzy 
gown, run with narrow ruchings of pink satin 
ribbon. The reception, which was part of the 
program, seemed very enjoyable. Ices were 
served in abundance, and a dance, probably 
impromptu, came in quite appropriately at 
the close. 

Some honored guests, visitors in Los An- 
geles who have been considerably feted of 
late, have been Miss Nellie McFarland of Ohio 

1 SGHRflMSBERGl 

...WINES... 



The Host Famous of California 



Ws<3& 



Light, Delicate 



Wines if® 



Matured in Underground m§Eot 



Cellars and Bottled 



with || 
great care at the Vineyard 



PACIFIC COAST AOCNTS 



Sherwood & Sherwood 



who has been visiting her grandfather, Mr. Al- 
bert McFarland, and who was given a large 
lawn party recently; Miss Mabel Stoddard of 
Savannah, Ga , the guest of Mrs. Shirley 
Ward, the recipient of dinners, etc., given by 
Miss Irene Stephens, Miss Beatrice Chandler 
and others, and Miss Mattie Scott of San 
Diego who is visiting her relatives in the 
Baker Block and who has received many little 




Photo by Schumacher 



Mansard-Collier Hng. 

JUDGE WAI.DO M. YORK 
In his cosy cottage at Terminal Island he spends not only his summers, but mnnv 



Lob Angeles 



San Francisco 



Portland 



hours at other times when judicial duties allow 

attentions from a large circle of friends here. 
Miss Scott will go to San Francisco for a time 
before returning home and it is whispered, 
though ever so softly, that an announcement 
of interest is on the tapis in which this charm- 
ing young lady and a gentleman whose name 
sounds like a business block of Los Angeles 
are to be the principals. And this recalls 
an old romance. Miss Scott is a niece of 
Mr. Cave Coutts, a Spanish gentleman and a 
descendant of the famous old Bandini family, 
and Mr. Coutts one time last summer told a 
story with the most unspeakable naivete of 
"how we boys used to tease mother for propos- 
ing to father." 

There were three daughters of the old Ad- 
miral Bandini, all very handsome, and the 
father the prisoner of the dashing young 
Colonel Coutts of the American army — which 
is all historical. Now the Colonel, as Mr. 
Cave Coutts slyly remarked, found it extremely 
necessary to visit his prisoner every day, 
sometimes three times daily, and he found 
that he loved all three of his prisoner's 
daughters, each for a charm of her own. He 
could not really decide which he loved best 
until one night on one of his country's errands 
the one daughter that escorted him to the gate 
playfully threw her lace mantilla over his 
head. The grace of this movement so capti- 



vated the young colonel that in that in- 
stant it was clear to him which he loved 
best. "And this daughter was my mother," 
eaid Mr. Coutts. Mrs. Coutts is still living 
and is to a great extent the senora of Helen 
Hunt's Ramona. Mrs. Jackson visited Mrs. 
Coutts here some time before writing her 
novel and has drawn much of her narrative 
from incidents relating to Mrs. Coutts' home 
and family. Mr. Cave Coutts 
is the Filipe, and he really 
was the one whofell and 
sprained his ankle in that fam- 
ous sheep shearing time. But 
now I am giving away too 
much for nothing. 

The week has been full of 
pleasant hospitalities. Mre. 
John E. Plater gave a card 
party in the Baker block one 
evening.Mrs. Carl Kurtz bad 
an afternoon on Wednesday 
under the same hospitable 
roof. Miss Urquiza enter- 
tained a number of her 
friends very charmingly on 
Thursday evening at her 
home on San tee street 

Mr. Byron Erkenbrecher 
gave a luncheon on the 17lh 
in honor of Gov. 0. N. Mur- 
phy of Arizona. His other 
guests were F. K. llule, ex- 
Mayor Snyder, W. G. Bluett, 
G. J. Griffith, F. B. Silver- 
wood, T. E. Gibbon, J. Ross 
Clark, Frank Thomas and C. 
A. Sumner. 

Mr8 Johnstone-Bishop was 
tendered another high ociety 
ovation on Monday, then e- 
tertainer on this occasion be- 
ing Mrs. Grace Henderson 
Mathewson of Lovelace ave. 

Mr.J. Cohn was given a 
farewell banquet at the 
Mais^on Doree one evening last 
week, prior to a trip of some 
extent through Europe. 
Santa Monica is having the additions of 
Mrs. Plater, Mrs. Waddilove and the Fosters 
for the summer. 

Mrs. Dan McFarland among others is to 
have open house at Redondo during the tour- 
nament, and her young daughters are to have 
a share in doing the honors. 

Artist Will E Chapin will leave the last of 
the week with A. A. Newell, chief V. S. 
hydrographer and J. B. Lippincott, resident 
hydrographer on a trip into the high Sierras 
to investigate the available water supply with 
a view of locating sites for government storage 



reservoirs. 



{ mount Eowe Railway 



ECHO 
$ 



Mngnllicent Panorama of Karl h and Ocean 
'irandest Trip on Karth 

MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

IITl'ATKD mi the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3. r i00 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appnrtmeiili 
with or without baths Cuisine unexcelled 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

tiuests remaining one week or longer w II I be al- 
lowed a rebate of their .Mount Ixiwe Itallwav fine 



to Kcho Mountain and reliiru and a 50c round trl) 
rate to I 
de- i ri d . 



IP 

rale lo Los Angeles, and llle to |'a-adena dully II 
desired. 

Tickets and full Information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

I'raftle and Kxruntlim Agi-ot 

Los Angeles Cal. 
Main 960 



214 South Spring St, 
Tel. 



Western Graphic 




frou-frou's Cbat 

Of the fads and fashions of Both Qexea 




EVER 6ince the world was inflicted with 
woman she has been the victim of 
many a "josh" about her dress, at least in the 
later centuries for her extravagant weakness 
in that direction, and I must admit I see very 
little indication of any moderation along 
those lines at present. I take it our reader is 
one of our "happy-go-lucky, end-of-the-cen- 
tury" girls who will pardon me if some of my 
remarks appear a little broad perhaps. Speak- 
ing of the end of the century girl reminds 
me of one of the funny remarks I have acci- 
dently overheard during the last two weeks 
since our Angel City has been hostess to our 
many eastern guests. An old gentleman (I 
took him to be a Hoosier) was patiently wait- 
ing for his car atone of the down town cor- 
ners with his wife and her six maiden sisters 
— by the way, why didn't they bring more 
brothers along, too — when two elegantly 
gowned ladies swept by in all their beruflled 
and lacy billowyness, dragging a generous 
amount of it after them on the pavement, and 
old Rube says to ma: "Waal, I believe if it 
was the fashion for women to push a wheel 
barrow down the middle of the street those 
two would be the first to start it." Now if 
that dear old man had only known how much 
truth there was in that remark and how flat- 
tered those ladies would have been if they had 
heard it; for every up to-date woman prides 
herself on being among the first to introduce 
a new style. 

I wonder how many of my readers 6aw 
the picture of the hand in one of our eastern 



papers last week illustrating the evil effects of 
the long, heavy skirts. It shows how the 
muscles of the hand and wrist are enlarged 
to ugly proportions and produces a very un- 
gainly appearance. They call the enlarged 
wrist the "petticoat wrist." 

It is easy to see what we are coming to 
very soon, at least some of us, now that the 
automibiles are on the way. The faddish girl 
has had to content herself with tennis and 
golf, and at times it has seemed that the stock 
of new fads was ebbing rapidly, but now 
there will be no end of opportunities for a 
capricious summer girl to invent new fancies, 
for in the east everything is "automo." It is 
automobile parasols, automobile stick pins 
and automobile gowns; but I must tell you 
that the automobile has been the salvation of 
the brunette, for everything is automobile 
red. 

There has never been a summer before 
when the outdoor girl has had such oppor 
tunities as this summer of 1899. She is no 
more the timid, nervous girl of the past, but 
she has now learned how to enjoy a summer 
and she will plan most enjoyable outings. 
She knows how to dress comfortably for sports, 
stylishly for yachting and bewitchingly for 
evening. She will not only have dancing and 
flirting, but these will be interspersed with 
3'achting, rowing, tennis.golf and even bicycle 
riding, for if the automobiles are coming her 
muscles must be in the finest trim to handle 
the brakes, etc. By the way, it is not such an 
easy thing to do. 



Hajarlis 

I loved Hajarlis, and was loved — 

Both children of the desert we; 
And deep as were her lustrous eyes, 

My image ever could I see. 
And in my heart she also shown, 

As doth a star above a well; 
And we each other's thoughts enjoyed, 

As camels listen to a bell. 
A Sheik unto Hajarlis came, 

And said: "Thy beauty fires my dreams; 
Young Ornab spurn! fly to my tentl 

So shalt thou walk in golden beams." 
But from the Sheik my maiden turned, 

And he was wroth with her and me; 
Hajarlis down a pit was lowered, 

And I was fastened to a tree. 
Nor bread nor water had she there; 

But oft a slave would come and go; 
O'er the pit bent he, muttering words, 

And aye took back the unvarying "No!" 
The simoon came with sullen glare! 

Breathed Desert-mysteries through my tree! 
I only heard the starving sighs 

From that pit's mouth unceasingly. 

Day after day, night after night, 
Hajarlis' famished moans I hear! 

And then I prayed her to consent — 
For my sake, in my wild despair. 

Calm strode the Sheik, looked down the pit, 
And eaid: "Thy beauty now is gone; 

Thy last moans will thy lover hear, 

While thy slow torments feed my scorn I" 



They spared me that I still might know 
Her thirst and frenzy; till at last 

The pit was silent! and I felt 

Her life — and mine — were with the past. 

A friend that night cut through my bonds; 

The Sheik amidst his camels slept; 
We fired his tents, and drove them in, 

And then with joy I screamed and wept, 

And cried: "A spirit comes arrayed, 
From that dark pit in golden beams! 

Thy Blaves are fled, thy camels mad — 
Hajarlis once more fires thy dreams!" 

The camels blindly trod him down, 
While still we drove them o'er his bed; 

Then with a stone I beat his breast, 
As I would smite him ten times dead. 

— Richard Hengist Horxk. 



Ironical Ifs 

If a man has no dust his name is usually 
mud. 

If a man has horse sense he should know 
when to say neigh. 

If the cat scratches you it is always the 
sign of the Maltese cross. 

If a man would follow the advice he gives 
to others he would soon be perfect. 

If canes were to go out of fashion some 
young men would have no visible means of 
support. 

He lay and dreamed of silvery bells, 
He heard celestial harpists play; 

The clock was ringing the alarm, 

But it merely helped him dream away. 



HER SONG 

She sang: "When Jack comes home again," 

And wept at every note; 
Ah, could she have been guessing 
That, as so often in the past, 
When Jack came shuffling in at last 

He'd be as tipsy as a goat? 

ANOTHER VIEW OF THE CAPE 

Jack — There is nothing so interesting to a 
woman as a man's love. 

Maude— Oh, I don't know! Sometimes 
there is nothing so disgusting. 

Jack — For instance? 

Maude — When he is in love with some 
other woman. 



WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 

N". E. A. 

TT71ASTBRN To ^ e f° r Men or Boyp 

LONDON CLOTHING CO. 

I 19 to 125 N. Spring St. 

HARRIS & FRANK, Props. 



«v««y«y «*««««««**«««*«»««**«*»«**« 




Photo- 
graphic 

Supplies? 



Cd. m. 1291 J 



j» 211 South Main 
* Los Angeles, 
* 

9>««*«r.»*««tl(ll«****«K*«A»«K»««K«««« 



• cal - ^£YvW\^%(Jtf: 5 



W. W. SWEENEY 



Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. 'he only 
manufacturer in K. California. Rtmember the 
number, 213 VV. Fourth St. 



HALT! 

There In a 



Military boarding 
School 

I nJSout hern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Made 
Military Training: Manly 

I'arentH will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful in deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sous. Mailed free upon application. 

Los Anaeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake I'ark. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Turk. 

C. C. Kinery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter It Wlmul Ma ager 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Cbe palace 

A Select Family l!e ort 

Patronized by the banlnw men of the city with 
their families". Elegantly fitted, co d in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refilled music. No Vaudeville 
Keatanrant and Befreahmenta 
Last car of the evening in every dlrectiou and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
Aftei Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS 

5ftc, li'ic to »0c vd, 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 
5oc, 65c to 75c vd. 
-sfcsBj^fl LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 
^ 00 to 90c. BG to 50c 

REFRIGERATORS S5, «7.50 to »20 
WJlSJ'TtsSaV 1 • T ■ J" A It T I N , 531-535 So. Soring St. 
M <a53&fc=*v-— Wheel chairs sold or rented. 




Western Graphic 



9 




Certrrinal Island 



Che Brighton Beach of Southern California; a Seaside Resort of 
Sudden Life that a Complete Realization of its JVIanifold 
Httractions is Just Being Hwakened. 

CHARLES DWICHT WILLAKIL 



Such 



his 



BY 

*» *» »* »» 

EUY beach has its admirers, but 
the confirmed Terminal Islander is 
the most enthusiastic and uncom- 
promising of all. One gets the im- 
pression from the general trend of 
argument that the only service of real 




importance accomplished by the great Pacific 
Ocean, as it washes the shores of three conti- 
nents, is to provide Terminal 
Island with the means for 
boating, bathing and fishing. 
There may be other beaches, 
he says; indeed he has a 

vague impression that he once j ^m ^^o^^^^^^^^ =r=gg 
heard or read of names like ^\ » r | > I k | ' I I | ' M^TJ 

Santa Monica, Redondo and 
Catalina — and Long, Beach 
he passes every day — but ^ 
what are these to him but 
mere out lying stations in 
purgatory leading the way to 
the real heaven? And a refer- 
ence to heaven recalls the 
story that is told of one of 
the Island's most fervid ad- 
mirers who recently told his 
friends of a dream in which 
he found himself transported 
above to the realms of the 
blest. It was an unusually vivid dream, and 
he was able to describe in detail what he saw 
and heard — the golden streets and the glo- 
rious music of the spheres. 

"Well, how did you like it all?" he was 
asked. 

"0, it was grand, sublime and gorgeous be- 



pecial merits of the place lie in the fac 
that it has still water for boating, in addition 
to the surf for bathing; and it is within con- 
venient distance from Los Angeles. Terminal 
is no longer an island but a peninsula, low, 
narrow and "ong, lying between the ocean of 
San Pedro Bay and the calm waters of the Wil- 



mington Lagoon. In former years it was sur- 



those of Mrs. Boschke, who might be called 
the earliest setiler, and of Frank .1. Thomas, 
the well known attorney. In the spring and 
summer of 18!>7 something like a dozen houses 
were built, and among the new comers were 
Judge Waldo M. York of the Superior bench, 
F. W. Wood, the manager of the Los Angeles 
Railway system; Dr. J. Ross Kirkpatrick, 
Horace G. Miller, Lee A. McConntll, Sumner 
P Hunt, the architect; C. S. Walton, former 
secretary of La Fiesta; Percy A. Wilson, the 
attorney; C. I). Willard, Ernest K. Foster, 
formerly of the public library board of Los 
Angeles, and W. F. Bosbyshell. 

The next year there came a number more 
to build houses, among them C. A. Sumner, F. 
K. Rule, H. M. Sale, Chas. Xordhoff of Red- 
lands, .1. M. Elliott and Frank A. Gibson of 
the First National Bank, W. D. Woolwine of 
the Los Angeh s National Bank, T. M. Wads- 
worth, Dr. W. W. Hitchcock, Lin Helm and 
J. E. Waterman, attorneys, Major K. W. Jones, 
and George J. Denis of the Code Commis- 
sion. Since then houses have sprung up with 




THE ONLY STILL WATER, Ol'KS" SEA BATHINU I'LACE ON THE SOI Til KKN COAST 



rounded on all sides by water, but the Terminal 
Railway Company, when it purchased the prop- 
erty from the Dominguez family and built a 
railway line the full length of the Island, cut off 
the flow of the tide water at the eastern end 
by an embankment, and one may now walk 
to the Island dry shod. There is a charm 




AS THE SAN PKDBO 8HIPP1NG LOOKS PROM TERMINAL ISLAND 



yond my wildest expectation — although it did 
not come up to Terminal Island." 

The joy of the Terminal Islander in his 
possession of a few square yards of flat and 
barren sand may be surprising to those who 
have merely passed over the Island in the cars 
on their way to San Pedro or Catalina, but it 
seems entirely reasonable andjproper to any- 
one who has spent a summer on the Island. 



about the very expression "the Island," which 
will cling even after the shore line is built up 
into a solid phalanx of houses from East San 
Pedro to Long Peach. 

The beginning of Terminal Island as a 
popular summer resort dates back about three 
years. Prior to the spring of 1897 there were 
only three residences and a few boarding places 
on the Island. Chief of the former were 



a rapidity that it is difficult to follow. A few 
more owners may be mentioned, W. C. Patter- 
son, president of the Los Angeles National 
Bank, J. A. Graves, attorney, A. W. Armstrong 
of Pasadena, W. H. Bolabird, Dr. Houston of 
Pasadena, Miss Clark of Pasadena, C. B. 
Boothe, Dr. B. M. Pomeroy, Dr. S. H. Tol- 
hurst. 

These houses for the most part front di- 
rectly on the ocean, but a few feet distant from 
the waves, and they are much more substan- 
tial and commodious than the structures that 
are generally to be found at beach resorts. 
The original projectors of the colony, the Ter- 
minal Railway and the real estate firm of 
Silent & Sumner, were wise in laying out the 
lots on a frontage of fifty feet instead of 
twenty-five. There are only two cases of 
"i?plit lots" in the whole line, and several 
residences take up seventy- five feet. Most of 
the architectural work of the Island, perhaps 
more than half, is by Hunt ft Eisen, although 
Haley has some pretty houses, and also Mor- 
gan and Brown. There are no "beach shanties," 
and tents are not allowed, except at the lower 
end of the Island back some distance from 
the beach. The houses average in cost some- 
where about $1,500, many 
of them running to $2,000, 
$3,000 or even $4,000 and 
more. The majority of them 
have their living rooms 
done in wood instead of 



raphic 




Mausard-Colllrr Eng Co. 

THE END OF THE PLEASURE WHARF 




DeaJ Man's Island 
Entrance to Inner Hartur 



ISLAND AND SAN PEDRO HARBOR 



12 



Western Graphic 



plaster, which allows for artistic effects in dec- 
oration. Good taste for the most part pre- 
vails both in the construction and the furni 
shing of these summer homes. 

The occupations- of the summer residents 
of the Island cover a somewhat wider range 
than may be found at places of 
less opportunity. There is good 
fishing at the wharf, and at 
high tide one may throw in a 
line almost from his frontdoor- 
step and pull out a whiting or 
a halibut. The best fishing is to 
be had from boats either in the 
kelp in the harbor or out at 
sea. Notable [catches are made 
of barracuda, bass, yellowtail 
and bonita Yachting in the 
Bay of San Pedro is a delightful 
sport, and in the summer time 
races are occasionally held. On 
the smooth waters of the lagoon 
the boating is perfect, and most 
of the residents have row boats, 
and some of them have power 
launches. The Terminal Island 
Boat Club has a charming little 
club house^on the inner bay, and 
the Catalina Yacht Club has 
a handsome home on the ocean 
front. The bathing in the surf 
is as nearly perfect as one could 
imagine. The water is warm 
and the waves are seldom high 
enough to be troublesome. The bay is so 
sheltered by Catalina Island and by Point 
Firmin that it is, as a rule, almost as placid 
as a small lake. The shore is a gentle slope, 
where one may wade a hundred feet before 
coming to deep water. Children play all day 
long in the waves with no risk of drowning. 
A competent instructor, Mr. Adolph Kahn, 
teaches swimming to all who wish to learn, 
and great numbers of ladies and children 
have acquired the art under his care. 

There is a wide plank walk running the 
full length of the Island, brilliantly lighted 
by night with electricity. It is a popular 
promenade and is thronged with people in the 
afternoon and evening. The hard sand of the 
beach is admirable for driving or bicycling, 
and the fiower-covered hillocks, or dunes, are 
beautifully adapted to the form of conversa- 
tional art that is in vogue among young 
people passing the summer at the beach — 
places that are at once properly public and sat- 
isfactorily secluded. There is a golf club, and 
links are in process of construction. There 
are several interesting places to visit near the 
Island— San Pedro, Wilmington, Deadman's 
Island and Point Firmin among the number. 

The principal hotel on the Island is the 
"Gordon Arms," which is owned by Mr. F. S. 
Gordon and managed by Mr. S. P. Anderson. 
It is a handsome structure, designed by Mr. 
Haley, and it is situated on the ocean front. 
Although it has been in operation only a 
short time, it has already proved itself one of 
the most popular of the ocean resort houses. 
The Saturday night hops attract numbers of 
young people from Los Angeles, and many 
social clubs make it their rendezvous. It is a 
first-class house, run in elegant 
stvle, but withfairly moderate 
rates. The "Gordon Arms" 
will remain open during the 
winter, and with its beautiful 
sun parlor will doubtless 
prove a favorite resort for 
Eastern people. . 



At the lower end of the island stands the 
Terminal Tavern, where one may get a good 
fish dinner or other refreshment. 

On. Sundays and holidays the Terminal 
Railroad brings great numbers of day visitors 
down to the beach. Music is provided by the 



front of the long .line of summer homes, 
or for that matter all the year round 
homes, as many who sought out Terminal as 
a summer resort have found it to be an ideal 
home place in winter as well. This peculiar 
frontage to old ocean is one of the strong 
points in favor of this beach, thus avoiding 




THE (JOKDOX ARMS— A CHEERFUL HOTEL BY THE SAD SEA WAVES 



Mexican Band; everybody takes a dip in the 
ocean and then lies down on the clean, warm 
sand. The air is generally cool — invariably 
so in the shade — and for the city resident, who 
is unable to spend any length of time at the 
beach, this is the beet possible substitute. 

The present season at Terminal Island is 
one of the liveliest the Island has ever wit- 
nessed. All the cottages are filled, and they 
are foi the most part occupied by their owners. 
An admirable train service has been estab- 
lished by the railroad, with six trains a day 
each way. The hops at the Gordon Arms 
have been mostdelightful affairs; and although 
the social life of the residents is decidedly 
calm, as most of them come to the Island 
seeking rest and quiet, there is nevertheless a 
good deal of informal entertainment con- 
stantly in progress. 

The standard by which an ocean resort is 
to be judged is not the amount of style it puts 
on or the social prominence of its guests, but 
the real comfort and enjoyment of those who 
pass their summer on its shores. Tried by 
this standard, Terminal Island is all that its 
admirers claim for it, and its sudden building 
up is a decided gain to Los Angeles and 
Southern California. 



the glare of the afternoon sun that becomes 
so disagreeable and trying to visitors at many 
other resorts. The absence of breakers and 
freedom from undertow makes bathing abso- 
lutely safe. The absolute freedom from harsh 
winds is a desideratum to whatever one is do- 
ing, be it bathing, boating, strolling or at 
home. The nearness of the still waters of 
San Pedro harbor for bathing, boating or fish- 
ing are very desirable and alone would be 
much preferred to many resorts of boasted 
advantages. Terminal probably has one of 
the best all-the-year-round climates in the 
world and enjoys one of the most equable 




A tribute to Terminal Island that comes 
from the heart of a proud father is the state- 
ment of Chas. S. Walton that he attributes 
the life of his child to the salubrious and be- 
nign climate of the western Brighton beach. 
Mr. Walton has a charming cottage in the 
row and is himself one of those genial men 
whom every one likes to meet. 

Each and every resort has special attrac- 
._ tions, but few can truthfully 

claim as many as can Ter- 
minal, one of the newest to be 
fully recognized and appre- 
ciated on account of its 
many merits. The sun rise 
at Terminal is directly in 




s. B. HYSES 

General Manager of the Los Angeles Terminal Railway Co. 

temperatures of any resort known. The mean 
average difference bet-veen cold and heat as 
recorded for Terminal in July and January is 
only 14 degrees. San Diego's boasted average, 
one of the most even in the world, is 15 de- 
grees; Los Angeles. 16 degrees; Sacramento,27 
degrees; Mentone, Italy, 33 degrees. 



Western Graphic 



I. S 




XTcrirrinal 
Cavern 



CLOSE by the main depot at Terminal 
and just across the wharf approach 
from the pavilion is Terminal Tavern, the 
pioneer hotel and restaurant of the island, 
of which McCament, the well known 
Pasadena caterer, is proprietor and man- 
ager. The place has been thoroughly 
renovated since Mr. McCament took charge 
and the improvements have been recognized 
by a constantly increasing business. The 
Tavern has a limited number of rooms that 
are always in demand, and on this account 
the management caters principally to the 
crowds of day time beachers whose refresh- 
ment is provided for according to their needs. 




One can have a nice table d'note dinner for 
fifty cents, or indulge their special tastes a la 
carte from twenty-five cents up, a specialty be- 
ing made of fine fish and other sea foods. Then 
there is a lunch counter where the picnicers 
supplement the contents of their hampers 
(though they are fast recognizing that it is far 
more agreeable to buy their entire lunch) 
with coffee or sandwiches, either of which 
cost but five cents, or a dish of ice 
cream. There is also a fine soda fountain in 
connection. On Sundays the Mexican Phil- 
harmonic band playing in the pavilion op- 
posite makes the lunch and dinner hours most 
delightful. A fine stock of wines are kept on 
hand and altogether the Tavern is one of the 
best of seaside hostleries. 



T. E. GIBBON 

IT IS fitting that in connection with ex- 
tensive information concerning Terminal 
Island there should be mention made of T. E. 
Gibbon, vice-president and general counsel of 
the Terminal Railway Company, and due 
credit given to the man whose brains have 
been called upon for much of the grand suc- 
cess in the upbuilding of the place. Mr. 
Gibbon is a man of lofty ideals, though prac- 
tical in the extreme, and while Terminal Is- 
land with its manifold natural and artificial 
advantages is an achievement at which most 
men would be satisfied, Mr. Gibbon is not con- 



tent but has a stake set for future work that 
is as far from the vision of the average man 
as the present delightful town appeared im- 
possible but a few years since. He ie an en- 
thusiast on the possibilities for Terminal and 
his rosy views of the future would reform the 

(9 




T. E. GIBBON 

worst pessimist, could one be found on the 
Island. 

Mr. Gibbon has also made a lasting name 
for himself in the San Pedro Harbor fight and 
it is due largely to his efforts that rock is now 
being dumped into the sea within hearing 
distance of the residents of Terminal. He 
has been a resident of Los Angeles for eleven 
years and by indefatigable energy and his 
thorough knowledge of law has built him a 
niche in the commonwealth envied by many 
but begrudged by none. 



TERMINAL ISLAND NOTES 

DEMOLISHED bouquets, the "nubbins" 
of pink candles and several rows of 
empty Sauternes and Mumms in the glass 
breakfast room of the Gordon Arms were all 
that was left Sunday morning to tell the tale 




FBRD k. bulk 

Who through his Inrtfe Interests in the Terminal Lnnd 
Company I* a moving spirit in the progression of 
the Island. 

of the lavish and jolly entertainment of Sat- 
urday evening provided by Ferd K. Rule for 
a party of prominent N.E.A. people. After 
the banquet, during which a number of 
speeches were made, the visitors added their 
presence to the regular weekly Cinderella 
dance. 



There was a large number of Saturday 
nighters down and the popularity of these 
hops grows every week. 

One of the most charming features of the 
entertainment of Mr. Rule's party was a trip 




THE STEAM I'ELASU RE LAUNCH J. ('. ELLIOT '.' 

on the J. C. Elliott Sunday morning. Sky, 
wind and water vied with one another to 
charm our visitors and all declared that na 
ture had saved her choicest prize for Brighton 
beach. 

Among the guests registered at the Gordon 
Arms during the past week are Dr. and Mrs. 
Hendrix of Los Angeles, Mr. and Mrs. Tay- 
lor and daughter of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. 
Furlong of Pasadena, Ferd K. Rule and wife, 
Mrs. C. M. Baker and children, Robert Aitken, 
Oscar Lazansky, W. K. Crawford, Berkeley, 
Cal.; J. C. Brainard, D. S. Grosbeck, Pasa- 
dena; Miss S. M. Wilson, Mrs. A. L. Mann, 
Dr. A. C. Winstup, Miss Kate Fay, F. P. Fay, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Taylor, Miss Marie Tay- 
lor, J. M. (ireenwood and wifa, Josephine Her- 
mans, Mr. and Mrs Irwin Shepard, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. G. Lane and two daughters, Chicago, 



JOE FELLOWS 



UP TO. DATE 



Builder of tbe pleasure 

gasoline laiun'h 

J. C. ELLIOTT 



LAUNCHES 

SAIL BOATS Agent Union 

ROW BOATS .„„ cages'" 

IftnllVto Order TERMINAL, CAL. 



5 Wm. H. LEISHMAN • 

0 Propric i or <>r ^ 

• Ocean Planing Hill • 

• Terminal, Cal. • 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



z 
z 
z 
z 
z 

Z 
Z 

z 
z 
z 
z 
z 



C. A. SI MM R St CO 

Tel. Main 652 



EliWAItll D. SlI.KNT A Cl 

Tel Main Ml 



Terminal 
Island 



THE 1 1 >l \ I 

SPORTSMAN'S RESORT 



Best Fishing 
Best Sailing 



Beat Bathing 

Best Boadng 



LOTS FOR SALE 

By EDWARD D. SILENT & CO. 

212 West .Second St., Los Allude* 

Or C. A. SUnNER & CO. 

IIM Ho. ((roadway, Los AiikcIcb 



Z 

z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 
z 



zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 



Western Graphic 




The Gordon arms 

Terminal Island Ca l . 



THE GORDON ARMS 

ONE of the important points in the growth 
of a seaside resort is the time when its 
natural advantages allure capital to provide 

a first-class ho- 
tel. The growing 
popularity of 
Terminal Island 
among others 
than those own- 
ing their own 
cottages finally 
demanded hotel 
accommodations, and in July of this year the 
Gordon Arms was opened to the puhlic by 
Mr. Frank S. Gordon — a modern, comfortable, 
all-the-year-round home. It is a place to 
spend a day or a month — yes, a lifetime. 

The broad verandahs open right on the 
smooth, white beach; the large, airy rooms 
are close to the gentle rippling of the waters 
on the sands, so soothing to the tired brain 
and weary body. 

For the comforts of the inner man, the 
bright, sunny dining-room, with its elegant 
table service, affords pleasant surroundings 
for the enjoyment of the excellent cuisine. 
The spacious halls and parlors, luxuriously 
furnished, make indoor comfort superb; but it 
is the life in the open air that makes a season 
at the hotel a panacea for the run down per- 
son and a delight in its wholesomeness for the 
hearty pleasure seeker. 

Within a few steps of the Gordon Arms is 
a substantial pleasure wharf with a conveni- 
ent landing float from which safe and easy 
transfer may be made to pleasure boats. And 
this is an ideal water for boating and yacht- 
ing, squalls being unknown and the 6ea so 
uniformly smooth that rowing in small boats 
is perfectly safe. The finest of fishing is to be 
had from off the wharf or in boats. 

The beach is a delight to the bather, espe- 
cially women and children, and the sands 
slope gradually with never a "hole"; there are 
no breakers and consequently no undertow, so 
that " learning to swim " is possible in the 
open sea. The absence of seaweed and other 
litter is also a pleasing advantage. A bath 
house in connection with the hotel affords 
every convenience for bathers. 

The beach is lighted by electricity at night 
and broad wooden walks make evening strolls 

delightful. Bicy- 
cling, riding and 
driving on the 
beach are next 
things to flying. 

Near by is dead 
Man's Island, an 
interesting pile of 
rocks with a his- 
tory, and across 
the bay it is but a 
short distance to 
the lighthouse and 
much wild scenery around Point Firmin 
Fine golf links have been laid out at consid- 
erable expense for the accommodation of 
guests. 

Any further information as to rates, etc., 
may be obtained by addressing S. P. Ander- 
son, manager, Terminal Island, Cal., or the 
Los Angeles office, at Tourist Information 
Bureau, 207 W. Third St. C. A. Hubert, agent. 




FRANK S. GORDON 



in the handling of the lands of Terminal Is- tern, the direction in which the residence sec- 
land. C. A. Sumner and Co., 134 South tion is tending, in particular, he has plated 
Broadway, and Edward D. Silent & Co., 212 and placed the Ahern Tract on the market. 

West Second St., 
are the agents 
for the property 
of the Terminal 
Land Company, 
and as such take 
an interest in 
the welfare of 
the place far 
greater than 
from a mere 
business stand- 
point. While 
this section is 
but one of the 
many they re- 
spectively repre- 
sent they infuse 

a degree of force into pushing, the intere-ts of This tract is located in what is commonly 
the Island that would credit the owners of a spoken of as the University district, and as 
property. See them for further information. tnat suburb, by recent vote of its residents, 

was lately formally taken into the fold and 
made a part of us the popularity which it had 




SOME THIRTY-EIGHTH STREET RESIDENCES IN AHERN TRACT 



A CHARMING RESIDENCE TRACT 



It is meet that due credit should be given 
the two Los Angeles real estate firms whose 
experience and prominence have done much 



OITUATED in the southwestern portion of alway8 Pn j„ ved aH a p]ace of fine home8 has 
<J the city in a region which, while it may been much enhanced. 

be termed a new part of Los Angeles as com- A car line> (he University extension of the 

Traction Company's line 
passes along the eastern 
boundary of the Ahern 
Tract, and one can t»ke 
the car at the corner of 
Third and Spring streets, 
their time for leaving 
that point being every 
seven minutes, and in 
a very short fifteen min- 
utes find himself at Mr. 
Ahern's office at 3215 
Vermont avenue near 
the corner of Thirty 
second street, on the eas- 
tern boundary of the 
tract. With rare fore- 
sight and a determina- 
tion to have his tract 
fully up to the require- 
ments of a fashionable 
residence section of a 
flourishing American 
city, Mr. Ahern has laid 
out and graded beautiful 
wide street and excellent 
cement sidewal ks, and 
to insure a desirable 
class of improvements 
stipulates in the deed to 
every lot or bunch of 
lots purchased that such 
residences as are to be 
erected on the same shall 
not fall below a mini- 
mum cost of $2500. 
While a number of fine 
houses have been erect- 
ed there recently it 
is Mr. A h e r 's inten- 
tion, within a very short time, to have dozen a 
or more new ones constructed. 

There are many features which render the 
Ahern Tract peculiarly adapted to the require- 
ments of the suburban home seeker. As has 
been before remarked in this article it is not 
only contiguous to the finest car line in the 
city but it possesses the richest soil suitable 
for raising all sorts of garden produce and 
attractive lawns, while the finest mountain 
water is piped throughout the tract. The 
glorious scenery of the Santa Monica foothills 
and Sierra Madre range of mountains from 
this section of the city cannot be surpassed. 




T. C. HECK 

The genial General Agent of the Passenger Department of the Terminal Railway Company 



pared with the older and more thickly settled 
neighborhoods, is the Ahern tract. 

Mr. W. J. Ahern the owner of this tract is 
a gentleman thoroughly alive to the interests 
of his city and a progressive, enterprising 
citizen. He is a pusher in every sense of the 
word and is one of those people who believe 
heartily in the full force of the meaning con- 
veyed by the expression, "we must now be up 
and doing," etc., etc. 

With an eye ever intent on the develop- 
ment of the city as a whole and the southwes- 



Western Graphic 



l.-. 



S, p* Creasinger 

ON" the evening of Thursday of last week 
one of the most entertaining receptions 
to the National Educational Association visi- 
tors was given by Mr. S. P. Creasinger in his 
well-appointed offices at 218 South Broadway. 
The hospitality manifested by the courteous 
and genial host on that occasion might well 
be regarded as an index to the ever cordial 
manner in which everyone alike is received 
by him at all times. Mr. Creasinger regarded 
the evening's reception simply as a duty to 
his city as a public-spirited citizen, and the 
hundreds who were in attendance pronounced 



for the interests of others who have relations 
with him mark the sterling qualities pos- 
sessed by him, and which are infused into 
the conduct of his affairs. 

Mr. Creasinger is a judicious 
advertiser, undoubtedly the 
largest in this commonwealth, 
and it is to printers' ink that he 
modestly attributes the up- 
building of his monumental suc- 
cess in the business and financial 
world. All credit, however, is 
unquestionably due to the mas- 
terful generalship exercised in 
the handling of the business he 
has so well in hand and to the 
fairness dealt to each and every 
patron. One never hears of 



supervision. There is a steady flow of people 
calling at his office throughout the day, quite 
after the manner of patrons of a bank, and it 




INTKKIOK OF PRIVATE OFFIC E 

The illu tration gives a very good view of one of the leading real estate offices of the 
rity, which is ratronized to its fullest capacity and is tested to its utmost every day 
Among the well-known real estate and "money to loan" men, Mr. Creasinger justly 
occupies a conspicuous place. No one who has lived in I.os Angeles for any length of time 
can have failed to notice the rapid success which has crowned Mr. (,'reasinger"s efforts. Hi., 
"den" takes rank us one of the most unic|iie and elegantly fitted up private offices in the 
city. It is inordinately expensive, showing the good taste and comfort consistent with the 
general characteristics of the owner, and impossihle to describe adequately, even in the 
excellent halt-tone above, which fails to reproduce the beautiful tones in coloring, which 
cannot fail to please and rest. — Lot Angeles Times, Jan. 1st, 1899. 



it a most charmingly conducted affair. There 
were many ladies and gentlemen assisting in 
receiving the constant incoming of guests. 
The flower and fern decorations, together with 
delightfully pleasing strains of music rendered 
by one of the city's best orchestras, and re- 
freshments on passing through the several 
beautiful offices, on the walls cf which hang 
rare paintings, brought forth exclamations of 
praise from the lips of the throng who were so 
grandly received. Every guest was presented 
with a souvenir. 

The occasion marked what a business man 
of Mr. Creasinger's extensive lines is capable 
of doing in the social scale, and the successful 
event characterized this man's private life. 

In financial and business circles generally 
he has become so well known throughout the 
United States that descriptive detail of his 
excellent character, methods and phenomen- 
ally successful business career is unnecessary 
in this writing. 

Mr. Creasinger is a keen and far-sighted 
business man, whose quick perception and 
shrewd judgment gainsay his remarkable 
achievements. That he is a man of his word 
is borne out in the numerous everyday deal- 
ings with those who enjoy commercial inter- 
course with him. His care and consideration 




AN I MBUEIXA TREE ON" ONE OF MR. CKEA^INGER'S RANCHES 



other than broad- 
gauged treatment at 
his hands and which 
is evinced on all sides 
of his dealings with 
those who come in 
contact with him. It 
is by reason of this 
character of dealing 
that Mr. Creasinger 
has had thrust upon 
him many of the 
greatest opportunities 
for profit to himself, 
because the people at 
home and abroad re- 
cognize that he is safe 
to deal with. 

The business offices 
are systematically 
conducted, with de- 
partments for the 



is generally known that many sound proposi- 
tions are carried to Mr. Creasinger for quick 
disposition which would require time and de- 
lay at other places. 

He has proved himself "the friend in need 
the friend indeed" to many business men, who 
themselves impart this intelligence, while Mr. 
Creasinger imparts nothing of others' affairs. 
It has been said that "confidence is the safe in 
which men often deposit rich treasures," and 
when this broad-minded capitalist is placing 
confidence in good people to mutual advan- 
tage, a confidence in him is engendered which 
has not been misplaced. 

With this man's accumulated wealth, own- 
ing more than fifty beautiful ranches in Cali- 
fornia and in nearly every Western State, 
besides extensive gold and copper mining in- 
terests, he contributes thousands of dollars to 
charitable and benevolent purposes. 

His frugality from boyhood should serve as 
an example for young men to follow. 

If you want to gain wholesome and bright 




orchard AND trick with KOB8SS 

A LBMON Ran< II Nkap. Covin*. Cai..— You will nee two heavy truck tenuis gathering a load of ISO boxes 
for the market: about 10,1100 pound') arc gathered monthly. Property of 8, P. Creasinger. 



various branches of business, and an able 
corps of intelligent men are employed who 
carry out instructions to the letter — the entire 
business being under Mr. Creasinger's personal 



business ideas, with profit to yourself, call 
upon or write to Mr. Creasinger, at his offices, 
218 South Broadway , and the result will please 
you. 



Western Graoliic 




Klbere Cool Breezes Blow 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 





SANTA MONICA 

'HEX papa leaves the hotel for the 
city in the morning with an extra 
collar in his coat pocket it is a sign 
that a big crowd will come down 
to escape the heat and closeness of the streets 
of the metropolis. Bathing is in its prime 
now and the crowd of early morning plungers 
is growing larger day by day. 

Notwithstanding that for many years the 
"center of the circumference" of Santa Monica 
has been at some neutral point between the 
North Beach Bath House and the Arcadia, 
the improvements and increasing popularity 
of Ocean Park have compelled us to move 
said geometrical point some distance south. 
Messrs. Kinney & Dudley are pushing their 
tract with vigor and we are proud to have 
them in the family. 

The Saturday evening hops at the Arcadia 
have become a Southern California fixture and 
a whole bunch of people think that the ride 
down on the electric, a dance or two, refresh- 
ments in the Grill room or at Kckert & Hopi's 
and back again on the last car is about the 
nicest way to spend a summer evening yet 
thought of. 

CORONADO 

AFTER visiting all the beauty spots in 
California Ian Maclaren thoughtfully 
remarked that "unto California much had 
been given and much would be expected of 
her in return." During the past few weeks 
the generosity of California has been pretty 
thoroughly tested and in not even the 
slightest degree found wanting or selfish. At 
least such is the verdict rendered by N.E.A. 
visitors and tourists, and as they are the lord 
high executioners in this case their opinion 
must stand. 

Since Los Angeles, San Diego, Coronado 
and Mexico have been the touring grounds of 
Eastern as well as California tourists. 

Guests at Hotel del Coronado of the early 
part of the week, who are recognized as 
crowned heads among the great educators of 
America, were Dr. Nicholas Murry Butler, 
dean of philosophy at Columbia University, 
New York City; Newton C. Dougherty, an 
ex-president of the N.E.A. and superintendent 
of public instruction at Peoria, 111.; Nicholas 
Murry, librarian at Johns-Hopkins Univer- 
sity; Dr. F. Louis Soldan of St. Louis; Prof. 
J. H. Phillips of Birmingham, Ala.; Wm. 
Dick of Philadelphia and President Baker 
of Colorado University at Boulder. 

J. A. Miner of Salt Lake City, accompanied 
by his daughter, is enjoying an extended stay 
at Hotel del Coronado. As justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Utah Mr. Miner has troubles 
of his own, and knows something of Mor- 
monism. 

Miss S. E. Sirwell of Minneapolis is the 
guest of Mrs. E. S. Babcock. 

Miss Edwards of St. Louis, Miss Baker of 
San Diego, also W. R. Staats of Pasadena and 
Mr. Van Winkle of San Rafael have been 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Graham E. Babcock 
at their beautiful Coronado home during the 
past week. 



Walter G. Smith of the San Francisco 
Chronicle staff and family are summering at 
their cottage on the beach. 

E. Oram Lyte, president of the N.E.A. 
during the past year, Mrs. Lyte and children, 
after a sojourn in Los Angeles, are registered 
at Hotel del Coronado. 

Secretary Irwin Shepard of the N.E.A., 
accompanied by his wife and sons, also Miss 
Elmer of Winona, Minn., will spend some 
time at Hotel del Coronado. 

Golf is the game that catches every lady 
this season. Let other sports be what they 
may, everyone plays it. The links at Hotel 
del Coronado are never lonesome. 

"The days may come and the days may 
go" but life is ever gay at Coronado. The 
greatest trouble is that the days go all too 
rapidly, reminding mortals that "time was 
made for slaves." 

REDONDO 

THE past week has been unusually gay 
at Redondo owing to the crowd of young 
people who have been at the hotel and have 
formed delightful house parties at the various 
cottages on account of the tennis tournament 
which opened here on the hotel courts Thurs- 
day. 

Every day large parties have come down 
from Los Angeles and Pasadena and the ball 
this evening promises to be one of the most 
elaborate functions of the summer. 

Golf has divided the honors with tennis 
and two very interesting tournaments were 
held this week, one Saturday and the other 
Wednesday. The Saturday entries were Mes- 
dames F. H. Seymour, H. R. Warner; MisseB 
Seymour, Waddell, Bean, Ella Bean, Perry, 
Palmer; Messrs. Pridham, Osburn, Anderson, 
Perry, Peters, Haskins and Norris. Miss Anne 
Bean carries off the ladies' prize with a score 
of 76, handicap 20; net score 56. Robert Os- 
burn, Riverside, won the men's prize; score 
SO, handicap 5; net score 84. The men made 
two rounds of the links, the ladies but one, 
but in Wednesday's tournament both made 
two rounds. This included the same players 
with the exception of the Misses Bean and the 
addition of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Dick, 
Miss Bumiller and Mr. Hallet. The prize 
winners in the second tournament were Mrs. 
H. R. Warner, score 120, handicap 20, net 
112; A. T. Anderson, score 104, handicap 16, 
net score 88; Miss Waddell and I. Anderson 
were second. 

The latter part of the week has been de- 
voted to tennis and the play has been brilliant 
and the success of the affair largely due to 
the efforts of R. A. Rowan of Los Angeles and 
Robert D. Osburn of Riverside. The entries 
include a number of crack Los Angeles players 
among whom are Clay Gooding, Wm. Nevin, 
Harry Bingham, Harold Bray, R. A. Rowan, 
Paul Rowan, Fritz Overton, Tro Hendricks, 
Milton Chadburn. 

Santa Monica is represented by L. L. 
Oliver and D. D. Acker; Pasadena by Miss 
Shoemaker, John Daggett and the Mipses Sut- 
ton; San Gabriel by Miss Gabriel Dobbins, 



Garvanza by Misses Orilla and Blanche Don- 
nell, Redondo by Mrs. F. H. Seymour and Miss 
Seymour, Riverside by Mr. Osburn. Among 
the ladies who entered is Miss Julia Taylor of 
Detroit, Mich. 

SANTA MONICA 



I Hotel Arcadia 



SANTA MONICA 

CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 
Knom 




The l'arlors 
All Look 
Toward tin Sea 

It seems to me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles blow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound, 
And I'd have stillness all mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's Bide, 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's sur-iy where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
But when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lots the best. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue, 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

—Eugene Kield, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 




t 

$ Frank A 

i ^ 



HOMES ? ce . an 
BY TflE SEfl — 

KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Elegant beach, Water pined to tract. 
Electric light connection. Long lease, JIO to 825 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever Offered to secure a santa 
Monica Home 

Ocean Air Ocean Beach Ocean Bathing 

L. B. OSBORN, Agent 

Office, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



' '<£7 V£7 -<S7 - 



Fine Fish 
Dinners 



No tourist considers a visit to California 
complete until he has visited Santa Monica and 
no one seeking a Summer Resort thinks of over- 
looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ex- 
tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, 
mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc . which are to be 
obtained at the famous rtstaurant, overlooking 
the ocean. 

THE PAVILION 

ECK'ERT & UOPF, Props. 



# 
w 



f 
w 



The North Beach 
Bath House 



Has perfected an arrangement by 
which the water in the plunge will be entirely 
changed daily. This year a great deal of money 
has been put into permanent improvements in 
and around the bath house and it will be the 
aim of the management to cater to the best class 
of people, by providing eyerj thing for their 
comfort and convenience We may say to our 
old patrons that they will hardly recognize the 
place on account of changes for the better. 



I OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST., I.os Angeles, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour from t>.30 a m to 7.30 
p.m., 8.30. 'J.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LEAVE HANI) STAND, Santa Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three quarter from 5.45 a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.45, 9.45, II 1 . 45. 



Western Graphic 



17 



R E DO N D O 




ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 
FROM LOS ANGELES 




* Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



* 

* 

* 
* 

J* 
s* 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 

Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn- 
aments. 

Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 

Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 



Transient Kates S3. 50 to 84. 



j, Special Weekly Hates 



H. R. WARNER, Prop. 



%%K««*«lt*llltll«llAftllll«4l<t(lltAAA*«JtA*««ft 




Santa Fe Route i 



Summer Time Table 

Daily Service 



Leaves Los Angeles 
Arrives at Kedondo 



9. ')5 a. m. 
In. 33 a. in. 



1.30 p. in. 
'.'.10 p. m. 



Sunday Sekvice 
Leaves Los Angeles 8.30 a.m. 9.55 a. m. 

1.30 p. m. 5.35 p. m. 
Arrives at Redo do 9.10a.m. 10.35a.m. 

2.10 p.m. 6.10 p.m. 
Last Train Returning Leaves Redondo 

Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



5.35 p. m. 
li 10 p. m. 



7 00 p. in. 

7 10 p. m. 
s.00 p.m. 



Los flnyeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4. 189JT © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Every day 9.30 am 1.30 p m 5.30 p m 
Sundays 8.10 a m 9.30 a in 10.45 a in 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 7.00 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for Los Angeles 

Everyday x.nn a m 11.00am 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a in 8.00 a m 9.30 a in . 

11.00 am 4.15 pm 5 45 pm T. 
9 Theater train Saturday night leaves Kedondo ti 30 p in J)J 
returning leaves Los Angelei 11.30 p m 4 

if Ciiy Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

| L.J. PERRY, Superintendent A 



BUNDY'S 



I 

I Elsinore 
■ 

2 
I 
t 
5 
5 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottngcs Lighted by Acety- 
lene 'ias. Only Hotel dl- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z 



Bates per week— 88, So, and 
lng Hot Sulphur Baths 
sumptives taken 



UNDY, Prop 

0, in chid 
No Con- 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 



I 

c 



H. B. Ainsworth left Thursday for a busi- 
ness trip to San Francisco. 

Mrs. Dan McFarland of Los Angeles has 
been entertaining a house part}' here this week 
as well as Mrs. J. W. Ridgeway, Mrs. M. L. 
Sargent and others who have had guests 
interested in tennis. 

Mrs. G. F. Granger and Miss Elizabeth 
Hubbard of Pasadena have taken a cottage 
on the bluff for the rest of the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. F. Taylor of Detroit, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Hickey and Mr. and Mrs. 
\V. F. Van Aylstine of Prescott, Ariz., are 
among this week's arrivals for the season. 

Among prominent Los Angeles people who 
are at the hotel for an extended stay are Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert F. Gay and son, Mrs. C. 
Bumiller Hickey, Misses Stella and Edna 
Bumiller. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Powers, well known 
society people ef Kansas City, are at Kedondo 
Hotel for several weeks. 

Dr. Alfred C. Crofton of Pasadena was 
among Wednesday's arrivals. Among Pasa- 
denans still at the hotel are Mr. and Mrs. F. 
C. Bolt and family, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Swan. 

CATALINA ISLAND 

NOT even a deaf, dumb and blind person 
could avoid catching the feeling of 
jollity that is even in the salt air here at 
Avalon. A chubby young matron boasted 
this week that she had reduced her weight 
over ten pounds through constant activity 
and is now anxiously awaiting the coming of 
a gripful of '97 summer gowns which she had 
thought were doomed to the rag bag. And 
you know clothes of any vintage are all right 
here, for people don't have to put on any 
more agony than they want to. 

The ball room of the Metropole was filled 
with hotel guests and campers Monday even- 
ing to enjoy a musicale given under the direc- 
tion of Hyman Meyer. It was a greatly 
enjoyed affair and the following men and 
women contributed numbers: Hyman Meyer, 
baritone solo; F. Smith, 'cello solo; Claude 
and Fred Gilbert, Quarrel Scene from "Julius 
Caesar;" Fred Scott Garrish, banjo solo; Mrs. 
M. C. Olcise, song; Miss Mabel McKenzie, 
violin solo; W. H. Leimert, prestidigitateur ; 
Dave Rosebrook, cornet solo; Hyman Meyer, 
coon song. 

An exciting fish story concerns J. H. 
Wood, Harry Elms and Frank W. Rider, who 
relieved each other for over fourteen hours 
playing a big tuna which finally broke the 
line and got away. Mr. Wood hooked the 
monster fish while out fishing with his wife 
and son. 

The United States Consul at Yokohama 
reports that clocks are manufactured in vari- 
ous parts of Japan to an extent that has near- 
ly driven out the foreign made article-". At 
Nagoya there are seven clock factories, the 
largest of which has an output of between 
7,000 and 8,000 time pieces a month. Kyoto 
produces 5,000 clocks monthly; Osaka, 5,00(1, 
and Tokyo has two manufactories which make 
5,000. He estimates that more than 30,000 
clocks are made in Japan each month. 
He adds: "Everything pertaining to a clock 
is made here, except the springs, which corre 
from America. Up to two years ago these 
springs were largely imported from (iermany, 
but since that time they have been imported 
from the United States on account of the 
superior quality and cheapness of price offered 



by our country." The Japanese clocks are 
as good, as low in price and as varied in style 
as those of American make. 



deliver us 

FROM tailors' bills, doctors' pills, sudden 
chills and other ills — deliver us. 

From want of gold, wives that scold, 
maidens old and widows bold — deliver us. 

From seedy coats, protested notes, illegal 
votes and sinking boats — deliver us. 

From modest girls, with waving curls and 
teeth like pearls — well, never mind. 

SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 



ftanta Gatailna island \ 

sff Three ami one-half hours from ■ .«»•* Angeles 

X The Greatest Resoxi 4> 

ir The Lotc' lest Season of the Year P 

Climate near Perfection • 
Phenomenal Pishing and Hunting 

The great Sta^e Ki<le % 

4 

mqpf.kn HOTEL 
Am »™ METROPOLE ! 



4 



Unique exclusive a* tractions 

The Famed Marine Gardens »*» viewed 

from the ul.i-- bottomed hoa h 

The host and most picturesque Golf Links 

Round t rip every day from LOS A ngeleH 
Sunday eXCUrslonSf three hours on the Island 
See B. EC. time tahlen 

For fell information, illustrated pamphles and 
rates apply to 



! 

4 



BANNING CO. ♦ 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles ^ 



Tel. M 3b 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE. GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, Galitornia 



hothlji st completed 
<$ Elegant Rooms and 



Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 

Hath house In connec- 

BatesfcStoM a Amy Sag Hon with hotel. Klnest >> 

Special rates on fH ' ac ' 1 R " d ' u r, f bathing °» <5 

application gAS ™ ast ;. ( '.°" ^ ,ks ' H"' 1 "; $ 
r * liiR. tishint:. I en miles of $ 

<S P flnflP.rSOn Sag fine roadway along beach \ 

f Man V'.kk || ...r bicycling. 

1 Th e Attractive Route 

To the Favorite Sea Side 
Resorts is the 



Los flmjeles Terminal Railway 




Terminal Island, BytheSea 
Catalina Island San Pedro 
Long Beach, 

Arc the favorite anil 
inoit delightful places 
and only a short ride from Los AiiKeles. wheic can be 
found the llnc-l Open s.-n I'.ul li in K . YbcIiIIiik mid 
Y lulling on the PielflC MMl 

Inforrnallon and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket 
Office. 214 So. Spring 8t., l-o* A ngeles 
S. H Hynks, (ien. M«r. T. c. I'ki K,<ii-ii.Agt I'm h. In \A 



18 



Western Graphic 




Amusements 



SOME things in the theatrical business 
have been a puzzle to me ever since 
the wheels first began to revolve in my 
think tank, especially on the vaudeville stage. 
It so frequently happens that some really 
clever person appears on the boards with a 
partner that appears to be good for little or 
nothing, unless it happens to be a woman, 
who sometimes looks pretty and by face and 
figure is entitled to half the salary. But this 
week the climax is reached at the Orpheum in 
the three Gardner brothers. One of them is 
a little fellow who sings fairly, dances very 
well, does the "drum-major act" brilliantly, 
and otherwise proves himself a versatile kid; 
while his big brothers show little talent and 



more filling the Los Angeles Theater with en- 
trancing and brilliant melody. It has been 
suggested that we arrest the whole out-fit on 
some trumped-up charge and make them 
work their fine out in Mignon, Lucia, Trova- 
tore, etc. But a more practical plan is sug- 
gested by the management of the theater, 
which is that the aforesaid enthusiasts keep 
coming to the show and bring their friends. 
The members of the company have not for- 
gotten how to sing during their northern tour 
and the pleasure of listening to their magnifi- 
cent voices is not a whit less than during 
their first engagement, even in familiar roles. 

I HAVE wondered that Tom Garrett has 
not fi'led a few columns this week with 
criticisms of the subsidized Kin Fung Yee 
company that has held forth at Hazard's 
pavilion. Aside from the fact that it is a dis- 
grace to be subsidized there is no doubt that 
Wun Lung displays a very faulty method in 
passing from head to chest tones. It may be 
that the celestial mummers' name suggests 





WRECK OF THE . N. E. A. EXCURSION TRAIN AT NEWMAN, CAL. 
Photo by Robert Farvis, who was a passenger on the wrecked train 



less energy for anything. Not a few patrons 
of the show this week have suggested that they 
should be ashamed of themselves. Of the 
other two new numbers on the bill, J. Morie 
has elaborated upon the feats of later-day 
jugglers and originated some novel tricks him- 
self. Housewives quiver with tremulous ap- 
prehension at the apparently reckless way 
in which he throws real china plates and 
water pitchers around in the air. 

ENTHUSIASTS on Italian opera now 
wish there was some way to hang onto 
the Lambardi Opera Company since it is once 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FI .1ST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July 24. 

lliiy«-» ami l.yt on. in the Farce Comedy "A Wise tiny." 

The KixfordH. Musical and Athletic: a positive novelty. 

Million and Shields, the Tragic Comedians. 

Mori*. Expert Juggler: different from all others. 

The Farrell a, best Colored Artists on the Vaudeville Stage. 

Tli« Three Gardner lir the », Comedy Musical Artists. 

Great American Hiograi>h — U. 3. Cruiser Raleigh, Dewey's 
Men from Manila. Ixive in the Cornfield. Going to the Hunt, 
the Hunt, Gould's Dogs. Start and Finish of the Suburban 
Handicap. Around the Big Course on the Manhattan Elevated 
Rai'road, What Happened to Jones, A Good Story. 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturdav and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



OS ANGELES THEATER 

' 0. M. WOOD . ) . 

— \ h. c. wyatt; l - e! ' sees 



Another Week 



f Famous Singers and I>elightfnl 

M tisic 



THE LP 1 

ITALIAN QRHN1& ©FElfl CSfilFuWiY 

MONDAY EVENING, JULY 24TH VERDI'S "ERNAN1" 

TUESDAY EVENING BELLINI'S "P PURITANI" 

WEDNESDAY EVG ROSSINI'S "BARBER OF SEVILLE" 

THURSDAY EVG VERDI'S "UN BAI LO IN MASCHERA" 

FRIDAY EVENING BELLINI'S "NORMA" 

SATURDAY MATINEE THOMAS'S "MIGNON" 

SATURDAY EVENING MARQUETTE'S "RUY BLAS" 

Competent Chorus— Kxcellent Orchestra- 
Magnificent Singers 
SeatB now on Sale Telephone Main 70 



the cause of his apparent ignorance of the 
true Italian school and Mr. Garrett consider- 
ately overlooks a point which must at least 
perforate his corduroy coat. Then Miss Hip 
Sing did not sing at all; but as she only ap- 
peared in a scene that was laid in about 8147 
B.C., it is obvious that it would be inconsis- 
tent for her to warble after the styles of Sos- 
tegni's and Rossi's. I would also point out 
to my versatile friend of the Record that the 
wind and brass were magnificently balanced 
in the orchestra, though not as cleverly as 
Morie handles plates at the Orpheum. 

Lambardi Opera Company— The Italian songbirds 
are again with us and the brilliant work done by 
them at their former visit is being repeated, if any- 
thing in a more pleasing and artistic manner. After 
learning the demands of the American public and 
singing to American audiences for a series of weeks 
they feel more at home and more at ease, knowing 
better how to please than when singing to southern 
American audiences and in the Republic of Mexico. 
The last three nights and matinee of this week has 
been a round of triumphs for the favorites who have 
returned in new roles, as well as a repetition of some 
in which we have seen them before With such 
singers as Signorinas Sostegni, Repetto, Barducci, 
Rossi, Pollettini, Uberto, Marchetti. etc., and Signors 
Russo, Badaracco, Ferrari, Petrovich, Bergami, Tra- 
vaglini, Bergami, Vizzardelli, Bugamelli, Rataggi, etc., 
and a competent chorus and orchestra, surely any 
music lover should be satisfied with any bills pre- 
sented since their return. Delighted with the suc- 
cesses of this week's business, arrangements have 
been completed in which an entire new series of 
opeias will be given for next week, opening Monday 
evening with Verdi's spirited tragic opera Ernani. 
On Thursday evening Bellini's opera, I' Puritani, 
will be given; Wednesday evening, Rossini's opera 
bouffe. The Barber of Seville; Thursday evening, 
Verdi's Un Ballo in Maschera; Friday evening, Bel- 
lini's serious opera, Norma; at the Saturday matinee, 
by request, Ambroise Thomas' charming opera com- 
ique, Mignon; Saturday evening will close this mem- 
orable week of opera by an elaborate production of 
Marquetti's tragic opera in four acts, Ruy Bias. 



Orpheum— The folks who believe that "to laugh 
is to grow fat" will find a splendid prescription ready 
for them in the new bill at the Orpheum next week. 

It is strictly a comedy program, built for laughing 



purposes, with just enough in the way of music and 
novelty to give zest to the menu. 

Hayes and Lytton, two great fun makers, are to 
present Geo. Cohan's cleverly written skit, "A Wise 
Guy;" the piece is said to be exceedingly funny and 
as Hayes and Lytton are known to be accomplished 
comedians, a tid bit may be expected. 

Other notable acts will be. The Rixfords, head to 
head balancers; Millian and Shields, tragic bur- 
lesquers; Gardner Bros , musical artists; The Far- 
rells' colored swells of the stage; Morie, the expert 
juggler; and the biograph with new views. 

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

PHYSICIANS AND SllKGEONS 



ELIZABETH A. F0LLANSBEE 

315 SO. BROADWAY 
Rooms : 332,331 Laughliu Building 



Office hours 8 to 9 a.m 
1 to 4 p. 2D 

Tel. Main 737 



JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN, 
Hours: H a.m. to 12 m., 1 to G p.m. 

H S. 0RME 

116 417 DOUGLAS BLDG 
Third and Spring Streets 



Tel. Main 9K 



Tels. 



(Office Main 680 
I Res. Main 300 



RESIDENCE 

245 N. BUNKER HILL 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 


Hours— 10-12 a.m. 




2-4 p.m. 


328-330 WILCOX BUILDINCJ 


Tel. Main 614 Resid 


ENCE: THE LOCKE 


DENTISTS 


D. CAVE 




LANKERSEIM BLOCK 


Tel. Main 1515 


126 West Third Street 





St, Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE. 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding: and Day College for 
Young - Men and Boys 

. .THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
1 mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

the Tall term Begins on monday, September 4tb 

For further information, send for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A. LINN, C. M. 



•••• s 



, .TEL MLTIHSR* - 

\ uu Seventh and Olive Sts., Los Angeles f 




EUROPEAN PLAN- 60 Rooms 
ELEGANT SUITS Rates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Pass the Doors 



Correspondence 
2 Promptly 
• Answered 



McGONEGAL 

Proprietor 



>•••• 



Western Graphic 



L8 



A PROFESSIONAL SHOPPER'S METHOD 

A LADY who does the buying for several 
families and assists others in their shop- 
ping expeditions, as a professional in this line j 
told us how she does it, in a short conversa- 
tion on that subject a few weeks ago. 

"Of course I read the advertisements in 
the daily papers — yes, in weekly as well as 
daily. I do not buy at any bargain sales and 
seldom pay any attention to special sales. I 
have made it a business to do the purchasing 
for several families for a long time, and I 
have learned a great deal about how to buy. 
Bargains, if they really are bargains, are 
usually auction goods, out of date stuff, shelf 
worn or for some reason not worth the price 
of new, up-to-date goods. Special sales are 
a delusion and the articles advertised are sel- 
dom what I want, and goods not actually 
needed are dear at any price. 

"When the family needs something of im- 
portance it is decided just what and the quan- 
tity, when after consultation with my clients 



personally or by mail I go to the business 
house that I know carries what is wanted, 
make the selections, order the goods and pay 
for them. 

"No, I do not accept any commission from 
the house I buy from; all discounts go to my 
clients, who pay me. I buy regularly from 
certain houses; for instance, I buy largely 
from the Coulter Dry Goods house and have 
done so for years. Why?— because from a 
long experience I have found they are entirely 
reliable, that their goods are sold at a reason- 
able profit to themselves and that they buy 
new, fresh, up to-date goods, the best for the 
money, and buying from the manufacturers 
they are enabled to sell at as low a price as 
the making of the material will warrant. Is 
not that fair? It is worth so much to produce 
an article, it is worth so much to place it on 
sale at retail, and who should think of doing 
better or who should want to do better? I 
bought goods over twenty years ago from 
Coulter's here in this city for myself and one 



other family. I am now buying and assisting 
to buy for just an even dozen families; and as 
I said before, in the lines carried by Coulter I 
buy almost entirely of them. I have always 
been satisfied and the family I first bought for 
is still one of my clients, and two of that 
family are heads of new homes and I shop 
for them. Oh! I'll tell you more some time. 
Just advise the women to let bargain counters 
alone." 

Johnny— Papa, why do they say smart 
people have long heads and level heads? 

Papa — I guesp it's because wheels are sel- 
dom found revolving in long or flat places. 




LADIES * j* 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Chemist 

«*J*Price 50 els 

North Main Street 



S*- "S*- !S ^ W >g. j £ J*. X- ^ 



WHOLESALE 

LUMBER 



$ 

/is 

* 
/is 

/is 
/♦s 
/is 

* 

/j\ Yards 
/IS 

/♦s 

- S" -s^ v/ ^c- "g- ^ "g- ^ * 



^ -C^.^-.^ 

CHAS. W1ER Jjjjj 
Manager 

$ 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LUMBER CO. 



i 
\»/ 

\i/ 

\i/ 



EAST SAN PEDRO, Cal 



General Offices 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Jjjj[ 

■ ^g- ^g- >g- >g- ^r- ^ ^ /£_ IjL. 

'• >C- >5- ^ 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa'e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Tkv Ckemk de Acacia 
Skin food. 2-24-226 W. Second St. 

Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
I-ager Beers on draught at all principal saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited. Phone >' 4i>8 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chafin & Fabricks 
stocks of Waltbam, Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re- 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
newspaper cuts— just anyhlng you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 

Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Bkoadway. 

House Cleaning 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, SI. .W day 
25c per hour. 868 S. Broadway. Geo. Tanabi 



Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazines 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115J^ N. Main St., Los Anoei.es 

Carriage Works 

A. I. LIKE 

Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repuiriug. New 
buggies, etc., made to order. 800-H02 "I. Spring 
and 801-TO3 H. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

.Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax- 
mlnster, Moquette (Carpets, Fine Bugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 641 South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Robt. Jordan 

Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Healing Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Thtrd St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 



Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

Are made at Plaza Photo Gallery at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
penses and can give you your money's worth. 
PI.AZA Gai.I.ERV, 513 N. Main. 

Real Estate 

•* Mil 3- tic finds tin* bargain* " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

I. ending It. ;il Kstalc Agents 



I lis West Fourth St. 



Los A v.i. u s 



Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped In Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halftone and photo-chronic 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New Hioii St. - - Los Anoei.es 



Veterinary Surgeon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital, 627 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1152. White 2131. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours: 9 to 12 M. 2 to 6 and 7 to g P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

40>£ s - SPRING St. • - Los Anoeles 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 

Wines 

TRY OUR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. free delivery 
Southern California Wine Co. 220 West 
1th sL,<lx)s Angeles. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from Jio.ooo to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper \'/ 2 , 5c a roll 

Gilts 7'/ 2 c " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shades 25c each 

WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main IOS5 



Oldest and Largest Bunk in Southern 

California 




/ibvi muiviiuiiiu 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HEI.LMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Caahlei 

O. HEIMANN Assistant Caahlei 



W. H. Perry 
O. W. Chllds 
J, F. Francis 



DIRECTORS 

C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

II W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



*»-Speelal Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent In its new fire and burRlar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring ami Temple St*. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

A PITA L STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUK President 

I. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-I'resldent 

B. V. DUQUK Cashier 

Imrkx'Torh — H. W. Hellman, Rasper Colin, It. 
W. 0"Melveny, L. Winter, (). T. Johnson, 
T. L. limine, L N. Van Nuys, W. O. KerckhofT, A. 
Haas 

Park Market 

CHAS. KKSTNK.lt, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone Hcd 1120 



■ 

: 
■ 
■ 




THE M'.W CUP CHALLENGER, SHAMROCK 

The immv cup cliallfMiger, Shamrock, wliich waa lannohed from Yarrow's yard at 
Blaokwall, BDglaild. recently, Inut a lc-nj;tli over all of 130 feet (i inches, length on water 
line i-!> feet II inches, heam 'J4 feet and draft 1!) feet 8 inches. Her sail spread « ill be 
over 13.600 souare feet. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"Itlookslust like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

u 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 



Spend the Summer 



AT 



San Diego a„ d 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



June 16 and 17 
July I and 2 



August 4 and 5 
September I and 2 



Rate $3.00-Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

I mini re of Santa Ke Route 'gent 20(1 South -pring Street (eor. Jud) Los Angeli- 



Gardening ™ 
Calif ornia * * 




W. S. LYON 



FREE 



For a limited time we will give 
one of these books with each 
new or renewed annual sub- 
scription to Western 
Graphic 
$2.00 a year 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
ZfloVpers In Southern 
California 

Written for tfiis Soif and Climate 
JQicefij Tffustrated 
Svery lover of J-fotvers sftoufd Have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

0E0. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) '"SSfiSSJS*- 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 



M 



F)M INTERS « 
UBLISHERS 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for ns to 
handle to your entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 
Tel. M. 1053 los angeles, cal. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



C<] SUCCESSOK TO P» 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 

701 South Main Street 

Electrical Repairing 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

an<i Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=Class Machine Work 

JOHN Q. TUFTS, J* 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo. Eice 4 Sons (Inc.) 311 31w N'w Hieh 8treet 




Los Angeles, Saturday, July 29, 1899. 




MISS LYELA EDELMAN 

Whose Engagement to Hugo Brandcls of Omaha. Nebraska, 
was announced this week 



Photo by Marceau 

Eng. by MausarJ -Collier Co. 



Western Graphic 



McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 





Mexican Drawn Work 

An exquisite collection of real hand-drawn work ; new and 
novel designs in dainty, spidery-like patterns. The prices are 
much less than you have ever found the same quality of work. 
It is a sample line, no two pieces alike, and is a chance of the 
passing hour. 

5 x 5 inch Hemstitched Doilies 35c 

6 x 6-inch Hemstitched Doilies 35c 

(> l A x 6j4-iuch Hemstitched Doilies 50c 

l l A x 7K - ' nc h Hemstitched Doilies $1 00 

8L£ x 8^-inch Hemstitched Doilies $1.25 

6x6 inch Fringed Doilies 50c and 75c 

8 x 8-inch Fringed Doilies 75c and 85c 

6-inch Round Doilies 

9'A x 9'2-inch Hemstitched Center Pieces $' -75 

io'.2 x 10^-inch Hemstitched Center Pieces f 1.25 

16 x 16-inch Hemstitched Center Pieces $4 50 

18 x 18-inch Hemstitched Center Pieces $5-50 

20 x 20 inch Hemstitched Center Pieces f5-Oo 

Sheer Linen Handkerchiefs, elaborately drawn, from $3.75 to £4.25 

California Blankets — just the thing lor campers and seaside cottagers, 
$2.95 a pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 

317=325 South Broadway Between Third and Fourth 




ODDEST SCHOOLHOUSE IN NEW YORK. 

, . a t '" ,e w '»en New York is adding several fine buildings to her school facilities 
this illustration is interesting. It is made from a photograph of the schoolhnuse on 
Barren Island, whit* became a part of the Greater New York at the time of the con- 
solidation. It is not quite up to the standard of the greater metropolis. Barren M:ui< 

« situated in Canarsie bay, about seven miles southeast of the city hill. 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311 313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los ANGELES, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice in Log Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 



r) Los /fnge/es 

<@U/)lH 



A 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



ROUND TRIP 



50c 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



J> Good Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



J> J- Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9.35 p.m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 




ROSE PURITY WATER 



212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses in Book-keeping, Shorthand. T\ pewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



L* A* Sulphur Springs TndBaths 



. 1»» for. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 

These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of y 
Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. $ 



. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER fr. ra Highland Glen, California. Tbe 
analysis of ROSE PC IUTY WATER shows it to contain the most healthful properties known fur 
Constipation, Indigestion and Kidney difficulties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use. It is nicely furnished in one and five-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all points of the 
city and towns through our agents. It is cool and clear as crystal as it runs from the Spring Rock 
Fountain head. It is not a dead water; its virtue for h'alth is Spirit, Life and Purity. 

If any person not knowing or using this water will visit us within 30 days, will be entitled 
to the extent of five gallons FREE, each party bringing his bottle. 

For orders address 



los \n<;eles, CAL. 
Tel. Sub Station lO 



LAMB & WHITNEY, 

PASADKNA AM) 4i»tli A* I.M KS 



A. PUISSEGUE, Proprietor 



MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 




444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91. 



~ .^N. ^JN. "T*~ *"p. • p. "7 s * - f- 



JoSEPH Maier, 
1' res aLd Tn as. 



GSOBGS Zobei.kin 
Vice-I'res. and Sec y 



HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier & Zobelein 

Brewery 



NOTICK OF FOKECLOSURKSALi; 

Sheriff's Sale, No. 32146. 

J. If. Elliott and H. T. I.ee, as Trusti es for 
Jessie I'. Church, plaintiffs, vs. Minnie S. Serrot, 
the said Minnie Serrot and .1. W. Gillette and VV. 
W. Widney as Ex t utors of the Will of Charles 
E. Serrot, deceased, Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 13th day of July, 
A.I)., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in J. M. Elliott, et al., the above named 
plaintiffs, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie S. Serrot, 
et al., defendants, on the 27th day of June, 
A.I). 1889, for tbe sum of Seventeen Htn dred 
and Fourteen and J0-10O Dollars, gold coin of the 
United States, which said decree was, on the 
30lh day ol June, A. D 1899, recorded 
In Judgment Book 85 of said Court, 
at page I, I am commanded to sell all that 
certain lot. piece, or parcel of land situate, 
lying and being in the county of Los Angeles, 
state of California, and bounded and described 



as follows: Lot Thirteen (13) of Hodgkiu'a Sub- 
division of Lot Eighty-s ven (87) and Eighty- 
eight (88) of Watt's Subdivision of part of the 
Rancho San Rafael, according to the map of 
said HodgkinN Subdivision, recorded in liook 
5, page 576 of the Miscellaneous Records of Los 
Angeles County, California. Together with Teu 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamore 
Canyon Water Company of San Rafael, Los 
Angeles County. California. 

Together with all and singular the tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, or in anywise appertaining. 

Public notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, 
tbe 8th day of August," A. D. 1899, at 12 o'clock 
M . of that day, in front of the Court House doot 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc., to the highest and best bidder, 
for casn, gold coin of the U. S. 

Dated this 13th day of July, 1899. 

W. A. UAMMEL 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

By STEPHEN ALDEN Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Scott, Plaintiff's Attorneys. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 5 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 29, 1899. 



Hdltion dc l uxe 
|0 Cents a Cop) 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEX. C. TRUMAN 



EDITOR 



TEN thousand additional endorsements of 
our Southern California hospitality and 
climate have been added to the already long 
list which has gone forth to tell of the most 
delightful land in the world. The thousands 
of N.E.A.'s will probably tell 
One Milllion their half million pupils in 
Good Opinions the schoolrooms all over the 
United States of ''when I was 
in California — ." The words of commenda- 
tion and praise will be carried home and dis- 
cussed at the fireside, and thus the rising 
generation will be educated as to the beauties 
and advantages of the wonderland, Southern 
California. 

The winter climate of this land of sun- 
shine has been fully endorsed by the travelers 
of the world who seek a refuge from the icy 
cold of the north; now our summer days will 
be praised as a haven to which to flee from 
the sultry, torrid weather of the East. Verily 
are there any other worlds, in the orbit of de- 
lightful health-giving climates, for us to cap- 
ture? 

What is your choice? Or will you go all of 
them? Bonds for this, bonds for that, and 
still there's more to follow. On August 22 you 
can vote — 

y z> V F° r or a t-' a ' D8 t high 
You Fay Your ^ 0o \ building bonds $220,000 
Money p or or a( , a j nB t general 

School bonds 200,000 

The next day, August 23, citizens will 
cast their ballots 

For or against city water bonds 2,090,000 

A grand total of $2,510,000 

After these, what? There are many improve- 
ments to be made in this city that are im- 
perative, that can not be made except by issue 
of bonds. The question is a serious one. 
Business men are becoming alarmed. Capital 
is asking if it is to be driven out of Los An- 
geles by excessive taxation. 

Schools are absolutely necessary and every- 
body certainly favors the proposition to edu- 
cate our children, and that requires school 
buildings, and there is no other way to provide 
them but to issue bonds. It seems that the 
School Board had a doubt as to the utility of 
a new high school building, by dividing the 
question, so that bonds to build general or 
grammar school buildings can he voted and 
the high school building defeated. It would 
seem that a high school education should be 
given all children who will avail themselves 
of it, but — this leads us into deep water. 
There is evidently two sides to the question of 
high school education, for it is being discussed 
by the people most earnestly. Again, the 
general system of education in our public 
schools comes in for a great deal of discussion 



and much criticism — a question, however, that 
does not enter into the issuance of bonds. 

After the school bonds, the greatest of all 
questions, the one that will bring out a full 
vote, is the water bonds. On this subject the 
Gnathic will take the side against bonds and 
will endeavor to fully elucidate its stand on 
the issue before election day. We have favored 
the coming together of the City Council and 
the Water Company people and see if they 
cannot agree on terms that will settle the 
question and thus avoid the tremendous ex- 
pense bill the city is now piling up against 
the taxpayers in accomplishing nothing. 

The resort to violence by the eastern street 
car strikers, even to the extreme of the des- 
truction of property by dynamite, is the ex- 
pected but appalling result of 
Eastern Street a disagreement between a cor- 
Car Strikes poration and its employees. 

Without entering into a dis- 
cussion of the right or wrong, or the mitigat- 
ing or untenable circumstances of the strikers' 
position, such lawlessness is a disgrace to the 
executive officers of the law and a state of 
anarchy that in a European country would 
be put down with irresistible force. There 
may be wrongs with the law but there are just 
as important rights under the law, and it is 
the sworn duty of the heads of government 
to uphold the wrong with the right, else there 
is no law. With evefy succeeding epidemic 
of strikes the local authorities, in whatever 
part of the country the trouble occurs, pursue 
the dilatory course of "waiting until the riot- 
ing is beyond their control" before asking 
state or federal assistance. It is during the 
interval between the end of municipal effici- 
ency and the appearance of a stronger pro- 
tector of the peace that lives and property are 
sacrificed to the indulgence of sympathy. 

Speaking from a private soldier's point of 
view is very much the same as from an offi- 
cer's standpoint when the commanding officer 
is criticized. The commander 
The Private of an army is usually gov- 
Soldicr's Point erned by the power at the 
of View capitol, and in this country, 

that means the President and 
his cabinet and "the power behind the throne" 
of which politics is chairman. 

The private soldier is often more capable 
to command his company than the commis- 
sioned officers, and the same might be said of 
his natural ability and bravery, in many 
instances being superior to the regimental 
officers. The are private; soldiers in the ranks 
who are as capable, with experience added, as 
the brigade commander. .Many instances are 
known (though they are not allowed to go on 
record) when in reality the brigade com- 
mander received his inspiration in time of 
battle from his orderly, who also carried the 
messages and gave the necessary commands to 
lead the brigade on to victory It was the 
bugler, who found himself alone in the thickest 
of the fight at San Juan, who was on the spot 
and could see the critical situation, who took 
it upon himself to sound the charge and thus 
saved the day. The private is nobody, is not 
supposed to even think, if we are to believe 



the talk of some brigadiers. Hut they are 
generally the boys who do the fighting. 
Should they have an opinion? Should they 
express it? There is a time for all things and 
the "high private of the rear rank" of the 
QRAPHIC believes that the boys returned from 
Manila have the right now to express the 
opinions they have had ground into them by 
experience. The consensus of their opinions 
of the general condition at Manila, whatever 
it is, is correct and history will prove it. 

Of course there is the croaker in the army 
as well as out of it, whose opinion is cheap 
and not worth the price, hut the verdict of 
the citizen soldier of America is final, as far 
as history is concerned. 

Like the evening sun, as it drops into a 
tropical sea, the life of Robert G. Ingersoll 
went out in the heighth of his glory. There 
was no cloud, no twilight; all 
The Death that was earthly of this man, 
oj a Man who towered above men, re- 

turned from whence it came 
Like a few his name will go down to time; 
like a tree his body returns to the elements; 
his soul —who knows. His whole life is mir- 
rorred in the following passage from his works, 
which was read at his funeral: 

"My religion —To love justice, to long for the 
right, to have mercy, to pity the suirering, to assist 
the weak, to forget wrongs and remember benefits, to 
love the truth, to be sincere, to utter honest words, to 
love liberty and wage a relentless war against slavery 
in all its forms, to love wife and child and friend, to 
make a happy home, to love the beautiful in art, in 
nature; to cultivate the mind, to be familiar with the 
mighty thoughts that genius has expressed, with the 
noble deeds of all tho world; to cultivate courage and 
cheerfulness, to make others happy; to till life with a 
splendor of generous acts, tho warmth of loving 
words; to discard error, to destroy prejudice, to re- 
ceive new truths with gladness, to cultivate hope, to 
see the calm before the storm and dawn beyond the 
night; to do tho best that can be done and then to bo 
resigned that is the religion of reason, tho croed of 
science; This satisfies tho brain and the heart." 

Ingersoll is dead. Long live Ingersoll 1 

On Wednesday morning the newspapers of 
the country contained a quarter-column tele- 
gram headed, in many instances, "Alger Bide 

Farewell." Now this has a 
Some Would tearful sound to those igno- 
Use Both Feet rant of his identity, but the 

feelings of every man, woman 
and child in Southern California toward the 
ex-secretary were very much as Frank Daniels 
expressed himself in "Little Puck"— "Oh, I'd 
like to give you a real good kick." 

The horror of the cold blooded murder of a 
young woman by a senile wretch old enough 
to be her father assails the sensibilities with 
an indescribable loathing for 
The Long the monster, who has all but 

Beach Tragedy succeeded in removing his of- 
fensive presence from the 
earth A civilized mind is not capable of en- 
tertaining a punishment adequate to the 
fiend ishness of the offense, and we can only 
extend sympathy to the girls parents, whose 
hearts are heavy with a most terrible sorrow. 

There is vindication for (i. .1. Griffith and 
confusion for the friends of R A. Bird in the 
jury's verdict again convicting him of forgery. 



4 



Western Graphic 








tf 


: ) 






1 





Observations of the Owl 



HEALTH Officer Powers wants the city 
to provide him with a bacteriological 
laboratory, which he says is essential to place 
the department on an equality with similar 
branches of the public service in other cities. 

Most of us who have had 
A Bug Depart- reason to know what has been 
ment Wanted done by Dr. Powers in the 
past year will agree that he 
ought to have almost anything he asks, though 
we can not accept the implication that the 
health department of Los Angeles is not al- 
ready equal to that of any other city. A 
bacteriological laboratory is where the expert 
microscopists find many new and unexpected 
things without traveling far in search of 
them. The bacteriologist finds and classifies 
the various microbes that prey upon man. 
That he does not at the same time discover 
how best to destroy the cocci is unfortunate, 
but time is yet young and all things are not 
learned in a day. Lest occasion should be 
given for a discussion on the actual value of 
the discovery of certain bacilli the technicali- 
ties of the subject will here be dropped. 

If a new bacteriological laboratory will 
assist the health officer in enforcing the law 
against the sale of impure and adulterated 
food it should be forthcoming instanter, but 
even a comparatively primitive assortment of 
microscopes, test tubes, lactometers and other 
kinds of meters can, by the expert, be made 
to discover the startling fact that purity in 
food products is now nearer the exception 
than the rule. That dairymen and restau- 
ranteurs and others every little while suffer 
arrest for dispensing milk that comes not up 
to requirements, proves only one thing, and 
that is that the ordinance is not actually a 
dead letter. 

One pernicious evil that the milk men may 
practice without fear of the law appears to be 
growing, unchecked. The use of preservatives 
in milk and cream is doing 
Danger in much toward the enrichment 

Embalmed Milk of dairymen, but it is causing 
a danger that gives no little 
concern to those physicians that really have 
at heart the best interests of their fellow men. 
The use of an antiseptic drug to keep milk 
from spoiling for a period of twenty-four to 
forty-eight hours makes the milk valueless as 
food, and to invalids and children the doc- 
tored lacteal lluid is positively dangerous. 
Milk that is drugged so it will not sour will 
not digest. Milk that will not digest can 
cause much mischief in the human stomach. 

A great hue and cry was long ago raised 
about "embalmed beef," and many who 
loaned their voices to public clamor were at 
the time using, and still use, "embalmed 
milk." That one preparation widely used in 
the preservation of milk is formalin, will not 
seem so surprising to those persons that have 
detected in their coffue the odor that became 
familiar to them during the recent visitation 
of smallpox. That formalin should be a good 
germicide and be efficacious in time of epi- 



demic is not proof that it is healthful to take 
with draughts of milk. Almost every milk- 
man in this city will admit that he uses some 
kind of preservative, and though all may not 
use the pungent disinfectant known to drug- 
gists as formaldehyde — otherwise formalin — 
he is nevertheless imperiling weak stomachs 
and young children with his "embalmed 
milk." 

Now no bacteriological laboratory is re- 
quired to discover the presence of preservative 
in milk. Any ordinary nose may smell it 
and most palates may taste it. The health 
officer knows of the practice and deplores it, 
but the men who dose the milk do not thereby 
violate the written law relating to murder. 



One example of how a deliberate body 
may sometimes be led astray by i;s impulse 
was presented by the city council, which came 

very near passing an ordi- 
// Would Have nance to prohibit the carrying 
Been a Hilly of young children upon the 
'riling to Do handle bars of bicycles Any 

legislation that is designed to 
protect life io commendable, but a city council 
that would essay to prohibit a father from 
carrying his child with him on a bicycle that 
was built for one might go further and estab- 
lish a penalty for taking the little one out for 
a buggy ride in a vehicle pulled by a horse or 
pushed by nurce or fond relative. No parent 
needs a law to keep him from endangering the 
life of his own offspring, though all require 
protection from the other fellow. Few par- 
ents take less interest in their own babies 
than the city fathers express for all infantile 
humanity within the corporate limits, and 
the man that chooses to take chances of 
calamity by carrying in proud display his 
child upon a bicycle handle bar should be 
permitted to take the chances, as he submits 
to the greatest risk. 

There is a delicattessen and meat market 
on Second street in the window of which is a 
Hebrew sign which presumably calls atten- 
tion to the Rabbi's seal on every cutlet and 
chop. A distinctly Irish pair were attracted 
by the odd looking characters, and after eye- 
ing the stems and tails for a moment Mrs. 
Mulligan inquired of her husband, "Can you 
read it, Mike?" Mike cocked his head to one 
side and with his eyebrows raised replied, 
"No o-o; but if I had me tlute I could play 
it." 



The N.E.A. delegates that went away last 
week will be sorry they did not stay to exper- 
ience that creepy sensation of "assisting" in 
an earthquake. Even a series 
The Eat Hi- of light temblors would have 
quakes too Late served to illustrate future 
for /he N.E.A. geography lessons in Eastern 
schools. To put a few thou- 
sand Eastern strangers "through" one of our 
so-called earthquakes and then defy the 
visitors to find any ruin in the seismic wake 
would be to cast confusion into the ranks of 
those persons that play with the word of awful 
import and seek to mitigate, by comparison, 
their own cyclones, tornadoes and blizzards 
that leave their trail of debris and death. 



The bicycle bell ordinance is another mat- 
ter. As it is open to discussion, and viewed 
from some standpoints, is ludicrous, and 
as people are competent to 
Rather be form their own conclusions 

Killed than from their respective positions 
Scared to Death as bicycle riders or as pedes- 
trians there is little to be 
said. That some persons get run down be- 
cause there is no warning bell and that others 
suffer in like manner because there is one to 
alarm and befuddle them, are arguments pro 
and con. 



The kissing bug can never hope to be as 
popular as the "kissing bee," for which so 
many us retain a pleasant memory. 

It is strange how a few warm days will 
stimulate business. During the last brief 
heated term the Owl tried to 
Weather for find a number of professional 
the Seaside men at their offices and was 
Bonifaces greeted by many little pla- 

carded notes on the door say- 
ing that Mr. So and so had an engagement 
elsewhere for the day. As "elsewhere" might 
mean any of the beaches the search ended 
right at the office. 

There is a pretty good story on half a 
dozen Pasadena men being kept dark with 
the usual success. It seems that on the morn- 
ing of the Fourth two or three congenial 
spirits met in Johnnie Wood's drug store, 
quite accidentally, and incidentally opened 
up a bottle or two of — seltz-r water — as an ap- 
propriate and innocent celebration of the day. 
The occasion was rendered especially auspi- 
cious by the presence of Will Leithead, who 
was not familiar with the vintage and who 
was down from Riverside for the day, and 
when Dr. H. J. Macomber dropped in he was 
easily persuaded to celebrate also. 

Festivities were at their height when with- 
out the slightest warning Dr. Harry drew out 
his revolver and began wildly shooting into 
the crowd. There was a general stampede, a 
crashing of bottles, and before five shots had 
been fired the agile proprietor of the drug 
store had scaled the light partition and 
dropped into safety on the other side. Leithead 
had escaped into the cellar while the others of 
the frolicsome party had taken refuge among 
the unwashed and messy bottles under the 
various counters and Macomber had posses- 
sion of the place. 

Opinions varied as to the cause of the out- 
break. The milk-raised Pasadena men never 
doubted that the seltzer water had gone to 
the doctor's head and intoxicated him, but 
Leithead (who spends a great deal of his time 
at San Berdoon) decided the excitable gentle- 
man had suddenly gone crazy and telephoned 
for Marshal Lacey, while H. H. Rose, with 
commendable zeal, rang up the fire depart- 
ment. 

The response from both quarters was 
prompt, but before help could be secured the 
practical joker had explained he waB only 
having a little fun with the boys with blank 
cartridges. 

Thereupon they set 'em up all around 
again, and it being plain seltzer even the 
genial marshal joined them, but the chief of 
the fire department ungraciously Baid he had 
plenty of water in his line of business and 
he'd go home and celebrate. Johnnie Wood, 
beginning to get into the spirit of the day, 



Western Graphic 



7 




In the Gay Life 

SOCIETY sleeves I see are having the 
proper droop. "Elbowing"' should now 
be played wittily in some form only I can't 
think of anything, and besides I do not like 
elbows. Does anybody? What elbows were 
made for I cannot think. Elbows hove spoiled 
more thon one graceful situation. Take Romeo 
and Juliet. Every Juliet I have ever seen 
(and that has been two) has spoiled the bal- 
cony scene with those horrid crooks half way 
down her arms. When Maude Adams was 
doing that 19th century school girl Juliet of 




Schumacher I'hoto 

MIS3 EDNA H. 



Mausard-Colllfr Bng 
BIRD-SOLO PIANISTE AND ACCOMPANIST 



hers lately in New York, those elbows she 
used nearly killed me. Why, I wonder, wasn't 
the balcony built lower down or Maude's an- 
atomy built higher up to let out some of that 
kink of 90 degrees? Hut then Maude was 
the rage just then among women especially, 
and what woman does not bow down to an 
angular another? But let those corners and 
all the rest of it be properly dimpled over and 
where would feline or rather feminine sym- 
pathy be? In this cise, however, poor Mau- 
die, who will have a gold statue of herself at 
Paris by her native state (I have forgotten 
which) "is so delicate you know. Has con- 
sumption. Can't live two years, the doctors 
say!" Oh, dear! 

Don't you like to hear people always talk- 
about where they have been and what they 
have seen. I do. Especially when it is all 
about clothes— especially society's clothes. 
What a comfort it is that in all pne's trials 



and tribulations, as long as there are clothes 
to think of, there is still something to live for! 
Now speaking of Maude, the theater and New 
York, reminds me of how beautifully women 
do dress in the east when they go out to 
places of amusement in the evening. Take 
even plain old Philadelphia! There was one 
evening when Nordica.Kmma Eames and two 
or three men (it does not matter about their 
names) were singing in the Academy of Music. 
The first balcony in the Academy, you know, 
has just recently been converted, English 
fashion, into one immense circle of private 
boxes, and how perfectly stunning the house 
did look, the women in perfect evening dress 
with their white fur cloaks thrown back over 
their chairs, looking like some mythological 
characters rising out of great sea shells. 

Then the dressing was not con- 
fined to those particular boxes. 
The whole house to the roof 
was in special attire, even the 
woman who felt happy to listen 
to the divine music notwith- 
standing a seat on the stairs, 
finding it incumbent upon her- 
self to appear in a fancy silk 
waist and proper evening gloves. 

Now in Los Angeles, as a rule 
any old shirt waist will do, and 
to appear in a boxwith a veil 
tucked under the chin and a shop- 
ping parcel in hand is quite per- 
missible. 

Preserve us! There are, how- 
ever, small cliques of society 
here who appear at the theater 
properly clothed and in their 
right minds. While they have 
not the courage, it seems, to 
appear in "full" evening dress, 
yet their gowning is of the most 
elegant and fashionable descrip- 
tion and they are truly a god- 
send in the relief they furnish 
to the general appearance. There 
have been a number of evenings 
at the theaters lately when the 
boxes have been enlivened by 
parties with such leaders of up- 
to-date gowning as Mrs. Childs^ 
Mrs. Wilbur Parker, Mrs. Wm. 
Garland and the two Miss Win- 
stons, who always seem to me 
the most correctly dressed young 
ladies in Los Angeles. 

Catalina will soon have its 
innings. August usually sees 
this unique resort full of people and full of 
entertainments. 

Governor Gage and family spent a few 
days there last week, quietly it is true, but 
finding plenty of enjoyment within the con- 
fines of their party which included Mr. and 
Mrs. George Denis, Mrs. Wells and Dr. E. A. 
Bryant. 

The McCreas are, as usual, summering at 
Catalina, which means an overflowing homo 
party at "The Tycoon," their island home, 
most of the time. Dr and Mrs. S. S. Salis- 
bury who always take their children to Cata- 
lina for their vacation went over last Wednes- 
day, the doctor to remain two or three weeks. 

It looks as though Redondo had all the 
young folks the past week — raison d'etre — 
the ball. I see Miss Overton is quite in the 
thick of it down there and presume she has 
stepped back into the niche she left when she 
departed six months ago for that Mexican and 



eastern and what-not trip. Now Miss Over- 
ton was always a favorite. She is clever 
"smart" and her dark eyes can be everything, 
therefore anyone might be pardoned for won- 
dering whether the "niche'' included tho very 
handsome and very gallant young churchman 
of St. Paul's who saw a great deal of sweldom 
by her side last year — in fact, so much — that 
is to say, so much by her side that society 
smiled — approval, of course. 

Mrs. R. Garner Curran of 1659 West Elev- 
enth street entertained at luncheon Wednes- 
day in honor of Mrs. Robert W. King of Chi- 
cago. The dining room was decorated in pink 
carnations and maidenhair ferns Before re- 
turning home Mrs. King will visit Mrs. Pey- 
ton Smith in San Francisco. 

Mrs. C.Charles Travcrs was the hostess of 
a reception given Monday evening at her 
home on Downey avenue, Miss Anna Bragg 
being the guest of honor. The house was 
most artistically decorated throughout with 
flowers and foliage and the piazza was made 
inviting by divans and growing plants. Danc- 
ing was enjoyed and later there came an in- 
formal musical program. Piano solo, Miss 
Jessie Richie; Miss Frances Aylesworih played 
Moszkowski's Serenade on the violin. Mis. 
Grace Henderson Mathewson sang some selec- 
tions from Aida and the "Arditi Waltz,'' and 
the hostess sang the "Gypsy Song" from Car- 
men. B. Harwood Travers presided at the 
piano. Miss Brag left Tuesday morning for 
San Francisco, and after a short stay there 
she will return to her home in the east. 

Thursday evening a pretty wedding occur- 
red at 758 Wall street, when Miss Bessie Bed- 
ford was made Mrs. Charles F. Luken. Mr. 
Luken is an employee of the Wkstkhn 
Graphic and the best wishes of a score of as- 
sociates go with his bride and himself in their 
new happiness. 

The banquet given Father Adam on Thurs- 
day evening at IJJich's by the Newman Club 
was an event as heartfelt as it was convivi 1, 
and was replete with incidents of wisdom and 
good cheer. No divine that has ever lived in 
California carries away with him fo many 
excellent characteristics and such a registry of 
sublime church work as the distinguished 
guest, who for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury has been a radiant chieftain in all the 
duties entrusted him. The mould in which 
he was made has been destroyed. 

Melba is not coming to the United States 
next season. She will visit South America. 
She is now singing in London and will appear 
in Russia and Germany before the South 
American season. We shall greet her again 
in 1900. 

M I S C ELLANEOUS 



A. M. 



E I) E L M A N 

ARCH1TKI > 

Removed to HI, ANC'IIARD 110810 BALL BI II.DINO 
I,o«t AngcleM, Cal. Telephone. Heil 1841 

G. X. D O H I N S~7) X 

111! \ M ITIC TH \ I S I N<. 

\ ou r. Mid I'M vsn \ i. 01 iii R i 

Studio .Vjfi S Hprinu Apply by leller or b twee" hour* of 10-l'JM 



\ Vcvety 



is n 

"ftard Man" 
\ TZo Match 



Competent j(ud$e» say 
the Banie of the 



F)ardman piano 



SOl.K A (I.. NTS 



LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY 

Phone Green 1444 313 S. Broadway. 



8 



Western Graphic 




Sketches in the Philippines 

Impressions and Observations Gained During the 
Busy Life of a Campaigner 

WHILE the following letter was written 
some seven weeks since, there is much 
interest in the plain statements of a soldier 
boy, unvarnished by a journalist: 

Though we are now located at Quiugua, I 
will tell you of the Filipino congress building 
at Malolos before describing the beautiful 
town of Quingua. The cap- 
The Filipino itol or congress building is 
Capitol about centrally situated in 

Malolos. It is a large church 
with yellow and white front, converted into a 
large assembly room, with little to suggest its 
original significance. It was decorated with 
wreaths and chains made of flowers and vinep. 
High up and near the ceiling were the names 
of the member* of congress painted on white 
card in gilded letters. The name of Jose 
Rizal, the Filipino patriot, who died at the 
hands of the Spaniards on the Lunetta, occu- 
pies an honorary position. The floor is of 
polished inlaid stone. At the entrance is a 
large heap of six and eight inch shells, ren- 
dered ineffective by withdrawing the charges 
and explosives. Of course the president's 
desk, secretary's chair, etc., were not there, 
although the benches were. Seeing these 
things one cannot help thinking them sincere 
and we would doubtless call them patriots but 
for the fact that the name insurrectionists 
sounds better at this time. 

We now come to Quingua. Of all places we 
have yet been in this is the most picturesque. 
The town is orderly, contains many substan- 
tial houses and has a massive 
Picturesque cathedral which at present 
Quingua serves as our quarters. We 

came here only a few days ago, 
relieving Company M of the Twenty-second In- 
fantry, the regiment taking a new position at 
Baliwag. All was reported quiet and we have 
had peaceable times since our arrival. 

Our detachment numbers fifty men of H 
Battery, under Lieutenant Boutelle. The re- 
mainder of the battery is still camped beside 
the railroad track at Malolos. Battery L is 
quartered in the congress building, K in the 
open field, and G is still at Calumpit guard- 
ing the bridge there. Duty is not hard, and 
with commodious quarters this part of the 
army at least is once more reconciled to sol- 
dier life. 

The inhabitants of this place appear to be 
an industrious and thrifty folk. Business is 
becoming somewhat awakened. Many fami- 
lies have returned, and to judge from the nu- 
merous burials of little children here, it seems 
that exposure to all conditions of weather and 
insufficient nourishment have taxed the 
strength of the little ones beyond endurance. 
We find in a number of homes such a luxury 
as a piano, but the performers have room for 
improvement. 

The cathedral is the finest I have seen out- 
side of Manila. The main hall is fully two 
hundred feet long and fifty feet wide. The 

altar and interior of the 
The Cathedral building are finished so they 
of Quingua quite resemble marble, with 

gold trimmings. The same 
is true of the pulpit. The chandeliers are of 
pretty design, the cut glass and silvery spheres 



being in harmony with the splendor of the 
interior. The convent, a spacious two-story 
building, forms the right wing. The apart- 
ments are in part elegantly finished. 

The Rio Quingua flowing through here is 
a fine stream. The current is swift and water 
clear. It is used for domestic purposes. The 
tree-lined banks and bluffs afford beautiful 
landscapes, and as far as the eye can reach 
the dense vegetation bespeaks the fertility of 
the soil. Bathing once a day in this stream 
is keenly enjoyed. 

The agricultural outlook is also at its best 
here. In nearly all the fields we see the 
natives bucy cultivating cane, planting corn, 
harvesting their sweet pota- 
Native Tillers toes, or tilling the soil prepar- 
of the Soil atory to planting a new crop. 

Rice is ripening. Fruit is 
being gathered and laid away to ripen; bana- 
nas and mangos are some of the fruits treated 
this way. In the harvest field the entire 
family often helps papa. Crops may be seen 
in all stages. Corn may be just coming up or 
ready to harvest. The fruit trees may have 
both blossoms and ripe fruit. This may sound 
as though a tree did not have common sense. 
Coffee bushes are often seen and they are well 
laden with fruit. One may find berries of 
various kinds but the flavor is not good. 

With our modern facilities for transporta- 
tion and tilling the soil, one cannot help 
feeling that the crude methods tax a man's 
patience and require his strength to a much 
greater degree, with far smaller results, than 
we are accustomed to. When the Filipinos 
are awakened to this fact we will have a good 
market here. One thing worth a passing 
notice is the tandem water buffalo teams 
attached to heavily laden carts with wheels of 
solid wood, only a little opening being made 
to admit the axle. 

I have not yet seen growing hemp and 
tobacco. The interior doubtless contains many 
novelties. GEORGE oden 

Volcano at the Coming Exposition 

There will be innumerable interesting novel- 
ties at the Paris exposition. One of the most 
popular wi'l undoubtedly be the artificial vol- 
cano. Few people are lucky enough to see a 
real volcano in action and will welcome the 
chance to view its counterfeit. It will be 
built, says the Scientific American, at Grenelle 
on the banks of the Seine; will be 3'28 feet 
high and 485 feet in diameter. From the 
figures one sees that it will be in reality a 
small mountain visitors will have the privi- 
lege of climbing. 

The sides of the mountain will be provided 
with shady roadways and footpaths, so as to 
make the trip to the top very agreeable. The 
framework of the volcano will require no less 
than 18,000,000 pounds of iron and steel, and 
the earth that covers it will be real turf. A 
roadway twenty-five feet wide will wind 
spirally up a level of 240 feet, and will be dec- 
orated with climbing plants, bowers and trees. 
One hundred and twenty feet from the bottom 
there will be a circular platform, 1000 feet in 
circumference, called the "Alley of the Twen- 
tieth Century." 

Vegetation will be arranged upward from 
the bottom so that visitors will pass from the 
flora of the Mediterranean to the stunted 
shrubs usually found at the craters of vol- 
canos. Paths will lead to various restau- 
rants and concert halls and there will also 
be a reproduction of Dante's "Inferno." 

In the evening the summit will always be 
surmounted with a cloud of smoke, three erup- 
tions will take place at fixed hours and an 
imitation lava flow will prove interesting. 



frou-frou's Chat 

Of the fads and fashions of Both Sexes 

ONE ofien grows tired and ashamed of the 
perpetual vaunting of woman's "emer- 
gence" and "emancipation" by numerous re- 
formers of the present day, and it is this 
disgust which prompts the following remarks. 

It is the common boast of the 
The Ne~u> modern woman, or perhaps I 

Woman is might say muscular reformer, 

Overdoing that now for the first time 
we are women, free to use 
our long down-trampled powers, free to 
come and go and compete in many ways with 
the sterner sex; but if the truth were only 
known we are in no way nobler, finer or more 
suited to the sphere of woman than the 
women who have gone before us quietly and 
honorably fulfilling their share of toil and 
suffering, their meed of pain, in the struggle 
which has brought us to the present stage 
of progress. 

Woman in her highest uses and essentials 
is unintelligible to the muscular reformer, and 
for this reason I contend that the muscular 
reformer must be rejected as a guide to 
women. It is the delight of exerting these 
powers that has been the cause of the present 
degeneration in women. 

This may sound a litlle ambiguous to my 
reader, but if you have ever noticed the poor 
little knock-kneed, degenerate creatures whom 
mothers make spectacles of daily and stop to 
think that without doubt that mother is one 
of our outdoor, robust, handsome, muscular 
persons, who is an adept with her tennis 
racquet, a zealous cyclist and an all-round 
"good fellow." I don't mean that it neces- 
sarily follows that the offspring of every 
athletic woman is knock-kneed or cross eyed, 
but in tvery case it is inferior, if not physi- 
cally, certainly in mental quality and human 
charm to my womanly woman's babe. It 
seems that the prevailing ambition of the 
muscular reformer is to do things that men 
do, whereas her true value lies in doing things 
which men cannot do. The woman who has 
assumed or cultivated the masculine variation 
may be a very useful member of society but 
as a human creature she is a failure, and al- 
though it may seem more appropriate for fic- 
tion than a serious article, it is true that it is 
the ambition of every womanly woman to be 
the inspiration of some man's soul, and to be 
the mother of the offspring of that inspiration 
is the highest goal. But the excellent good 
fellow, though her mate may be deservedly 
attached to her, will never sound the highest 
keynote of his nature or fan into flame the 
soul and chivalry and finer tenderness whereof 
the most apparently commonplace man may 
be capable. 

If we watch the development thwarted by 
athletics in women we will surely find, not re- 
generation as some of us suppose, but degen- 
eration. Instead of physical enrichment there 
is physical impoverishment. She loses the 
charm of girlhood without gaining the natural 
charm of womanhood; she becomes instead 
muscular, coarse, stout, and altogether it is 
this type which is increasing so rapidly 
among our modern women. 

The clamoring reformer has for the most 
part done no more than set obstacles in our 
way, the obstacles of ridicule and hostility 
consequent upon her methods, and if we fol- 



low in her footsteps, instead of cherishing our 
womanliness and nobler attributes as our very 
highest possibilities, we may do all that prog- 
ress and the nobler women who have gone be- 
fore us have achieved. 



"How the common people kill fads in 
Hungary" is the heading of a very interest- 
ing article I ran across somewhere not long 

ago, and I just thought if it 
The Fallacy had only been "How fads are 
of Fads killed in Los Angeles." Most 

fads are, in truth, expen- 
sive and are intended for the gratifica- 
tion of their ultra fashionable origina- 
tors. But in this day of cheap and 
shoddy imitation nothing short of steam 
yacht, private race course and automobile 
fads will save the pleasure of their indulgence 
to the people of wealth. Beauty pins were 
first very dainty affairs of solid gold set with 
diamond chips, etc , but now their imitations 
can be had for six for a quarter and are an 
article of common utility. Likewise the pom- 
padour comb, which was originally seen on 
state occasions worn by a few who had five or 
ten dollars to indulge their fancy with; and 
now every servant and shop girl has one. 

The article referred to described how cer- 
tain ladies in Hungary adopted the habit of 
taking to the theatre huge plush bags of loud 
colors, in which they carried all their miscel- 
laneous belongings, such as opera glasses, 
gloves, handkerchiefs, smelling bottles and 
sweetmeats. These bags they were accustomed 
to hang over the ledge of the dress circle, with 
a picturesque and not wholly unpleasing ef- 
fect. 

The fashion spread among the lower classes 
and soon every servant girl in the street ap- 
peared with a plush bag in her hand. 

A short time ago the officers of a regiment 
quartered in the town for several successive 
nights bought up all the front seats in the 
dress circle and turned up at the performance 
carrying on their arms an ordinary forage 
bag, which they slung over the ledge in imita- 
tion of the ladies. 

The joke created no little amusement, and 
roars of laughter shook the house when the 
officers produced from their bags opera 
glasses, sweets, handkerchiefs, and here and 
there a tobacco pouch or a snuff box. Since 
then the plush bags have disappeared from 
the horizon. 



Another convulsion of saintliness has 
struck San Francisco and a late superior 
court decision has stirred up public opinion 
on gambling to an extent that the future 
promises to add the thousands of slot ma- 
chines of the windy city to those from Los 
Angeles that have found floor space at pleasure 
resorts and country stores. 

A banker to foot the bills, a judge to censor 
the bear stories and three physicians to pre- 
scribe proper doses of snake medicine is cer- 
tainly an ideal crowd for a month's hunting 
trip. They left last Sunday for Oregon 
where they will visit the Cascades, Crater 
Lake, Diamond Lake and Pellican Bay, and 
their names are Doctors W. W. Hitchcock, M. 
L. Moore, E. R. Smith, Judge R. H. F. Variel 
and J. J. Fay. 

Peoria's lodge of the Modern Woodmen 
of America has put a ban on duck trousers 
as a part of the marching uniform. No par- 
ticular reason is given, but it is presumed 
that such garments make the men webfooted. 



Western Graphic 





CQberc Cool Breezes Blow 



VV«VVVVVV¥VVV¥¥VVV 



SANTA MONICA 

HE WHO is not a golf player is indeed a 
lonesome individual nowadays, for 
with the informal weekly tournaments, the 
projected organization of a Southern Califor- 
nia Golf Club Association this week, and the 
Santa Monica club tournament on Friday and 
Saturday the air is redolent with Scotch. 
Messrs. J. F. Sartori of Los Angeles and C. E. 
Maud of Riverside are the gentlemen most 
actively intereFted in the formation of an as- 
sociation and it is expected that by the time 
this issue of WESTERN GRAPHIC is in the mails 
the cementing of the interests of golfers will 
have been effected. 

The Santa Monica club links on Nevada 
avenue are in fine condition for the play, and 
today (Saturday) will be one of the biggest 
days for golf since the first stick was flour- 
ished in the county. 

Things will change in a few weeks in favor 
of tennis, for on August 14th begins the asso- 
ciation tournament at the Casino courts, and 
already the bizarre costumes of the golfers 
are. decimated with the more pleasing flannels 
of the racquet wielders. 

The first heat of the swimming race takes 
place next Sunday afternoon, and it is ex- 
pected that several new swimmers will make 
the event very interesting for past champions. 

Last Saturday afternoon some two score 
golfers and their friends assembled at the 
Ocean Park links for a sociable game, after 
which Mrs. G. L. Waring served tea and 
Mmes. Abbot Kinney and T. H. Dudley dis- 
tributed prizes to the winners in the play, 
Mrs. Waring and Messrs. M. G. Burmesterand 
W. H. Young. 

Major Ben C. Truman returned Saturday 
from San Francisco where he was attending 
another meeting of the Paris Commissioners. 
Miss Georgia Truman accompanied him. 

Among other Angelenos who are here for a 
season are William Bosbyshell and family, 
who occupy one of their cottages on South 
Ocean avenve, and L. H. Carpenter and fam- 
ily who are domiciled in the Pastime cottage 
at Ocean Park. 

People used to call croquet an old maid's 
game, but here in Santa Monica it became 
necessary to have some relaxation from the 
everlasting round of golf so the old-fash- 
ioned game with mallets and wooden balls 
was seized upon and the Santa Monica Cro- 
quet Club is the result. It fills the bill and 
besides provides opportunities for delightful 
social afternoons in garden dress. Tuesday 
the weekly gathering took place on the beauti- 
ful lawn of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Robertson 
on Nevada avenue, corner Third. Mrs. T. II. 
Dudley was the hostess and poured tea. 

A jolly party of Pasadenans, properly 
chaperoned, enjoyed R trolley party Monday 
evening. After sniffing the salt air on the 
beach for an hour they indulged in a fish din- 
ner at the Arcadia grill. 

Among the season's guests at Hotel Arcadia 
are Prof. Ferguson and family of Pomona 
College, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M. Haskell, he 
the editor of the Pomona Progress; Mrs S. R. 



Hemingway, Redlands; Mr. and Mrs. K. P. 
Clark, Riverside. It is a great week for 
editors, Mr. Clark being an editor of the 
Riverside Press. 

SANTA MONICA 



Hotel Arcadia 




SANTA MONICA 
CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 

Knom 
The Dining 

Iloom 
The Parlors 
All Look 
Toward tha Sea 

It seems to me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles blow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound. 
And I'd have stillness all mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 1 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's surely where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren'l for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
Hut when it comes to getting rest 
I like the Country lots the best. 
Sometimes It seems to me I must 
.lust quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue, 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

— Eugeue Held, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 



Frank A. 

Trop. 




HOMES 

BY THE SE>fl 



Ocean 
Psrk 



KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Klegant beach, Water piped to tract. 
1- lectrlC light connection. Long lease, #10 to S25 
yearly rental 

The Rest Opportunity Kver Offered to secure a !-anln 
Monica Home 

Ocean Air Ocean Beach Ocean Bathiiuj 

L. B. OSBORN, Agent 

OfHcc, terminus Klectric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



% Fine Fish 
W Dinners < 

•A. No tourist considers a visit to California 

complete until he has visited Santa Monica and \ 

kK'/i no one seeking a Summer Kcsorl thinks of over- . 

WW looking Santa Monica. For far ami wide has ex- \ 

tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, . 

WW mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc.. which are to be \ 

r - a • obtained at the famous ri slaiirant, overlooking . 

the ocean. \ 

J THE PAVILION ^ 

(fife KCKKRT & HOI'F, Props 

f Championship Swimming Race 
- at Santa Monica 

A half-mile race in the open ocean, for good 
purses. Hest two in three heats, l'irst heat Sun- 
day, July 30, 1 p m. Tbe course may he seen 
from the verandahs of the North Bc.tch tt.ttb 
TlouiMT. The plunge is emptied and cleaned 
thoroughly every night. The water is kept at 
H2 degrees. The beach is at all times clean. 
<|tiiet and orderly, and has more permanent 
attractions than any other resort. K very bod v 
is remarking the great improvement over all 
preceding years. 



10 



Western Graphic 



The continual round of events at the Ar- 
cadia this week has kept the guests busy. 
Tuesday evening Mrs. E. M. Ross was score 
keeper at progressive whist in which Miss 
Rose Hardenburg, 29, and Dr. Cunningham, 
36, were leaders. 

Wednesday evening Mrs. J. C. Drake sur- 
prised her husband with a birthday dinner. 
Pretty decorations and a delightful menu 
were in harmony with the jolly party the 
wife had bidden: Mrs. A. C. Miner, Lieut, 
and Mrs. Randolph Miner, Miss Margaret 
Winston, Prof. Von Neumayer and Miss 
Daphne Drake. 

Miss Whitlock of Altadena, who is on the 
eve of returning to England, entertained with 
a dinner in her apartments the same evening, 
the guests being Mrs. S. F. Lowther, Miss 
Hugus, Miss Annetta Hugus, Messrs. Hugus, 
Neff and Harris. 

The juvenile cake walk Wednesday even- 
ing was pronounced the success of the season, 
the little folks being perfectly fascinating in 
their fancy costumes. Margaret Woollacott 
was dressed in brown overalls as a boy and 
with Clarice Stevens won the cake. The 
other misses and masters were Tilly Baruch, 
Violet Whitlark, Dalphne Drake, Evan Kabn, 
Newton Todd. Jack Whitlark, Chamblis Low- 
ther, Alexander Lowther, Gale Larkin, James 
Woollacott. 

Thursday afternoon Mrs. Noble, a palmist 
of national reputation and a pupil of Cheiro, 
gave a lecture and reading in the parlors. 

Friday evening the Los Angeles Ladies' 
Quartette, conducted by Madam Crawford, 
charmed the guests with some choice selections 
in the drawing rooms. 

Ocean Park is booming. A street is being 
opened from South Second street to the tract, 
a postoffice has been established with L. B. 
Osborne in charge and Messrs. Kinney & 
Dudley propose planting the sand lots to 

trees. 

CORONADO 

AT NO time during recent years hasCoro- 
nado been so crowded with summer 
residents and visitors. Life in the cottage 
community seems particularly pleasant this 
season and the visitors are a merry throng, 
thoroughly enjoying the various attractions 
of the beach. Fishing is always popular and 
a never failing source of pleasure and full 
strings. 

Guests at Hotel del Coronado are putting 
in the fleeting days withtheskill of old hands 
at enjoyment. Yachting parties have been 
popular during the moonlight evenings of the 
past month. The usual trip is a voyage to 
Point Loma and return with luncheon and 
music to increase the pleasure of the outings. 

While numbers are partial to the plunge 
and swimming pool the waters of the bay at- 
tract others. There are many fine swimmers 
among the young ladies and the bay possesses 
charms for them. 

Wednesday's fish catch broke the record of 
the week, 1090 members of the finny tribe an- 
swering the call of rod and reel. Of this 
number 410 were barracuda, 120albacare, 200 
halibut, 140 sea trout, 40 mackerel and 50 sea 
bass. 

F. W. Hraun of Los Angeles is becoming 
famed among the fishermen guests at Hotel 
del Coronado. During the past week he has 
brought in some of the best catches as regards 
number and size of fish also. 

Mrs. Wm. Bagley accompanied by her 
sons, Wm. Bagley, Jr., also Master Charles 



Bagley and nurse of Los Angeles, are among 
the summer guests at Hotel del Coronado. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Braun and little Miss 
Braun of Los Angeles are spending their 
eighth season at the hotel. 

Clarence L. Cory, professor of engineering 
at the California State University, and H. T. 
Cory of Columbia, Mo., are resting and enjoy- 
ing a stay at the hotel beside the sea. 

Mrs. Dwight Whiting of Los Angeles is 
enjoying a visit from her sister, Mrs. Mary 
Kirby of Coronado. 

Mrs. H. R. Lacy and Miss Lacy of Pasa- 
dena are spending some time at the hotel. 

Mrs. Alfred Abbey, dramatic soprano of 
San Francisco, and Miss Baher have engaged 
apartments at the hotel for a somewhat ex- 
tended stay. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Huntington of San 
Francisco and their charming daughter, Miss 
Edith Huntington, will extend their sojourn 
at Hotel del Coronado through the month of 
August. 

Miss Kirby of Coronado gave a bicycle 
party Tuesday evening. A trip by moonlight 
was made the length of the boulevard and 
along the smooth peninsula road. Following 
the ride a Welsh rarebit party was given at 
Miss Kirby 's home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Laughlin and Miss 
Laughlin of Los Angeles were prominent 
guests at the hotel the past week. 

J. G. Oxnard and Henry T. Oxnard of Ox- 
nard are recent arrivals devoted to golfing and 
swimming and yachting as well as to the 
handling of rod and reel. 

Coronado Comfort and Luxury 

The Society Resort of the Pacific Coast is 
Hotel Del Coronado. The rates are the most 
reasonable known. 

Weekly rates as low as $17.50 for fine out- 
side rooms and best table on the coast 

Baggage taken FREE from San Diego Depot 
to and from Hotel Del Coronado. Passen- 
gers in 'bus charged only 25c each way. 

Temperature at Coronado lower by 10 to 
20 degrees than this city. 

Coronado Climate, as well as Hotel Del 
Coronado, is the finest on Earth. 

A Study in Temperature. — The following 
figures, taken from the United States Weather 
Bureau reports, show the maximum tempera- 
tures of Los Angeles and San Diego for the 
first twenty one days of July, 1899: 

July 1 234567*9 10 11 

Los Angeles 84 82 78 76 84 84 90 88 92 84 78 

San Diego C6 6S 67 67 76 76 74 73 73 68 70 

Julv 12 IS 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

Los Angeles 80 80 78 76 76 76 82 92 90 84 

Shu Diego 68 70 67 66 68 69 71 75 78 74 

Coronado is about 3 degrees cooler than San Diego. 

CATAL1NA ISLAND 

HOW things to "go" in Avalonl One 
can enjoy himself to the limit of his 
endurance, and only this morning a young 
lady came tripping up the Metropole steps, 
flushed and bubbling with the excitement of 
an early morning row, and declared that she 
"had fun twenty-five hours a day," which re- 
mark was enthusiastic but just a bit indiscreet, 
as her chaperone is responsible for her getting 
the regulation eight hours' sleep. 

Of course we "copy-makers" for the Los 
Angeles papers have an awful lot to do besides 
earning our board, and on account of the 
rush to get our letters on the boat cannot be 
blamed for occasional errors in facts or gram- 
mar; but there is too good a joke on one of 
them, whose paper printed that H. G. Sutton 
saved a man from a glass bottom boat. It will 
now be in order for one of them to catch one 
of those ferocious boats for the aquarium. 
By the way, the family in the glass tank has 



been increased by the addition of two big 
eels, two Port Jackson sharks, two dog sharks, 
three devil fish and a million or so baby 
crabs. 



I OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST., Los Angeles, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour lrom 6.30 a.m. to 7.30 
p.m., S.30, 9.30, 10.150, 11.30. 

LEAVE HAND STAND, Santa Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three quarter from 5.4"i a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.45, 9.45, ll'.4. r >. 



SANTA CAT A LIN A ISLAND 



4 



4 * .. 

5 



ftanta Gatalina island 



Three anil one-half hour** from L04 Angeles 
The Greatest Kesort. 
The Loveliest Season ofthe Year 
T t Climate near Perfection 

Phenomenal Pishing and Hunt 



ing 



The great Stage Hide 



Appointments 



Modern HOTEL 

METROPOLE I 
4 



l'nique exel DSlve attractions 
The Famed Marine Gardens ai viewed 
from the glass bottomed boa s 
4 The best and most picturesque Golf Links 
$ Hound trip every day from I.os Angeles 

Sunday excursions, three bonis on the i-land 
Bee 1>'. B. time tallies 

For full information, illustrated pamphle s and 
rates apply to 



Tel. M 3b 



BANNING CO. f 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles ^ 



(«m<em(em<«m -^n. <•» a«^<#a<»a(*^. • 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE. GORDON ARMS I 



Terminal Island, California 



Hotel just Completed ^^^^^^^ 

Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right outon the Ocean 

A Rath house in connec- 
ltates #'! to *4 a day ;<^i* tion with hotel. Finest 
Special rates on beach and surf bathing on 
applies! ion r oast - Golf links, yacht- 

SK '"(?• hshinn. Ten miles of 

S. P. Anderson §§ S > "\5S5SSSI al0Dg 1,each 

Manager SB 



The Attractive Route 



To the Favorite Sea Side 
Kesorts is the 



Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




I Terminal Island, Bythesea 

Catalina Island San Pedro 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and 

most delightful places 
and only n short ride from Los Angeles, where can be 
found the finest Open Sea liathing, Yachting and 
Fishing on the Pacific coast. 

Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket w 
Office, 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. $ 
S. B. Hynes, Gen. Mgr. T. C. PECK.Gen.Agt Pass. Dept. » 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



R E DO N D O 



VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV 



ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 
FROM LOS ANGELES 





* Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



* 
* 

* 
* 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 

Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn 
aments. 

Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 



Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 

Transient Rates S2.r>0 to *4. 



j, Special Weekly Hates 

m 



H. R. WARNER. Prop. 



« 

* 

* 
* 
« 
* 
* 

it 
« 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 



) 
f 
0 

Santa Fe Route ' 




Summer Time Table 

Daily Sekvk k 



Leaves Los Angeles 
ArrUes at Redondo 



9.55 a. m. 1.30 p. m. 
1".35 a. m, .'.10 p. in. 



5.85 p. m. 
8 10 p. in. 



t Sunday Usbtii i 

d Leaves Los Angeles 8.80 a.m. 9.55a.m. 
T 1.30 p.m. 5.35 p.m. 7 00 p.m. 

f Arrives at Refloi <lo 9.10a.m. 1085a.m. 
i 2.10 p.m. fi.10 p. m. 7 40 p.m. 

¥ Last Train Returning Leaves Redondo 8.00 p.m. 

A Sunday Concerts by 

^ Seventh Regiment Band 



Los flntjeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4. 1 899. 9 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Everyday 9.80 am 1.30 pm 5.30 pm 
Sundays 8.10 am 9.30 a in 10.45 am 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 7.00 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for Lot Angeles 

Everyday 8.00 a m ll.OOam 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a in 8.00 a m 9.80 a ni 
1 1 .00 a m 4.15 pm 5 45 p m 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Redondo fi 30 p m 
returning leaves Ix»s Am." • 11.30 p m 

City Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

L.J. PERRY, Superintendent 



BUNOY'S 



c Elsinore 

JV all the 

6 Hot Springs 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottngei Lighted by Acety- 
lene 'ias. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
Year. : : : 



Hotel and Baths 



E. Z UNDY, Prop 

Bates per week-8«. *'J. and S10, inelud 
lng Hot Sulphur Baths. No Con- 
sumptives taken : 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 



One of the most novel and entertaining 
exhibitions, and one which could only be 
be given in Avalon harbor, will be the work- 
ing of a diver in regulation armor securing 
specimens for the aquarium from the bottom 
of the bay. No doubt an interested audience 
will gather about in boats to witness the 
descents. 

A number of new members have registered 
at the Avalon Golf Club house the past week. 

There is someone going around the links 
during most every hour of daylight. A tour- 
nament is to come off beginning August 
when more of the cracks are expected over to 

play- 

REDONDO 

THE tennis tournament ball given last 
Saturday evening was a brilliant func- 
tion and the largest dance at Hotel Redondo 
as yet this season. An elaborate collation 
was served in the small dining room through- 
out the evening and the moonlight and soft 
night breezes enticed many of the dancers into 
the tropical courts and bypaths outside and 
on the sheltered verandas, and still the ball 
room was crowded to its full capacity with 
dancers. Among handsomely gowned Los 
Angeles ladies were noticed Mrs. John F. 
Francis, Mrs. W. H. HallettJ Mrs. \V. A. Hen- 
dryx, Mrs. C. C. Carpenter, Mrs. Wm. Gar- 
land, Miss Bumiller, Miss Stella Bumiller, 
Miss Edna Bumiller, Mrs. Guy Cochran, 
Misses Brotherton, Gwendolin Overton, Car- 
penter, Victoria Carson, Lucy Carson, Florence 
Jones, Irene Stephens, Kidgeway, Mrs. F. W. 
Flint Jr. and others. 

The social event of interest this week will 
be the cotillion which will be given this (Sat- 
urday) evening at Hotel Redondo in which 
twenty-four couples will participate, several of 
the Los Angeles society people being included 
in the number. The favors and figures will 
both be novel and especially suitable for the 
occasion, and it is expected Mr. Wm. Watson 
Lovett of Los Angeles will lead if he returns 
from his camping trip in time, having now 
been absent some ten days. 

R. H. Shoemaker Jr. of Pasadena spent 
Sunday here with his sister, Miss Fannie 
Shoemaker, who took part in the tennis tour- 
nament and put up a remarkably strong 
game. Miss Shoemaker has recently returned 
from an extended visit in the East and took 
part in the tournament where Miss Marion 
Jones won the U.S. ladies' championship. 

Miss Carpenter of Los Angeles gave a sail- 
ing party on the Bonnie Bell Wednesday, and 
R. A. Rowan was among guests from the city 
coming down to participate. 

Col. and Mrs. F. H. Seymour entertained 
with a dinner party at their cottage here Fri- 
day evening, a number of the tennis players 
being their guests. 

Mr. and Mrs. John I. Sabin and the Misses 
Sabin of San Francisco are among distin- 
guished visitors at the hotel. 

John L. Truslow, general agent of the 
Santa Fe lines west of Albuquerque, was a 
guest here during the week. 

Preparations are under way for a golf 
tournament which will be given early in Au- 
gust and for which there will be a large num- 
ber of entries. 

Among the Los Angeles people registered 
at the hotel this week are Miss Bumiller, Eu- 
gene Overton, Harold Braly, A. E. Bell, Paul 
Rowan, Edward L. Mayberry, George I). 
Blake, Miss Carson, Miss Lucy Carson, Harold 
Janss, Henrietta Janss, Mrs. A. M. Stephens, 



Miss Stephens, Adele B. Hambrook, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wellborn, A. Hendryx. Mr. and Mrs. J. 
H. Braly, Dana Burks, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. 
Flint, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Cochran, Mrs. W. 
Stephens, Wm. Young, Miss Brotherton, Miss 
Florence Jones, Fowler Shankland, Guinsey 
E. Newlin, Gregory Perkins Jr., Mr. and Mrs. 
Cosmo Morgan, Eugene Geiniain, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. M. Garland, R. A Rowan, Earl B. 
Rowan, W. R. Wheat, Herbert Peat, E. M. 
Boursland, Mrs. M. M. Haven, Miss Nell 
Deering, A. L. FuMer, Mrs. Goodrich and 
child, Miss Ethel Goodrich. 

G. S. Chambliss and M. A. Guyder, w*ll 
known society men of Pasadena, registered at 
Hotel Redondo Wednesday. 



TERMINAL ISLAND 

ALL those who enjoy seeing a jolly croud 
should have been at the Gordon Arms 
Friday evening when the Sunset Club stormed 
the island, dipped in the Pacific, causing a 
tidal wave, and made thirgs so thoroughly 
jolly that even old Earth himself has been 
shaking with mirth ever since. We poor un- 
fortunates not belonging tr Sol's crowd flat- 
tened our noses against the glass and crouched 
in rheumatic positions around the keyhole in 
our endeavor to hear the speeches, but the 
self-satisfied smile of the speaker was all that 
we could catch. That nothing could exceed 
the eloquence of those speeches we feel assured 
from the wild, enthusiastic applause which 
penetrated even glass and plugged keyholes. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. 1). Willard, Mr. and Mrp. 
Chas. Nordhoff and Mr. and Mrs Sumner P. 
Hunt gave the Sesame Club a dinner Satur- 
day evening at the Gordon Arms, and a most 
delightful excursion on the water was after- 
ward participated in by the entire party, who 
enjoyed to the full the beautiful moonlight 
night. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. C. 
D. Willard, Mrs. Chae. Nordhoff, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sumner P. Hunt, Judge Enoch Knight, 
Dr. and Mrs. Shelley H. Tolhurst, Mr. W. C. 
Patterson, Judge L. A. Groff, Major and Mrs. 
Henry T. Lee, Mr. and Mrs. R. \V. Poindex- 
ter, Miss Caroline Seymore, Mrs. Margaret 
Collier Graham, Miss Fannie Wills, Miss 
Graeme, Miss Mary Belle Elliott, Miss Kate 
O'Donoughue, Miss Jane Collier, Miss Mary 
O'Donoughue, Miss Jennie Winston, Miss 
Brotherton, Mrs. II. B. Wing, Dr. H. M. 
Bishop, Dr. Davidson, C. C. Davis, Homer 
P. Earl, Dr. Samuel Willard, Miss May F. 
Willard. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Gibbon, Mr. H. K. 
Edwards and Miss Hazel Edwards, of Los 
Angeles, and Mr. and Mrs. Brainard of Pasa- 
dena, are among the Gordon Arms guests for 
a season. 

The islanders greatly appreciated the fine 
special Terminal Island edition of W k.-tkkn 
Graphic, and your correspondent knows of 
several cottages which are to contain framed 
copies of the double-page panoramas. 

Judge Enoch Knight was a guest Saturday 
and Sunday of the Gordon Arms. 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Follansbee, M.J)., is 
spending a few days at the (Jordon Arms. 

The usual Saturday Cinderella dance at 
the hotel was a great success, many Angelenos 
taking advantage of the special train put on 
for the occasion, to enjoy the dancing, as well 
as the unusual magnificence of a full moon 
and Hood tide. 

Father— "Who is the beBt writer in your 
class, Bobby?'' Bobby — "Jack Bulger; he 
writes the excuses for every feller in the class." 
— Judge. 



12 



Western Graphic 




Hbovit the Rouse 




UTILIZING paper bags has engrossed the 
attention of some economic writer who 
dilates on the impossibility of keeping one's 
hat clean in a railway carriage and divulges 
his way of overcoming the annoyance of dirty 
headgear. A humble paper bag, obtained 
from the neaiest grocer, is the 
A Plcbian but god of the machine. This is 
Handy Hat Box folded compactly and stowed 
away in the pocket (in the 
hand bag or purse if the traveller is a woman 
and pocketless). Before the cars start the 
bag is opened, the hat placed therein, the bag 
pinned across its mouth and the whole laid in 
the rack. Thereafter, until the destination is 
all but reached, the traveller need have no 
thought of his headgear for no dust or cinders 
can reach it. It will be found in the best of 
condition upon opening. So simple is this 
device that it is a wonder it was never thought 
of before. 

Some remarks that apply as well to old 
and youn<, housewives are directed by Marion 
Harland at the back-number cooks who refuse 
to learn anything new. When 
Leatn to Cook one is too old to learn any- 
Something New thing then his day of life is 
virtually over so far as useful- 
ness to his kind goes. Given a sane mind in 
a sane body and learning should go on in- 
definitely. The man or woman of mature 
years leaves school, because he or she chooses 
to get out of the habit of study. The preju- 
dice against old cook& — said by one authority 
to be either drunk or crazy, as a class — is 
founded upon this disinclination to learn new 
methods.. She who honestly aspires after ex- 
cellence never thinks that she has reached it. 
When in saying, "That is not my way," a 
cook believes that she has put an end, not 
only to all controversy, but to any suspicion 
that the world may have moved an inch or 
two since she learned her trade, she registers 
herself among the incurables. 

The mistress who yields to the earliest 
manifestation to draw the dead line in house- 
wifely progress is weakly indulgent or blindly 
foolish In one wealthy family not a hun- 
dred miles from a great city, "a valued old 
servant" played the tyrant for over a score of 
years. Little by little the employers, mind- 
ful of her long term of faithful service, ad- 
mitted her pleas that this or that new fangled 
way was opposed to her habits and inclina- 
tion, until family bills of fare were monoton- 
ous to boredom, and the style of serving that 
of a preceding generation. At last Eliza died, 
and was buried at the master's expense. 

"It's dreadful, I suppose," piped the young- 
ling of the long suffering band on the way 
home from the funeral, "but it ought to be 
some comfort that we won't be obliged to have 
rice pudding three times a week any more." 

Faithful Eliza had her epitaph. 

Nothing is more solemnly and sadly sure 
in this rushing age than that he who does not 
keep up with it will be thrown down and 
trampled out of sight. It is a trifle appar- 
ently when a woman tabooes oil in salad dress- 
ing because she "has never been used 
to putting it in," when she thinks mint sauce 



a <- trashy" accompaniment to roast lamb, and 
"won't hear of hot sauce with cold pudding," 
or whipped cream as an accompaniment to 
ice cold raw tomatoes; when the vegetable 
dishes must be all set on the table with 
the meat, "as she had always had them," and 
the lettuce cut up and dressed in the kitchen 
at the cook's convenience instead of being 
served crisp and cool from the deft fingers of 
some member of the family who is "up in 
salads.'' 

Each protest is a sympton of decadence 
which is willful, not inevitable. She has 
stopped learning because she has stopped. In 
time mental muscles become stiff, but disuse 
is the cause of the change. 

"I account that day lost in which I have 
learned no new thing," said an aged sage. 

Our housewife may lay the saying to 
heart. If there be a better way than hers of 
doing a thing — from making picklette to giv- 
ing a wedding supper — she should be on the 
alert to possess herself of it. It is not true 

RETAIL MARKETS, SATURDAY, JULY 2!) 

MEATS AND SAUSAGES 

Prime Rib Roast 15c Tenderloin 18@20c 

Leg of Mutton 12Jc Sirloin 18c 

Hind Quarter Lamb. ..$1.25 Round 15 c 

Fore " " ...1.00 Mutton Chops 12Je 

Pork Loir. Roast 15 c Lamb Chops 20c 

Pork Sausage 12jc Pork Chops 12i@15c 

Hamburger " Corned Beef 10c 

Bologna " Salt Pork 15c 

Weinerwurst " Ham, best 2n@25c 

Li Verwurat " Bacon, best 20c 

Porterhouse 22i to36o Lard 12jc 

POULTRY, FISH A ]V D GAME 

Broilers 30(V<l40c Rock Cod, lb 10c 

Fryers 50@65c Cockles, lb 2@3c 

Roasters (iOc Shrimps, lb 15c 

Hens 40@65c Roe, lb 10c 

Ducks 65c Eastern Ojsters.qt 60c 

Turkeys, lb 20c Morgan Oysters, qt 70c 

Geese, lb 20c Halibut, lb 8@10c 

Squab, pair .'{5c Yellowtail.lb 8@10c 

Sea Bass, lb 10c Salmon, lb 15f<i 20c 

Shad, lb 15c Crabs.each 20(w25e 

Baracuda, lb 10c Clams, lb 2(oi3c 

BUTTEK, HOGS AND CHEESE 

Butter, best, roll i>5c Pineapple. 1J lb 85c 

tub, lb 25c " small 45c 

Eggs, doz 20c Soft French Cream 10c. 

Cheese. California 15c Sierra 10c 

Cheese. Martins, N.Y...20c German Breakfast 5c 

Imported Swiss 35c Ohio Swiss 25" 

VEGETABLES 

Potatoes, lb 2c Artichokes, do/. 30c 

Sweet potatoes, lb 10j String beans lb 5c 

Cucumb rs, doz 15c Cabbage, per head 5c 

Egg Plant, lb 10c Onions, lb 2c 

Radishes, bunch 2Jc Turnips, bunch 5c 

Tomatoes, lb 5c Beets, bunch 5c 

Green Peppers lb 10c Asparagus, lb 5c 

Carrots, bunch 5c Watercress, bunch 5c 

Peas, lb 74c Mint, bunch 5c 

Lettuce, bunch 24c Summer squash, lb 2c 

FRUITS AND NUTS 



Apples, fancy, lb 5c 

Apples, cooking, lb 4c 

Oranges, per doz 20@40 

Fancy Valencia,doz.25(g)50 

Limes, doz 10c 

Lemons, doz 10@15c 

Honolulu Bananas, doz 25c 

Rhubarb, lb 3@4c 

<i rape fruit, each 5c 

Eng.Walniits.lb 174o 

Almonds, lbs 15@25 

Pecans, lb 15c 

Mixed nuts, lb 15c 

Peaches, lb 5@"4c 

Pears, lb 10c 



Strawberries, box 5(3il5c 

Blackberries, lb 5(a)74c 

Raspberries, lb ltic 

Loganberries, box 74c 

Cherries, lb 15o 

Loquats, lb 74c 

Figs, lb 74ei 10 

Apricots, lb 4c 

Currants, lb 15c 

Olives, quart 25(i(i40c 

Pineapples, each 25(gi50c 

Cocoanuts, each 10c 

Grapes, lb 10c 

Plums, lb 3(ii)71c 

Canteloupes, lb 10(<ji20c 



that it is easier for young people to keep them- 
selves and their houses abreast of the times 
than it is for their elders. The first step that 
counts in the downward road is the tendency 
not to take any step at all. To stand still is 
to be left. 



The practical joker who said Emperor 
William would be assassinated if he went to 
Egypt has been sentenced to seven years' im- 
prisonment. Germany may be behind the 



times in a great many things, but she can 
give the world several pointers on what to do 
with practical jokers. 

"This is the littlest fifty pounds of ice I 
ever see," said the kitchen lady. "Permit me 
to inform you, madam," said the high-browed 
iceman, "that the apparent 
Jests for smallness is due to the in- 

the Table tense cold to which we sub- 

ject our ice in the process 
of manufacture, thereby producing contrac- 
tion." 

"It ain't any trouble to get along in Eu- 
rope, whether you know the language or not," 
said the man who had been on a "personally 
conducted." "Take Germany, for instance. 
One day I wanted a drink, and I went into 
one of the gardens and said to the waiter: 
"Look here, old man, I'm dry; do you under- 
stand? Dry!" and the next minute he came 
back with three beers." 

**««««««**«*«««**«««*««««*««*«««*« 

* DRINK — ^ * 
% GLEN ROCK 

J A Pure Mountain Spring J 

ft Main Office Newberry's Crystal Water j» 
J 216S. Spring St. * 
«ftftftft«ftftft*ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft«Aftftftft 



VVyVVyVV»VVVV*¥VVVYVV*¥»V«V¥*VVVVV 



ml- 




Pboto= 
graphic 
Supplies! 



tel. m. 1291 



South Main 



£ Los Angeles, 

* "V. ' * 



< Cal - ^£\>W\^%C<y: * 



W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hop- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. ihe only 
manufacturer iu S. Ctlifornin. Rtmember the 
number, 213 W. Fourth St. 



^AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA^ 



HALT! 

T "Military Boardino 
SgHooi 

In Southern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Made 
Military Training Manly 

Parents will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful In deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sous. Mailed free upon application. 

Los Angeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Kmcry, A.M., Principal, 
AValter R. Wheat Ma ager 




Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Che palace 

A Select Family He ort 

Pntrouized by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly fitted, cool in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Kamily Orchestra iu 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Restaurant and Refreshment! 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS / 

55c, 65c to 90c vd, « 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 5, 
■ 5oc. 65c to 75c vd. .C 
LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 

40c to 90c. So to 50c 

REFRIGERATORS *5, $7.50 to 820 

I. T. MARTIN. 531-535 So. Soring SI. 
Wheel Chairs sold or rented. 




Western Graphic 



13 



The New York Times lately had an article 
on what New Yorkers eat, from which we take 
the following: 

"The siege of Paris lasted only four months, 
yet before two of these had passed rich and 
poor knew what hunger was. With the ex- 
ception of milk and a few very perishable 
things it is esiimated that New York City 
could stand at least a four months' siege, the 
supply of meat, poultry, hardy vegetables and 
fruits easily lasting that long if they were 
properly distributed. 

"In the old times surplus supplies of egs.8, 
vegetables and fruits were absolutely wasted, 
but since the cold storage system has come 



1HI2TEL MLTinSIE 

W W Seventh and Olive Sts., Los Angeles 




0 
0 



EUROPEAN PLAN- 60 Rooms 
ELEGANT SUITS Rates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Puss the Doors 



Correspondence 
Prom ptly 
Answered 



into such universal use the over production of 
certain seasons may be saved till times of 
scarcity, thus equalizing the price more nearly 
for the whole year around. More than 
$ 100,000,000 a year on eggs and other perish- 
able food is estimated to be saved by this 
modern process. 

"During the year 1898 90,000,000 dozen 
eggs were consumed in New York, the cus- 
tomers paying $15,400,000 for them. The 
hens of New York state, New Jersey, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri 
and Kansas contributing most of them. 

"New York eats 70,000 bushels of wheat 
Hour a week and the supply averages 975,000 
bushels — leaving a goodly supply in case of 
sudden cutting off from the rest of the world. 
Ten thousand bushels of corn meal are used 
in a week and 05,000 sacks of buckwheat flour 
are gotten rid of in the winter. Six thousand 
bushels of oatmeal a week furnish the break- 
fast tables of Gotham, while the supply on 
hand is enough for six months. 

"At the gathering of the bean crop from 
100.COO to 150,000 bushels are sent to New 
York and its suburbs — four times as much as 
Boston demands. The vast amount of 24,000 
bushels of potatoes are used every day in the 
year, the product of 90,000 acres of land. The 
consumers in New York pay about $13,000,000 
a year for their plebian tubers." 

I kissed her lightly on the cheek, 
Her face blazed up, as I could see; 

I thought in scathing terms she'd speak — 
She turned the other cheek to me! 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



C. H. JlcCONEOAL 

Proprietor 



The entire number of deaths to the Amer- 
ican forces since the opening of the war with 
Spain, both on land and sea, through fighting 
and the result of sickness, amounts to 6,209, 
a little less than half the soldiers killed in 
the three days' fighting around Chattanooga 
thirty-six years ago. 



1MIYSK 1 INS ami 


B0KOKONB 


ELIZABETH A. F0LLANSBEE 


Office hours 8 to 9 a.m 
1 to l p.m 


315 SO. BKOADWAY 




Rooms : 332-331 Laughllu lliillding 


Tel. Main 737 


JOSEPH KURTZ 




Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN, 


Tel. Main 9s. 


Hours: !i a.m. to 12 m., 1 to f, p.m. 




H S. 0RME 


T . lt i Office Main 00 
lels - (Res. Mailt 300 


116-117 DOUQLA9 BLDG 
Third and Spring Streets 


RESIDENCE 
21'. N. BI'NKKR HILL 


TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 


Hours— 10-12 a.m. 


328 NO WILCOX W ILDING 


2 - -1 p.m. 


Tel. Main till 


Residence: THE LOCKE 


DBNTIBT8 


D. CAVE 




I.ANKERSEIM BLOCK 


Tel. Main 1515 


126 West Third Street 





St, Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding; and Day College for 
Young- Men and Boys 

. ."THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
1 merci.il and l'reparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of liachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Che Tall term Begins on monday, September 4th 

For further Information, send for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A UNN, C. M. 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Ev:ry individual or firm here represented is responsible, and WESTERN Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which WESTERN Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa- e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hh ir 
Goods of all kinds. Try Creme i>e Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 

Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
Lager Beers on draught at all prlnciral saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited. Phone M 468 

Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chart n & Fabricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet ami Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re 
gardlessof cost. Now is your chance to get a 

bargain. 
Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

11S>£ N. Main St., Los Ashei.es 

Carriage Works 

A. I. LIKE 

Successor to the Tabor Carriage WorkH. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc.. made to order. 800-802 J . Spring 
and 801-803 S. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 

Carpet Cleaning- 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. G41 South Hroad way. Phone M. 217 
Robt. Jordan 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones, line cuts, embot-smg plates 
newspaper cuts— just any hing you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Ilullding, Los 
Angeles. 

Grillework 

JN0. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 

House Cleaning- 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

I All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, 81.50 day 
25c per hour. 868 S. Broadway. Ceo. Tanabi 

Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

I Are made at Plaza Photo Gallery at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
pcusesand can give you your money's worth. 
Pl.A/.A (iAI.I.KRY, 513 N. Main. 

Real Estate 

" Hsyne llncla the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Baal Batata Agent! 

I 118 West Fourth 8t. - LosAnhei.es 

Printing- 

GEO. RICE & SONS, Inc.) 

The largest and tjest equipped ill Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

111-313 New Hi'. ii St. - Los Anhei.es 



Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repafr Work, Bells, 
Aauunclalors, etc.— 108 W. Thikd St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 



Veterinary Surg-eon 

R. J. WITHERS, M.D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital, 027 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1452. White 2131. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D 

Physician and Surgeon. 
Office hours: 9 to 12 M 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 



Wood-Carpet 

JN0. A. SMITH 

81 26 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 

Wines 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. krkk delivery 
Southern California Wine Co. 220 West 
4th jt., Ix>e Angeles. 



Specialist for women 
2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Keverslonary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms anil 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

P'or terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montg-omery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4/2, 5C a roll 

Gilts 7/ 2 c " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile- 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shados 25c each 

WALTER BROS. 

r>27 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



Oldest himI Largest iisnk in Southern 
California 

'"wieraunsiM 



;rs is Me 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) 1500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HKLLMAN President 

II. W. HEL L.MAN Vice President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashier 

(i. HEIMANN Assistant Oashici 



40% S. SritlNO St. 



Los Anoei.es 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glaasell 

0. W. Chllds L W. Hellmarr, Jr. L N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellrnan I. W. Hellman 

♦ySpeclal Collection Department Our safety 
deposit department otters to the public, safes for 
rent in Its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which Is the strongest, best guarded and beat 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main. Spring and Temple HU. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED 1200,000 

AP1TAL STOCK PAID CP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUOOK Prealdent 

1. N. VAN NUYS Vioe-Prculderit 

B. V. DUQUB Cashier 

Direc'Torh H. W. Ilcllnian, Kasner Cohir, H. 
W. O'Melveny, L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, 
T L. Drxiue, I. N. Van Nuys, W.O. Kerckhoff, A. 

Haaa. 

Park Market 

CHAM. KKHTNKK, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone Bad t>2f> 



1 ) 



Western Graphic 




THE return of Blanch Bates to San Fran- 
cisco has served to stir up some inter- 
esting reminiscences among the old timers, 
and Town Talk relates some of the yarns of 
the gossips. They were veteran theater-goers 
who could tell you all ahout the plays that 
were produced at the old American theater in 
Sansome street and of the mummers that ap- 
peared at the Metropolitan opera house in the 
days when dramatic companies came from 
New York to San Francisco by water. And 
it came about that the name of Sallie Hinck- 
ley came into theconversation because Blanche 
Bates called Sallie "Auntie" and it was large- 
ly to the generosity of the ex actress that the 
present Frawley star owes the thoroughness 
of her education, which included not only 
ordinary branches of learning but extended 
into drama and music. I am told that Signor 
Lucchesi says of his former pupil that she 
would have made name and fame on the con- 
cert stage had she not chosen to adopt a dra- 
matic career instead. Sallie Hinckley and 
Blanche's mother have been friends from girl- 
hood's days and the former was as solicitous 
for the wellfare of Mrs. Bates' daughter as if 



while, but she could not retain that divine 
figure forever. Adipose tissue came with years 
and when embonpoint asserted itself Sallie 
Hinckley left the stage and opened a lodging 
house in Montgomery street. 

THE Orpheum management have consid- 
erately put the Gardner brothers the first 
on their programe this week, so the chronic 
late-comers at least do] not have to endure the 
sight of one small boy making a living for his 
elder brothers. 

Milian and Shields do some rip-snorting 
corned}', but the best of the bill is the Hayes 
and Lytton company in ''A Wise Guy." Such 
a lot of nonsensical nonsense and continual 
fun has not been seen in Los Angles in many 
a moon and the reception of the farce 
amounted to a tribute to George M. Cohan, 
the author. By the way, I would buy two 
seats to see Cohan do his eccentric dance again. 

Manager Myers has been making his adieus 
this week and leaves Sunday for his new post 
at Omaha. As each succeeding head of the 
Orpheum has been a bit jollier and agreeable 
fellow than his predecessor, Mr. Myers will 
not take it amiss if I anticipate the advent of 
his successor, the while wishing him the best 
in the box at the city by the Missouri river. 

THERE are a number of faithfuls who 
never miss a night of the Italian opera, 
and they are but to be envied, for the grand 



ing there is no praise unsaid for the members, 
individually and collectively. To many 
people it has been the opportunity of a life- 
time. It is true there have been some incon- 
gruities in costuming and other minor points 
that might be criticised in any other company, 
but these have been counterbalanced, even 
lost to the critics, in the overwhelming flow of 
melody, the grandeur of the human voice in 
its highest perfection, the incomparable beauty 
and richness of the art of these men and 
women from sunny Italy. 



Orpheum Minnie Palmer, one of the most fa- 
mous actresses in the country, and a recent acquisi- 
tion to vaudeville, heads the new bill at the Orpheum 
next week. She will present a new comedy, from the 
French, in which she assumes two roles, that of a sis- 
ter of mercy and a music hall artist. She pleads for 
her lover's pardon, as a sister of mercy, before one of 
Napoleon's marshals, and, entreaties failing, resorts 
to the blandishments of a stage coquette. In the 
latter role. Miss Palmer is to introduce the dancing 
specialties that were famous in "My Sweetheart" 
years ago. 

Geo. Wilson, the ex-minstrel king, of "Waltz Me 
Again" fame, is booked for an important engagement, 
beginning next week. Kilpatrick and Barber, trick 
cyclists; Les Brownes, one legged performers, male 
and female, with a sensational act; Hayes and Lytton, 
in "A Wise Guy;" the Rixfords, head and hand bal- 
ancers; and Millian and Shields, knock-about come- 
dians, will all be on the bill. 

"I thought," said the disappointed friend, 
"you told me this election was going to be a 





American Eng. Co. 

she had been in reality the child's aunt. She 
was herself a mother, having a son by the 
husband with whom she had eloped at the age 
of sixteen, Roundey by name, but in Blanche 
Bates she took an almost deeper interest thin 
in her own child. Possibly she saw in Blanche 
the makings of the fine actress that the girl 
has since become. 

Now there are not many people who re- 
member Sallie Hinckley or any of the inci- 
dents in her romantic career. Sallie was one 
of the most popular of early Californian ac- 
tresses and she was a woman of many per- 
sonal charms combined with all the dash and 
coquetry of a Parisienne. When she exhib- 
ited her ravishing curves in the role of Maz- 
eppa, the men-about town of the period were 
plunged into rapturous admiration. And 
when Sallie Hinckley got through entertain- 
ing the public there was no entertainment too 
expensive for her and there were men by the 
score willing to provide it. The swath that 
she cut was a wide one indeed. She could 
have had half the town if she wanted it. A 
banker chaperoned her to New York and 
spent a fortune to exploit her in "The Black 
Crook" and he lost his money but not his 
ardor. And there were others as gallant and 
generous as the banker. A pretty woman 
was a rara avis in San Francisco in those 
days and Sallie Hinckley queened it for a 



A LOS ANGELES BABY 

aggregation of superb voices in the Lambardi 
company is a never ending source of comment 
among music lovers. "The Barbarof Seville" 
is a new opera in their repeitorie, first sung 
in Los Angeles last Saturday evening. A 
noteworthy point in that melodious score of 
Rossini's is the absence of chorus, an opening 
male chorus being the only one in the opera. 
But it is full of pretty airs that one can 
hum without full orchestra accompaniment 
and the wonder is that it is not oftener sung 
on the American stage. "Mignon," another 
opera presented for the first time during this 
engagement, is as a lace dress. It would seem 
the dainty music would break as it falls from 
the lips of the artists, while the bars of dra- 
matic color are of a brilliant character, a 
pride to Americans in the American composer. 
Another opera new to Angelenos was "Un 
Hallo in Maschera," the last of Verdi's Italian 
operas, presented Thursday evening. It plainly 
shows the influence of modern composition, is 
highly dramatic and has a tragic climax in 
the assassination of the colonial governor at a 
masked ball. A pretty incident of the even- 
ing was the presentation of a handsome bou- 
quet to Madame Modjeska, who occupied a 
box. The tribute to the great actress was 
from the hand of Manager Wyatt, who thus 
expressed his admiration with courtly grace. 
Now that the Lambardi Company are go- 



rhoto by Steckle 

walk-over." "Well," answered the former 
candidate, "it was I was the doorstep." — 
Washington Star. 

Work on the pier extension at Coronado 
is full under way and progressing rapidly. 
The great pile driver is attracting much at- 
tention as the days goby. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIX8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July 31. 

Minnie Palmer, assisted by 

FraiK-U Je< rard, in tbc One-Act Play, "Rose Pompon." 
George Wilson, Premier of all Monologue Artists, 

Kilpatrick anil Barber, Scientific Trick Bicyclists. 

I. «■* Browne. Acrobats, Jumpers, Dancers, Instrumentalists 

Hayes end i.yt on, In the Faroe Comedy "A Wise Guy." 

The Kixfordx, Musical and Athletic: a positive novelty. 
Million and Shields, the Tragic Comedians. 




PRICKS never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 26a to anv part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



«? 1 - 



ERE IS JUST ONE 



Fi rat-Class 



LOS ANGELES CLOTHING STOGE 

WE «« IT 



SUITS, $20 oo down 



Your Money Back 

if you want it 



LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY 

I 17 to 125 North Spring St. 



Western Graphic 



15 



mmmwmm 

Rational 6uardsmen 

CONDUCTED BY SHIRLKY L. HOLT 

C A REAT interest is being taken in the for- 
f mation of the new volunteer regiments 
by members of the National Guard. The 
Thirty-fifth U. S. Volunteer Regiment, which 
is being formed on this coast, is taking a large 
number of its officers from Southern Califor- 
nia. There have been appointed three cap- 
tains and one lieutenant who served with the 
Seventh California Volunteers. Among these 
are some of the best officers in the state, Capt. 
Schrieber being without doubt one of the best 
tacticians in the country in National Guard 
circles. His long service in the Seventh Regi- 
ment, N.G.C., has made him a most popular 
officer with both officers and enlisted men and 
he will be heard from in a manner that will re- 
flect great credit upon himself and the regi- 
ment he came from. 



Captain Lawrence of the Signal Corps, 
who has been in the Philippines in the volun- 
teer service for the past year, returned home 
last Tuesday morning. He was met at the 
depot by a large number of relatives and 
friends. Thursday evening the Signal Corps 
gave him a reception at the armory and on 
Friday evening they banquetted him at Jerry 
Illich'8. Some day next week the officers of 
Brigade propose to banquet the captain in 
royal style. Captain Lawrence is one of the 
most popular officers in the First Brigade, 
and during his campaign in Luzon showed 
himself to be made of the right metal. He 
will probably be mustered out of the volunteer 
service in a couple of months, when he will 
again take command of the Signal Corps. 

Regimental Orders, No. 1, have ju-t been 
issued. It is a voluminous document con- 
taining all of the discharges for the past 
year and thd appointment of non-coms in the 
various companies. The order is a very in- 
teresting one and we notice a number of 
changes amongst the old-timers. J. H. Keller, 
sergeant major of the Second Battalion, was 
discharged on account of removal. Sergeant 
Keller was one of the oldest members of the 
Seventh Regiment. 

Louis S. Chappelear received notice of his 
appointment, to a second lieutenancy in the 
volunteer service last week. The appointee is 
first lieutenant in Compamy F, Seventh Regi- 
ment, N.G.C., and served with the Seventh 
Volunteers during the late war with Spain, 
being detailed as regimental commissary. He 
was formerly a military instructor at the 
Whittier Reform School. 

Companies E and H, of Santa Paula and 
Ventura respectively, failed to report for duty 
and have been mustered out of the service 
and all members, with the exception of Cap- 
tain A. W. Browne of Company H who has 
been retired, have been honorably discharged. 
This leaves a ten-company regiment which 
was accepted as a regiment in General Orders 
of June 30lh. 

The Orpheum management donated fifty 
per cent of the net proceeds of last night's 
performance to the Medal Fund This fund 
is being raised by the Native Sons for the pur- 
pose of presenting each volunteer from this 
state with a medal. The house was well filled. 
Company A attended in a body as the guest 
of their commanding officer, Captain "Bob" 
Wankowski. 



Captain Samuel R. Langworthy, who re- 
ceived a captain's commission in the Thirty- 
fifth Volunteer Infantry last week, began his 
military career at Riverside in Company M 
in 1890. 

Major Prescott of Redlands made a Hying 
trip to the city last week. Colonel Berry anil 
the Major had their heads close together for 
a long time and it is expected that much good 
will result to the regiment from the consul- 
tation. 

A recent order of the war department per- 
mits the immediate family of a volunteer 
soldier on foreign duty to purchase fud and 
subsistance stores at cost prices for family 
use. _ 

Commissary Sergeant Raj* Follmer, the 
popular sergeant major of the Seventh Volun- 
teers, is doing some lively hustling for a vol- 
unteer commission. 



Lieut. Bradbury of Company A has been 
tendered a major's commission in the volun- 
teer service, but declined it on account of his 
personal business needing his attention at 
home. 

Chaplain A. S. Clark and Lieutenant Joy 
Winans of Company F, failed to report for 
duty within the prescribed time and have been 
discharged. 

The newly elected officers of Company C 
failed to qualify on their first examination. 
They will be given a second examination 
next week. 

"The Free Harbor Contest" is the title of 
a 200-page volume from the pen of C. D. Wil- 
lard, recently editor of the Express. Mr. 

Willard was an earnest and 
History of the tireless supporter of the 
Harbor Contest people's side in the long 

struggle for a deep water har- 
bor at San Pedro, and was in constant touch 
with every move in the battle. This coupled 
with his talent as a graphic and felicitous 
writer are the qualities that have enabled 
him to make not only an accurate history but 
an interesting story from the records of the 
fight. The volume is prettily bound and por- 
traits of the principal characters concerned 
are interspersed. 

The paragraphers and funny men have all 
had their innings on the kissmg bug, but it 
has remained for Prof. W. H. Ashmead, en- 
tomologist of the Smithsonian 
The Truth Institute to enlighten us sci- 

About the entifically on the melanoles- 

Kissing Bug tes picipes, which is (he com- 
pany name of the nocturnal 
Hobsonia. Mr. Ashmead says that in the 
larva' state these creatures resemble somewhat 
the common bedbug. In fact, in the States of 
California and Texas and in all the south- 
western country where considerable annoy- 
ance and suffering are caused by its depreda- 
tions, it is commonly known as the "Great 
Big Bedbug." Moreover, it is a ferocious in- 
sect, though it only preys upon warm-blooded 
animals during seasons of unusual abundance 
of insect life, when its attacks upon slumber- 
ing maidens are more of the nature of an 
accident. 



The Mocking Bird 

ill-: is THE most FINISHED ARTIST ok his kind 
But no such saving clause is demanded in 
commending the skill of the cat bird's cousin, 
the mocking bird, says Lippincolt's. In him 
we recognize the finished artist. His imita- 
tions are almost exact reproductions in every 
particular and cause the cat bird's efforts to 



appear by contrast broad caricatures. And 
they are delivered with all the confidence and 
self reliance of a master. Mounting to the 
top of a tall tree, he will amuse himself by 
the hour, pouring forth the note i of one bird 
after another with evident enjoyment of his 
own talent. 

I quote from my notebook a description of 
one of his matinee performances before break- 
fast (the proper time for a matinee), which I 
attended by creeping under the tent curtain. 
I was sitting at the foot of a tree on the top of 
which he was perched, unconscious of my 
presence. "He gives an imitation of one of 
the notes of the guinea hen, a fine imitation 
of the cardinal, an exact reproduction of the 
note of the phoebe and some of the difficult 
notes of the yellow-breasted chat. Now I 
hear a young chicken peeping. Now the 
Carolina wren sings 'cheerily, cheerily, 
cheerily.' Now a small bird is shrilling with 
a fine insect tone. A flicker, wood-p^ewee and 
phoebe follow in quick succession. Then a 
tufted titmouse squeals. To display his versa- 
tility, he gives a dull performance which 
couples the 'Go back!' of the guinea fowl with 
the plaint of the wood peewee. [Two more 
widely diverse vocal sounds it would be hard 
to select.] With all the performance there is 
such perfect pelf reliance and consciousness 
of superior ability that one feels that the 
singer has but to choose what bird he will 
imitate next." 

r SGHRflMSBERGl 

...WINES... 

The Host Famous of California j 



Light, Delicate Wines, |||| 




ft'fi?^ great care at the \ ineyard gregi 



PACiriC COAST AGENTS 



; Sherwood & Sherwood 

^ ^ Lo g Angeles San Francisco Portla nd ^ J 



mount Eowe Railway 

Magnificent Panorama of Kartli and Ocean 
(irandest Trip on Earth 



ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITl'ATEI) on the summit ol Echo Mountain, § 
3f>00 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 



panoramic view of Southern California ■ high § 

class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartmciits . 

wiih or without hatha < uislne unexcelled f 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week . 

SPECIAL f 

(iucsts remaining one week or longer will he al- A 

lowed a rebate of their Mount Ijowc Hallway fare t 

tO BOhO Mountain and return ami I r,Ue round trip A 

rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if \ 

desired. A 
Tlekets and lull information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER \ 

Xrafllc imi Kxourelon Agent ^ 

214 South Spring; St. - Los Angeles Cal. A 



Tel. Main 960 




LADIES * 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Client 1st 



Nort h Matin st i «■«•! 



.it^Price 50cts 



Tailoring and Repairing 

Suits made to order, goods the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

II. L«. Ybkoku, 11H West Second Street. 



■ 




JOQKEY REIFF, TOD SLOAN'S NEW RIVAL. 

Sluan's American rival, .Joliiniy KcilT. known as "Midfeet" Ileilf, who is lioiij 
disputing (lie first place on the Knylish rare Hacks, comes from Kansas. Johnny rid«l 
at 82 pounds and is considered a wonder, lie has heen riding only a year, hut liai 
?cored uif»nv successes. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 



i 

: 




It looks iusl like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 



3pend the Summer 



AT 



San Diego and 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



June 16 and 17 
July I and 2 



August 4 and 5 
September I and 2 



Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

Inquire of Santa Fo Route Agent 200 South Spring Street (cor. '2nd) Los Angeles 



Gardening »n 
California * * 

W. S. LYON 

FREE 




For a limited time we will give 
one of these books with each 
new or renewed annual sub- 
scription to Western 
Graphic 
$2.00 a year 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
2 lowers in Southern 
California 

^Written for tliis Soif and Climate 
J2icehj frustrated 
Siurn lover of fflo&ers sfioutd Have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) ""^af 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 




F)MNTERS »» 
UBLISHERS 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for us to 
handle to your entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 

Tel. M. 1053 LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



0<j SUCCKSSOK TO p>0 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 

701 South Main Street 

Electrical Repairing 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

nn^i Switchboard 

J\.pp ara tus 

First=Class Machine Work 

JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) 311 313 N'w Hieh Street 



Western Graphic 





COPYRIGHTED 1S3S 



ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 
FOR SWTHCRrS -CALIFORNIA. 



Volume VII. 
Number 6 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 5, 1899. 



Kdltion de Lui 
■ o Cents a Cop> 




A MODEL CALIFORNIA ROAD SEE PAGE 8 



Western Grapliic 



McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 




The Best Collar 
ever sold for . . 



12k 



We have just closed a purchase with one of the 
largest and finest collar makers in America for five 
hundred dozen of the very best collars their factory is 
capable of turning out. This collar is precisely the 
same in shape, style, fit and finish as the 25c collars. 
They are made from eighteen hundred linen. In 
material and workmanship they are far and away ahead 
of anj' collar heretofore retailed in Los Angeles at this 
figure. 

This is made possible by the economy in manufact- 
uring so large a lot as five hundred dozen for one house. 
Remember, all the latest and most desirable shapes and 
only i2 l / 2 c each. Gentlemen, you should supply your- 
self with collars for two years to come. 

California Blankets— just the thing for campers and seaside cottagers, 
J2.95 a pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 



317=325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Entered at the postoffice iu Los Angeles as second-class mail matter 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 

Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 



Single 



*X- *sL« » X» * 1^ •st* ^X- *sl^» *\L» 




JOSKI'II MA1KR, (iEOKliK ZOBEI.EIN g\ 

Pres and Trcas. Vice-Pres. and Sec'y fj 

HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier & Zobelein 

Rrewery 



INOOXFOBATCD 



444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91. 



r\ Los /fqge/es 




212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses iu Hook-keeping, Shorthand. Typewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

LA Off C * ^^^^^^vw^-w^x 

♦ A* iulphUr bpringS and Baths 

jp • »» Cor. Mac; and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 

£ These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of 
Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. 

A. PUISSEGUE, Proprietor MES, L. LARIEUX, Manageress 



i ROM NEW YORK TO FRISCO BY AUTOMOBILE. 

Frenchmen think they are antomobilists because they have traveled l!'.!l miles in j. 
horseless carriage. American pluck and enterprise is to show them their mistake. 
Mr. and Mrs. John^D. Davis are on their way across the continent from New Yol k to 
.San francisco in an automobile. They will travel 3,700 miles before reaching the end 
of their journey, and some of the roads they will encounter are far from good, while iu 




. rnnee all of the highways are excellent. The automobile used by Mr. Davis wm 
especially constructed for the trip. It derives its motive power from gasoline. The 
progress of this first attempt at a long journey by automobile in this country will be 
watched with great interest. That the horseless carriage lias come to stay no one 
doubts, but before it comes into general use proof must be furnished that it will be 
available for more than short pleasure outings on highly improved roads. The Dav^s 
aunt may furnish the desired proof. 



A 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 



ROUND TRIP 



50c 



Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



J> ^ Good Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



jft J- Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9.35 p.m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



Announcement 

High-class Ladies' Tailor 

We have opened a well-appointed De 
parlment of Ladies' Tailoring. We are 
turning out work in this department up 
to our high standard. Material and work 
equal to best New York tailors. 



Tel. 'Red 37 1 J 



J. KORN 

348 South 'Broadway 



NOTICE 

The Los Angeles City W.ter Company will 
strictly enforce the following rule: The hours 
for sprinkling are between (i and 8 o'clock a. m. 
and t', and g o'clock p m. For h violatiou of the 
ab >ve regulation the water will be shut on", and 
u line of *2.0U will be charged before the water 
will be turned on again. 



NOTICK OF FORECLOSURE SA I. K 

Sheri It's Sale, No. 3>W>. 

J. M. Ell iott and H. T. Ice, as Trustees for 
Jessie I'. Church, plaintiffs, vs. Minnie s. Serrot. 
the Said Minnie Serrot and J. W. Gillette and W. 
W. Widney as Kx cutors of the Will of Charles 
K. Serrot, deceased. Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 13th day of .luly, 
A.D., 1899, iu the above entitled a'-tion, where- 
in J. M. Elliott, et al., the above named 
plaiutlfls, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie S. Serrot, 
et al., defendants, on the 27th day of June, 
A. D. 1899, for the sum of Seventeen Hundred 
and Fourteen and JO-lOU Dollars, gold coin of the 
United states, which said decree was, on the 
:Ulth day of June, A. D 1899, recorded 
In Judgment Hook 85 of said Court, 
at page I. I am commanded to sell all that 
certain lot, piece, or parcel of land situate, 
lying and being In the county of Los Angeles, 
state of California, and bounded and described 



as follows: Lot Thirteen (18) of Hodgkin's Sub- 
division of Lot Kighty-s ven (N7) and Elghtv- 
eight i*8) of Watt's Subdivision of part of the 
Hancho San Rafael, according to the map of 
said Hodgkin's Subdivision, recorded in Book 
5, page 576 of the Miscellaneous Records of Los 
Angeles County, California. Together with Teu 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamore 
Canyon Water Company of San Rafael, Los 
Angeles County, California. 

Together with all and singular the tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, or in anywise appertaining. 

Public notice is herebv given that on Tuesday, 
the 8th day of August, A. I). 1899, at 12 o'clock 
M. of that day, in front of the Court House door 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost*, etc., to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash, gold coin of the U. 8. 

Dated this 18th day of July, 1899. 

W. A. HAM MEL, 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

BySTEPH N A LD EN. Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Scott, Plaintiff 's Attorneys. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 6 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 5, 1899, 



lidition dc l uxe 
in Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

bkn. c. truman :-: :-: :-: kditor 



IT has been a prolonged business this war 
with the insurgents in the Phillipines. 
The results of the campaign, practically 
closed for the present, by 
The Phillipijic reason of the rainy season, 
Situation. do not come up apparently 

to the expectations of the 
people of this country, who seem to be im- 
patient, that Aguinaldo and his followers 
have not been summarily squelched before 
that. 

Now having at last succeeded in their 
laudable efforts in disposing of the Secretary 
of War Alger, let us hope that the other indi- 
vidual across the water, will also see the 
necessity of ceasing his persistent efforts to 
wear out the patience of the American people 
and like the late secretary himself, even that 
of his own party. 

That there is somewhat of unreason in the 
conclusions of the public at this time, goes 
without saying, considering the obstacles the 
forces have had to encounter in operating in 
an unknown country, unprepared by expe- 
rience, and against unfavorable climatic con- 
ditions. Chasing the insurgents would seem 
pretty much like trying to corral a lot of 
monkeys in a forest, that scatter and disap- 
pear as soon as you get near them only to bob 
up serenely and grin at you elsewhere. 

As the Presidential campaign is appa- 
rently one of more absorbing interest to the 
public, everything unfortunately at this time 
has the tendency to run into politics. 

To try and rush matters in the Philli- 
pines merely for political effect would be 
neither a proper nor a prudent course in 
those who have the conduct of affairs. 

The prosecution of the war in those islands 
in which the honor of the country is involved, 
is not a question of party, and must have the 
support of every loyal citizen of the United 
States, irrespective of politics, until brought 
to a satisfactory conclusion. The disposition 
of those islands is another matter, susceptible 
of discussion in time. But every true Amer- 
ican must stand on guard to protect his coun- 
try's honor, until that end is achieved. 

There can be no doubt that reinforcements 
are imperatively necessary by reason of the 
withdrawal of the volunteer forces and to 
ease the strain upon the troops remaining 
there, who, already debilitated, more or less, 
by fatigue and exposure to the elements, have 
yet to face the wet and unhealthy season and 
the hospital, throwing still harder work upon 
the balance who are fit to do what fighting 
there may be before the arrival of the rein- 
forcements, now called for, and the dry season 
to wind up the business. 



But to carry out the policy of complete 
subjection of the insurgents in the island of 
Luzon, is a matter of time. Time is the es- 
sence of the undertaking. 

It has to be done carefully and system- 
atically, and with as little sacrifice as possible 
of the forces by unnecessary exposure. As 
you destroy the power of the insurgents and 
the Aguinaldos for future mischief you have 
also to build up something more solid in its 
place. The work of law and order has to go 
hand in hand with the suppression of law- 
lessness and rebellion. 

All that is necessary to be achieved can be 
achieved more effectually and satisfactorily 
without undue haste. I'ncle Sam is there to 
remain until order is established, in spite of 
the rabid ravings and disloyal utterances of 
anti-expansionists for party purposes. 

There is one thing they cannot find fault 
with, and that is, the bravery, dash, and de- 
votion of the American soldier and the volun- 
teer forces more particularly, which cannot 
but have forcibly impressed itself upon the 
the Filipinos themselves whether in favor of, 
or opposed, to the rule of the United States 
over those islands. 

By this time they have learned to honor 
the stuff Uncle Sam's people are made of, and 
that will have its effect in due time, as law 
and order is gradually restored throughout 
the country. 

The bulk of the population outside of 
Manila have not comprehended the situation 
to its fullest extent. But they are past doing 
so. Once that important fact is projected 
into their understanding, that they are not 
dealing with Spaniards by whom they have 
been so often deceived, and can put faith in 
the expressed intentions of this country, all 
will be well. But that requires time. 

It is a hard thing to impress any heathen 
or christian, savage or civilized, with the laud- 
able nature of your intentions and benevo- 
lence, when he is being chased from pillar to 
post all over the country with a sharp stick, 
without giving him at least time to assume a 
proper posture of mind, as well as body, to 
absorb the situation. 

The let up of the campaign during the 
rainy season may now possibly furnish the 
Filipinos with the desired opportunity and 
perhaps enable the Aguinaldos to understand 
the impossibilities of their position in endeav- 
oring to wage war with the United States. 

There is a field for profound study in the 
unknown suicide this week and the opportun- 
ity for philosophical deductions is as large as 

the phases of the subject. A 
// is few years ago self destruction 

Heller So was universally considered a 

moral crime, and in many 
States a crime under the law, an unsuccessful 
attempt at suicide being a felony. Today 
only two States have such statutes in force, 
and the term " self murder " is rarely applied 
in the prints. Are we gradually accepting 
voluntary death as a modern expedient? 
Even the element of disgrace attaching to a 
suicide's family is being eliminated, and many 
of these sensations of the hour are dismissed 



with, "It is better so." Then the nonchalance 
with which some suicides seek death would 
read as fiction a decade since. It is a remark- 
able state of mind when a man devotes the 
week preceding the date he has set for his 
demise to sightseeing, writing poetry and even 
penning a brief criticism of a book he has 
read. We cannot call such a man a coward. 
He completely hides his identity, presumably 
to save his friends and relations the slight 
disgrace still clinging to a suicidal act. He 
leaves a cheerful message to the public which 
to an extent militates against the horror of 
hia taking off. He evidences his uselessness 
on earth, and tells of his physical misery, 
Surely, such a case brings to us the right to 
say — it is better so. 

Judge York of the Superior court of this 
county, recognized as one of the ablest jur- 
ists and lawyers of the State, has been often 

mentioned as a suitable man 
Available to fill the vacant senatorship 

for Senator in this State. The judge has 

been urged by his friends to 
become a candidate for the position, but in 
his dignified way has declined to enter into 
any unseemly scramble for this or any other 
office. Judge York would be a strong man 
and would make an ideal representative for 
California in the upper house of Congress. 
His splendid bearing would command atten- 
tion, his earnestness would insure consid- 
eration, and his indomitable industry in 
committees and high councils would secure 
for California proper recognition. 

City Auditor Carson provides an interest- 
ing document in his elaborately detailed esti- 
mate of the expenses of running Greater Los 

Angeles for the current fiscal 
A Year's year. The grand total exceeds 

Expenses the amount allowed last year 

by about $12,000, some items 
being increased slightly, others decreased. 
That an "off" political year is a decided sav- 
ing is shown in the estimate of $2,500 for 
election expenses, against $10,000 last year. 
Verily, politics come high, but we must have 
them. Another revelation in the document is 
the astonishing one that there is newspaper 
competition in this city of Angels — why else 
should the item of adveriising melt from 
$7,575 to an even $-1,000 in one year. One 
of the largest cuts from the department esti- 
mates was in the health department budget, 
$24,590 being lopped off, leaving $10,8:10, with 
a twenty-two thousand dollar deficit. The 
fire department will have nearly twenty six 
thousand more to spend than last year, while 
the police department only gets a raise of two 
thousand dollars. This latter item will prob- 
ably be a source of considerable discontent, as 
the department estimate had provided for 
twenty-five extra men to cover some of our 
annexed territory, which increase was neatly 
amputated by Auditor Carson. Altogether 
the cut from the suggestions of department 
heads amounts to $1(15, 1 18.98. 

The rumors that Kagan will be re-instated 
and that Alger will be given a foreign mission 
are simply rot. Mc Kin ley is 
McKinUy is the logical candidate before 
Still Sane the coining National Republi- 

can Convention, and he is 
not going to commit any downright foolish- 
ness meanwhile. 



4 



Western Graphic 




Observations of the Owl 



THAT an epidemic of suicide is prevalent 
hereabouts is a fact much less deplor- 
able than it might be. But for the quotidian 
self-murder the daily newspapers at this sea- 
son would be soporific with 
The Suicide their plethora of church news, 
As a Coward seaside personals and roasts 
of Alger. That no felo de so 
hasyet left a written record of his desire 
to help out the newspapers on a dull 
day is not prima facia evidence that 
some such unselfish motive may not 
have had something to do with prompting 
him to pull the trigger, mix the potion or 
turn on the gas, the discovered result of 
which would in due time give occasion for 
black scare heads and the now familiar out- 
cry of the newsboy. Whatever profits the 
newspapers may derive from sending broad- 
cast the details of some wretched creature's self- 
undoing, it is certain that society loses little 
by the pruning process. Is a moping misan- 
thrope worth the space he occupies on this 
earth, which is already becoming overcrowded? 
Is a hopelessly incurable, pain-wracked in- 
valid merciful to himself and to his associates 
by clinging to a life that can be no better? 
Can a murderer better escape the hangman 
than by hanging himself ? Of such are most 
suicides. Few of those that have of late vol- 
untarily made of their bodies causes of discor- 
dant strife among local undertakers could, 
had they previously been asked, have shown 
any good excuse for living at all. Wherefore 
should they be deterred from laying violent 
hands upon a God-given but mis spent life? 
It is the man who for less excuse seeks 
through the gates of death a refuge from cares 
that fall with doubled and trebled force upon 
those that stay upon this side of the dark 
river, that deserves upon his grave stone the 
epitaph: "This was a coward." 

The city board of education made up its 
collective mind to economize and then did it. 
Retrenchment in public expenditure is, as a 
general thing.most commend- 
Principals Pay able, but for some reason the 
the Freight people do not seem to be ap- 
plauding the result of the 
school board's efforts to protect the interest of 
taxpayers. The board found by a process of 
reasoning with some figuring that the condi- 
tion of the available funds was such that the 
school year must necessarily be shortened or 
the salaries would have to be cut, especially 
as cooking and sewing are to be added to the 
curriculum. To tide over the difficulty the 
board reduced the salaries of the principals. 
The principals of ten-room schools suffer a 
loss of $12.50 a month and those of other 
buildings are affected in proportion. And all 
feel it. The total saved by the cutting of the 
principals' salaries is $6000 which is enough 
to pay the expenses of the Los Angeles school 
department about three days The principals 
that feel "out and injured" find little solace in 
the assurance that the board, realizing its mis- 
take, gladly would restore the old schedule if 



such restoration could legally be done; but 
salaries for the year must be fixed before June 
30th. The principals find equally cold corn- 
fort in the declaration of some members of the 
board that a tacit agreement had been made 
in caucus to order a horizontal cut all along 
the line, but when the subject came up in open 
board meeting all the members weakened on 
the proposition to reduce salaries of teachers 
and officers, and rallied only on the proposi- 
tion to take from the principals the amount 
considered necessary to help out the deficit 
and to pay for the cooking school. Therefore 
the principals for the coming year will be 
compelled to pay the salary of the new cook- 
ing teacher from Boston or Minneapolis and 
to pay for the groceries that will be spoiled in 
guiding the infant hands to mould the tooth- 
some doughnut and to mix the "bla monge." 

The spectacle of a public officer confessing 
that he had erred in judgment and providing 
a proper remedy for the consequences of the 

acknowledged error, is seldom 
He Did the witnessed in these days, when 
Squealing mistakes of officers, like those 

of doctors, are too often buried. 
Councilman Toll of the Fifth ward learned 
what many people learned before, that the 
purchase of an inaccessible lot at an exor- 
bitant price, for an engine house site, was a 
mistake of the guardians of the city. As he 
was blamed for the selection of the lot with 
the fancy price, Councilman Toll has caused 
the piece of property to be advertised for sale 
at the price the city paid, and he binds him- 
self to find a purchaser. If in securing a 
buyer for the overvalued triangle Councilman 
Toll shall suffer pecuniary personal loss it 
will be much regretted by his friends who, 
even in the face of hi3 mistaken judgment, 
have no less an opinion of his integrity. 

An unwritten law accords to all the muni- 
cipal officers who have their habitat in the 
city hall the right to obtain tlowers from the 
public park gardens and greenhouses. That 

councilmen and attaches of 
Nice Flowers the street superintendent's 
So Cheap department and theengineer's 

office and other branches of 
public service send occasional great bouquets 
of carnations and chrysanthemums in season 
to actresses and songstresses and others of the 
fair sex that appear not so publicly is not 
necessarily an indication of extravagance, 
though the floral tributes probably create as 
good an impression as though they had cost 
dollars at the llorists. All that is necessary 
if a city attache has need of a bouquet of any 
portable size, is to speak for it to the "park 
department." This prerogative applies only 
to cut flowers, for even the mayor himself 
will not by virtue of the authority in him 
vested, cause the transplanting of a root. It 
is told that one of the best known citizens of 
Los Angeles, a man well able to buy all the 
flowers he could use and who, besides, is not 
attached to the city except in the merely per- 
functory capacity of taxpayer, asktd 



Mayor Eaton to give to him an order on the 
park superintendent for a lot of nice flower 
plants to put in the citizen's yard. Mayor 
Eaton wrote the order, and, would you be- 
tieve it? The citizen did not like it. In fact, 
he took sore offense at it, all of which goes to 
show how hard it is for men in high places to 
please everybody. There was nothing in the 
order that the Mayor indited that should of- 
fend anybody. He only wrote something 
like this to Superintendent Garey: "If you 
have any old plants that you don't want and 
you have no earthly use for, and that are only 
in the way in the park, please give them to 
Mr. ." 



Whether or no the Third street tunnel 
contractor really intends to complete the big 
bore it is quite evident that he has made a 
bluff. That the tunnel can be constructed 
for the contract price even the city hall people 
have ceased affirming. That the contractor's 
bond will be drawn upon for any penalty for 
non-fulfillment of conditions therein nomi- 
nated no one seems for one moment to be- 
lieve. The idea seems to be to let things go 
in a free and eas>y way, and some day, after 
the Filipinos shall have been all pacified, 
perhaps the hill dwellers may be able to make, 
through the perforation, a short cut to and 
from town. 



On the dock at San Francisco 25,000 
pounds of beef furnished by Schweitzer it Co. 
for shipment to the Philippines on the trans- 
port Indiana was condemned 
Sea Voyage on the ground that it could 
for Siek Beef not stand the voyage. Though 
other beef shipments went 
through all right there seems to have been 
some wrong aroma in the Schweitzer case. 

"What does this mean?" asked the new 
assistant telegraph editor the other night as 
he came to this fragment of the market report 

in a sheet of other news by 
How Much wire: "Pacific Coast hops two 
// Moved fifteen." "Oh, put it in the 

earthquake department," said 
the boss; "and fill it out 'two feet and fifteen 
inches.' " 



The people that are wondering that ex- 
Congressman James McLachlan should accept 
the office of treasurer of the Whittier reform 

school would do well to re- 
Jusl Like member that the income will 

Finding Money be just like finding $50 every 

month. The duties of the 
office do not interfere with the regular busi- 
ness of the incumbent, no matter what his 
regular business may be. The appointment 
has a significance disproportionate to the 
amount of salary. 

Dan Burns on Monday last, after two 
weeks' fishing off Santa Catalina, captured an 
immense sea bass weighing 218 pounds. He 
had a great fight with the 
Dan Burns monster and landed him after 
Catches a a tussle of an hour and 

Monster forty minutes. The genial 

Dan was highly elated over 
his catch and couldn't have seemed more 
pleased had he attained the senatorship. By 
the way, the thousands over at Catalina who 
had only the newspaper cartoons of Colonel 
Burns in their minds, were greatly surprised 
in finding the victim of so many lampoonings 
so quiet, pleasant and unassuming a person. 
The Colonel and his family have been enjoy- 
ing the excellent attractions of Santa Cata- 
lina for two or three weeks and came back to 
Los Angeles on Wednesday last. 



Western Graphic 



5 









WEIR AT HEAD OF CANAL 
PICKING VALENCIA LATE ORANGES 

ELECTRIC LINE ON THE FAMOUS MAGNOLIA AVENUE 



MAIN STREET 



WHERE WATER IS KING. 

QOUTHERN CALIFORNIA'S famous cli- 
vTj mate is made so by its dry weather, its 
lack if rain. It happens sometimes, as during 
the past two reasons, that there is too much 
of this lack of moisture. All of which goes to 
prove that our fertile lands are only valuable 
where water for irrigation goes with the land; 
in fact, where the title to a good irrigation 
head of water is indisputable and always on 
tap at the wish of the owner of the land. The 
lesson of this dry season is one that will be 
learned by those who have found out by 
actual experience that water should be the 
first consideration and land secondary. The 
accompanying snap shot views illustrate 
some of the results of a first-class water right 
and an almost perfect irrigating system as in 
vogue at Riverside, the great orange growing 
center. 

Several of the illustrations are made from 
kodak views taken by one of the Graphic's 
agents during the past week, the others are 
from photos taken last October and correctly 
represent in a small way what can be done 
with a full ditch of water. 



Many inches of water have been developed 
during the past few months, thus adding 
greatly to the value of the lands of Southern 
California. Next after water with which to 
irrigate comes thorough cultivation, which 
has received more attention this summer than 
ever before, and much to the advantage of the 
orchards. Fruit growing in all its branches 
has become most profitable when followed as 
a business, but with all the attention the 
warning to the new comer is, first water and 
land afterwards. 



Largest Flower in the World. 

With the expansion of our domain we add 
to our national wonders and now it is claimed 
that the largest llower in the world is a native 
of a United States possession. It was first 
found on the island of Mindora, one of the 
Philippine group, by a (ierman botanist and 
explorer. It is a (i ve-petallcd blossom nearly 
a yard wide. At a distance the buds look like 
giant cabbage heads. A single flower has been 
known to weigh twenty two pounds. The na- 
tives call it the bolo. Specimens sent to Eu- 
Europe were recognized to be of the species 



SCENE ON MAIN CANAL 

PALM AVENUE 
RAISIN DRYING 

Rafllesia, a plant discovered in Sumatra, and 
named after the English governor of that 
island — Sir Stamford Rallies. The bolo is 
only to be found in the neighborhood of Apo, 
one of the highest volcanosjin the Philippines, 
or about 2,500 fret above the level of the sea. 
As far as we know no specimen of this giant 
llower has ever been sent to the United States. 

" Look herel Are you the man I gave a 
square meal one cold, bleak February morn- 
ing?" " I'm de man, mum." " Well, do you 
remember you promised to shovel all the 
show out of my backyard, and then sneaked 
off without doing it?" "Yes, mum, and me 
conscious smote me. Oat's de reason I 
tramped all de way here t'rough the blazing 
sun to finish de job." — Chicago News. 

Sunday-school teacher — " Who was the 
wisest man, Johnny?" Johnny — "Solomon." 
Sunday-school teacher — " That's right. Now, 
Willie, who was the strongest man?" Wil- 
lie — " Jonah." Sunday-school teacher — 
" Wrong; but what reason have you for 
believing Jonah was the strongest man?" 
Willie — " 'Cause the whale couldn't hold him 
after he got him down." — Detroit times. 



6 



Western Graphic 





]Mus»c and Hrt 




To thk Profession — A special feature of 1 he Wl ters 
Graphic i* its Department of Musi? mid Art, which is In charge 
of an experieuced and careful editor. Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and frill be published free. All communications 
should he sent in by Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Kditor of Western 
Ghaphic, Los Angeles. 

MUSIC has a hard time of it in summer. 
It is now that the muse must watch 
her disciples from many points. The mas- 
ters wander to their studios from force of 
haliit; hut it is lonesome and ere long they 
may he seen on the sands hy the sea, reading 
or planning for the winter. 

Some mix business with pleasure and 
there are several concerts on the tapis at the 
different seaside resorts. Next Friday even 
ing a musicale will he given at the Gordon 
Arms at Terminal in which numbers will be 
given by Mme. Genevra Johnstone- Bishop, 
soprano; Miss Lila Fairchilds, contralto; 
Harry H. Barnhart, basso; Miss Mary L. 
O'Donoghue, pianist. Many friends and ad- 
mirers of these musicians will avail them- 
selves of an opportunity for a jolly time. A 
feature of the event will be a special excur- 
sion by steam launch from Long Beach. 

Miss Minnie Johnson, a concert singer of 
some note, of Chicago, is spending a couple of 
months in the city. She is the guest of Mrs. 
W. F. Anderson of 123 Carr street. 

Madame (ienevra Johnstc ne-Bishop, Mrs. 
Justin Kay Toles and Mis3 June Reed will 
f-pend part of their month at Catalina. 
AT A MUSICALE 

BY CHARLES BATTELL LOOM IS 

Characters: Frank Purson, Miss Gushe, 
and one other. (After the solo. ) 

Frank Purson — Who was that? 

Miss Gushe — I don't know. Some vocal- 
izer. No temperament. 

F. P. — He might be covered with it and I 
wouldn't know. But I think that no singer 
can afford to be without it long, nowadays. 
Though a man have the voice of an angel and 
have not temperament, it profiteth him noth- 
ing. 

G— Why, that's in the Bible, isn't it? 

F. P. — Something very like it. I wonder 
who it was that sang. I liked his voice. 

G. — Oh, it wasn't anybody in particular 
(listens). Oh, I heard Mrs. Chattington say 
it was Zhan Derewski of the opera. 

F. P. — I was right in liking him. 

G. — The dear man. Wasn't it lovely. Not 
so much the voice as the way he used it. What 
temperament! 

F. P. — Yes, he seems to have had a supply 
after all. His temperament seems to grow on 
you, don't you think? 

G. — Oh, I do wish he would sing again. 

F. P. — Yes, so do I, now that I know who 
he is. 

G. — Oh, he's going to sing an encore. How 
adorable. (The man sings again.) 

F. P. — Ah, wasn t that delicious? (Sighs.) 
Oh, those Poles! They seem to be born with 
divine voices and charms of person that gen- 
erally come only after much hard work. 

G. — I can never tell whether you are jok- 
ing or not, you look so serious. Sometimes I 
think you don't really like music. 

F. P. — Oh, I adore it when so valuable a 
singer interprets it. 



G. — Oh, there's Mr. Dagby! Didn't Zhan 
sing divinely ? What a lovely tenor voice. 

Mr D. — He will when he sings. He's go- 
ing to now. That man who just sang is a 
baritone. I forget his name — hasn't much of 
a one yet — pupil of Solfari. Now Zhan be- 
gins. Shh! 

F. P. — (In a whisper.) I take back all I 
said about his temperament. Of course he 
can't have acquired it if he's only a pupil. I 
like his voice, though. 

G. — I don't. He's positively an impostor. 
— Demorest's. 

They Do Sav 

County Clerk Charlie Bell — A waitress 
should always wear a fetching costume. 

G. J. Griffith — A man seldom forgets his 
place if he has a good one. 

Mayor Eaton — Many good examples are 
set, but few of them are ever hatched. 

Dana Burks — Men glance at the past — if 
she who passed is young and pretty. 

Jigadier Brindle Otis — It's alway hard to 




HARRY H. BARNHART 
Whose rich basso will be heard in concert at The (loidon Arms, 
Terminal Island, next Friday evening. 

please a man who doesn't know what he 
wants. 

Frank Miller — Lots of people are too sel- 
fish to assist others in having a good time. 

Guy Barham, Joke No. 1,218/509— A girl's 
conversation is naturally flowery when she 
talks through her hat. 

Billy llammel — The right man in the 
right place often adds to the number of the 
sheriff's boarders. 

Frank Hicks — Life insurance is no doubt 
a good thing, but what some men need most 
is insurance against fire. 

Bob Eckert — I have my opinion of a man 
who eats mustard on pompano. 

Prof. F. .shay —Slang and baseball talk 
are the nearest some people ever come to speak- 
ing the English language. 

Justice James — The bridegroom is never of 
as much importance as the bride, and she is of 
less importance than her dress. 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MMH. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTONE-BISHOP 

WINChltT and IIKATdlUO SOLOIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

Pupil : Madame Anna de I.a (i range, Paris: Signor Bandagger, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio— Blancharp Mrsic AMD Art Bin. ding 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modini-Wood 

007 Figueroa street. 

F R E D E rTc K S TEVENSON 

VOICE 

COM POSITION 
THF.OKY 

230 hf.i. i.man Block 

THOMAS W. WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and HAKMONY 

Organist and Ciioik Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Residence ani> Sttpio 821 West 17th 



MRS. F.RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTltUCl ION 
and SOI.O PI \ N ISTK 



References: 
Blunchard Piano CO., I.. A. 
Edward Schirner. Berlin 
Moritz Moszkowski, Paris 



814 BOOTH Main Stheet, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 




J.BONDFRANCISCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
and TKACHKK 

Pupil of 

Emancel Wirtii, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 



Studio - 



bunchard building 



MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TKACHKK OF PIANO-FORTE MUSIC 

Pupil of J H. Hahn, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory of 
Music; and of II. C. Post, ilrand Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Sttdio, 133 W. Ninth St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANIST 




M RS. W. B. CLAPP 

TEACHER OF VOC4L M I 1 SIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tahernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 



FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

STUDIO. 300 Bi.anchard Bill.PINn 
M IIS. JAMES FRANKLYN COOK, Soi.0 Pianist 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Weduesday and Friday afternoons 

Reception each Monday evening 



MISS MYRTLE C A N A D Y 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and concetrs accepted. 

At Studio SPITE 316 BLANt HARD BUILDING Weduesdav, 
Residence— Thursday, Saturday, forenoons. 

California Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M 11K1 



FRED. 



A. 



BACON 



I F.ACHKR (IF VOICE CCLTVKK 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday, Thursday. Saturdav 
SPITE 31*. & 319 BLANCH A RD BUILDING 

FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTURE 
Pure Italian Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

3l. r . BLANCH ARD BUILDING 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VOICE CULTURE 
Formerly Soprano with the Hkywuod Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, BIG BI.ANCHARD Building 

ROLLA E. GARDNE R 

BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Studio, 230% South Spring St 



MISS M. C. PEARSON 

VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal culture, piano and pipe organ. Memhcr of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 1922 S. (IRANI) AVE. 

IT A R E V A L O 



M . S . 

Id lTAK LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice Culture 
Studio, 126 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and First Streets 



EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2to. r . 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Vacation at Chicago. Return ahout August loth 

ED WARD SIERRA 

OF MEXICO CONSERVATORY 

Private Lessons in 

Piano, Maniolin and Violin 204 WIL80N BLOCK 



Western Graphic 



7 




In the 6ay Life 

THE engagement is announced of Miss 
Anna Mullins of this city and Mr. H. 
B. Ainsworth of Rtdondo. This denouement 
to a very pretty romance has occasioned a 
great deal of interest socially for hoth " par- 
ties," if one may be forgiven this ortracized 
word, are very well known here in more ways 
than one. While both are members of what 
is known as " good " society, meaning, natur- 
ally the giddy whirl, yet both are likewise 
leading characters of that small and select 
circle, of which every city owns its own, in 
which intellectual culture and pursuit of the 
higher pleasures of life, are paramount to 
that elusive and fleeting class of gaiety which 
is usually supposed to be the sole aim of the 
400. Miss Mullins is happily a member of a 
music loving family and a daughter of Major 
G. G. Mullins, a highly respected resident of 
Los Angeles. Mr. Ainsworth's name is not 
among the " new " ones of this coast and 
hardly needs a comment other than that the 
present possessor is everything that is im- 
plied in "an all round good fellow." It might 
not be premature to state that the nuptials of 
this well favored pair are said to take place 
in the early fall. 

It is quite the fad in the east and has been 
for some time to call one's trap or most any- 
thing on four wheels "a wagon." It sounds 
rather smart to hear a young lady have her 
wagon ordered round, don't you think so? 
At any rate a vehicle of this description, look- 
ing very email is frequently 6een about town 
these days and conveys as its fair occupant 
one of the most popular of society's maids — 
Miss Bird Chanslor, who, while she does not 
hold the ribbons herself, looks just as smart 
as if she did. Miss Chanslor possesses many 
little accomplishments and is perhaps one of 
the most eagerly sought after members of the 
younger set of society today, her particular 
trick of manner and conversation making her 
frequently an indispensable guest at dinner, 
luncheon or house party. She has just come 
up from a visit at Mayor Eaton's at Santa 
Monica and will probably hie herself to the 
social pleasures to be found in San Francisco, 
before very long. 

Another popular society maid and one 
that will be very much missed when she takes 
that European tour, is Miss Lila Fairchild. 
It was not every one that knew Miss Fair- 
child possessed th at very charming voice she 

M I S C ELLANEO U~S 

A. M. E D E L M A N 

ARCHITECT 

Removed to BLANCH A RD MUSIC HAI.I. WILDING 
1,0s Angeles, CaL 'IV It-phono, Rerl 1:11 

G. A. D O B I N S O N 

oka H \ in it: 11NING 
VOICE a»<1 PHYSICAL CULTURE 
Studio 526 S SpRi s't Apply iiy letter or between honfi of 10-12M 



What is the difference between A GREAT 
ARTIST'S voice and that of another singer ' 

QUALITY 
What is the difference between the tone of the 

HflRDMflN piano 



and that of another make of instruments? 
QUALITY 50,000 I IN USE 

SOLE AGKNT8 

LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY 

Phone Green J444 313 S. Broadway. 

********************************** 



does, and her appearance in public at a char- 
ity affair lately was quite a surprise to a 
great many. Miss Fairchild has had things 
pretty much her own way here socially for 
some time and when hereafter she adds the 
graces that always follow with travel and the 
additional charms of a cultivated voice, a fact 
assured with such tutelage as that given by 
Madame Johnstone- Bishop with whom she is 
to travel, where, oh, where will she be, or 
rather where, oh, where will everybody else 
be? 

The first week in August sees some more 
flittings to the pleasure resorts. Mr. and Mrs. 
O. W. Childs go to Coronado today, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilber Parker are in San Francisco, 
Mr. John T. Griffith and family are off to 
Santa Monica for four weeks, and the 
Fred Griffiths are occupying their cottage 
there as usual. Judge Chapman's family are 
also putting in their three months' stay at 
Santa Monica. Mrs. Judge Gooding and her 
daughter went to Catalina on Wednesday and 
the Hollidays expect to go over next week. 
Mrs. Holliday, by the way, is getting to be 
quite an enthusiast on golf and was one of the 
leaders in the tournament at Santa Monica 
the other day. 

Mrs. Goodwin of Figueroa street will spend 
a portion of August at Avalon. 

Mrs. Fulton of Ninth street is spending a 
week or two at the Arcadia. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Gibbon have gone east 
to remain a month. 

Mrs. Arcadia Baker went to Santa Monica 
Thursday as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gaffey. 

Miss Alice Graves, who started on an 
European tour with Miss Hubbell and otber 
young ladies some three months ago, is at 
Oxford, England, from which place she has 
written a highly descriptive letter to her 
parents. 

Mr. Jevne is whiling away a few days at 
the Patterson cottage, Terminal Island. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Wigmore and family 
have taken up their summer residence at the 
Norwood, at Santa Monica, moving down on 
the first instant. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis, who are at 
Redondo, are contemplating a aea trip to San 
Francisco, for the stimulating effects of a few 
days on the bounding main, first spending a 
short period at Santa Monica and about the 
the same time at Terminal Island. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan R. Scott and fam- 
ily went to Santa Monica Tuesday to remain 
a month or more. 

The Cosmo Morgans are preparing to go 
to San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Salis- 
bury have taken the Tolhurst collage at Ter- 
minal and Dr. and Mrs. Tolhurst are back in 
town for a short time before taking another 
Hitting. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Hlinn were the guests 
of Dr. Cunningham at dinner at Santa Mon- 
ica one evening last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Willard are enjoying 
things quietly at Terminal 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Barker will go to Catalina 
next Saturday, making a party with the Hol- 
lidays for the golf tournament. 

Mrs. Orr. Harralson is at Alpine Tavern. 

Miss Christine Kurtz spent several days 
last week at Terminal, the guest of Miss 
Hitchcock. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Irvine of the famous 
Irvine Ranchoare in town and are stopping 
at the Van Nuys Broadway. They are ac- 
companied by Miss Becktel and Mrs. Plum of 
San Francisco. 



Hbout the f)ouse 

COTTAGERS at the beaches especially will 
be interested in an authority's instruc- 
tions on the preparation of lobsters. Mary 
S. Lincoln gives the following valuable hints 
in a New York paper to those who enjoy 
preparing this favorite sum- 
A Chapter merfood: Have a large kettle 
on Lobsters over the fire, with sufficient 
water to immerse the lobster; 
allow two tables poonfuls salt to four quarts 
water. When the water is boiling plunge the 
lobster head first into it, cover and boil about 
twenty-five minules for a two pound lob-ter. 
Too long cooking will make the meat dry and 
tough. 

The sense of touch and some idea of weight 
are the surest guides in making your choice. 
A large sized lobster, with thin shells, and 
which gives out something of a rattling sound 
when shaken, will not contain as much meat 
as a small one which is firm and heavy in 
proportion to its size. Try them in your hand 
and you can readily detect the difference. 
Then the freshness of the lobster may be de- 
termined by the tail, which is usually curled 
over toward the body. If the lol>ster is alive 
and in prime condition when it is put into the 
pot for boiling the tail will spring back into 
place when you bend it back. But if it stays 
back and seems flabby the lobster is stale and 
unfit to eat. To select before boiling those 
that are lively, full of motion and of medium 
size will be the best. 



When cold enough to handle wipe off the 
scum adhering to the shell, twist off the 
large claws, and, if the shells 
To Open a are thin, cut off a strip from 
Boiled Lobster the sharp edge, using a strong, 
sharp knife; then break the 
shell apart and take the meat out whole. 

If too thick to cut in this way, hold the 
claw on the edge of the table and break it 
with a mallet, being careful not to crush the 
meat. Pick out the meat in the joints. Then 
twist off the small claws and lay them aside 
for garnishing. With a sort of sideways twist 
break the tail away from the body, thus avoid- 
ing any spattering or loss of the liver. If the 
tail shell is to be used, cut through the inner 
portion and remove the meat, but if not needed 
for this purpose simply lay the tail on one 
side and crush it with your hand. This will 
snap the inner shell and allow you to remove 
the meat easily. 

Lay the outer muscle back from the middle 
and remove the vein, sometimes plainly seen 
by its dark color, sometimes almost invisible, 
but always there, running the whole length 
and terminating in a sack at the end. 

Stand the body on its head and insert hoth 
thumbs into the opening, with the right hand 
against the back shell and the left against the 
under side, and gently pull it apart, leaving 
the stomach or lady in the right hand shell. 
Shake out all of the green liver and scrape 
out any of the thick white juice. On the 
sides of the body portion are some feathery 
appendages, which are gills or lungs. These 
should be carefully removed. Break the 
body through the middle and pick out all the 
meat between the fine bones, only a table- 
spoon, perhaps, but the choicest moreel in the 
lobster. If there is any coral save it for gar- 
nishing. 



8 



Western Graphic 




THE COLONEL'S STORY 

I CAN think of no circumstances," said 
young Johnson, ''where a deliberate 
suicide could be otherwise than wrong; a vio- 
lation of the great editorial principle — 'Thou 
Shalt Not Kill!"' 

Young Johnson prided himself of his hard 
sense. It was hard sense he had. Hard to 
change. He was somewhat set in his opin- 
ions. 

The Colonel hadn't been taking part in the 
discussion. The Colonel was older than most 
of us. Hut this remark of young Johnson's 
seemed to start him thinking for he broke in 
here with — 

"I don't quite agree with you," he said, 
and a long argument ensued. The Colonel 
waxed eloquent in defending his case, but 
most of the company were against him. Then 
he took a new tack — 

''You have heard of John Savage, boys,'' 
he said. "He was a 1 i t tie before your time, I 
know, but did you ever hear the story of his 
life?" 

There were none of us who had, as I re- 
member, so the Colonel had to tell it. He be- 
gan: 

"John and I were boys together. I was 
his best man when he married. He was in 
love if ever a man was, and, well, she liked 
him pretty well, too. They were just as happy 
— as married folks can be." 

You see the Colonel was married himself 
and thought it his duty to speak cynically of 
married life before other people. 

"John wanted to spend his honeymoon in 
a new way, so they planned it for an out-of- 
the-way resort up in the country, and there 
they went. There was only one railroad any- 
where near the place. 

"We heard from them while there. They 
were in paradise. Which is a way young 
people have," said the Colonel in an aside. 

"But John's vacation came to an end; 
they had to return. They missed the regular 
train hick to the city, and had to take a slow 
old accommodation instead. Some fool left 
a switch open or something, and the train 
ran off the track and over an embankment! 

"There were very few passengers in the 
dilapidated old passenger coach, but there 
might just as well have been a hundred so far 
as John was concerned, for the first sight that 
met his eyes as he picked himself up out of 
the dirt was bis wife pinioned under the 
wreckage of half a dozen cars. You can 
imagine his frantic grief as he saw her lying 
there with a heavy truck crushing her down, 
and on top of this a great pile of twisted wood 
and iron. Her head and arms were free, but 
the rest of her body held fast. 

"The trainmen were to the rescue in a 
moment. They worked like heroes and began 
to clear away the wreckage, but, with a warn- 
ing sound, it settled, and a groan of stifled 
pain from the unhappy woman told them 
they had better stop. Meanwhile the wreck- 
ing crew at the nearest city, some twenty 
miles away, had been telegraphed for, but the 
men said it could hardly arrive in less than 
an hour. 

"All this time Savage was at his wife's 
side comforting her as best he knew how. She 
threw her arms around his neck and kissed 
him. Poor woman! she evidently koew she 
had little longer to live. Then there was an- 



other ominous sound and the wreckage set- 
tled still further, and with a moan she 
fainted. 

"John's grief knew no bounds. He tore 
around like a madman. He cuned the train- 
men one moment, the next imph red them 
most piteously to help him. They, poor fel- 
lows, felt his sorrow, too, and tried every 
means to help him. They found a spare rail 
alongside the track, a pile of cross-ties was 
placed under one end of it, and with it as a 
lever, after several attempts a portion of the 
wreckage was raised. Relieved of the pressure 
upon her, Mrs. Savage opened her eyes, just 
for a moment. But that moment, and the 
expression of those eyes was enough to inspire 
every man to do his utmost. They bore down 
still more heavily on the level, when — horror! 
one of the cross ties slipped out of place and 
the wreckage dropped down again with a 
crash! 

"Screams of agony burst from the un- 
happy woman's lips. It was an awful thing 
just to listen to them. The men stood dumb. 
They could do nothing. But John was at her 
side in an instant. 

"'Oh, John!' she cried, 'can't you put an 
end to this? Can't you put ah end to this? 
It's killing me! The pain is killing me! Put 
me out of my misery, John! My John, I beg 
of you, kill me! Kill me! I am dying by 
inches!' 

"It was torture to stand helpless by. It 
would have been a kindness to have relieved 
her of the agony by killing her. But he could 
not think of such a thing. She might not be 
fatally injured. There was the hope of the 
wrecking train. She might yet be rescued. 

'"I can't! I can't!' he gioaned. 

"The agony of the situation increased. The 
wreckage, disturbed by the lever, with a sud- 
den lurch settled again. Another scream of 
greatest pain was heard. It was a living 
death for his wife, and again and again she 
begged to be put out of her misery. There 
was nothing that could be done but wait. But 
her anguish? Could she stand the strain, the 
pain? 

"You have read about such things, gentle- 
men, but you cannot realize the anguish of 
John Savage at that moment. He felt for the 
revolver in his pocket, but his hand drew back 
abhorrently. Yet the screams of his wife 
continued to ring in his ears. 

"'John, dear, darling John!' she pleaded, 
'I can't stand it. I can't stand it. Oh, John, 
put an end to this. Kill me! Kill me! It 
would be (iod's mercy to kill me!' 

"It seemed as if a shadow ran over his 
body. He was trying to nerve himself. Some- 
thing desperate had to be done. He could 
not stand that his loved one should be in such 
misery. He was suffering almost as much as 
she. He had been sitting near her trying to 
keep her cries of distress out of his ears, but 
of a sudden he arose, before anyone could 
judge what he was doing, took his pistol from 
his pocket and gave it to her. 'I cannot do 
it,' was all he said. 

" 'Kiss me, John, dear John,' was her re- 
ply- 

"With almost frenzied passion he threw 
his arms about her. She drew him even 
closer to her. There was one long, lingering 
embrace, a word of love — and then — then 
Mrs. Savage was out of the reach of the pangs 
and pains of the world forever." 

The Colonel paused a moment to collect 
himself, and then continued: 



"Not a word was spoken. The trainmen 
stood as if dazed. Then the husband bent 
down and picked up the still smoking revol- 
ver It was but the work of an instant, be- 
fore anyone could interfere, to place it against 
his own temple — and John Savage had gone 
to join his wife." 

Again the Colonel stopped and felt for his 
handkerchief. It was rather warm in the 
room. 

"That is the story," he said. "And I don't 
think there was anything ethically, morally, 
or religiously wrong about it, either." 

And the rest of us, not even young John- 
son, had not a word to say. — The Criterion. 

gooITroads. 

THE sight-seer in England often has his 
attention called to the old Roman roads, 
which, though built over 1800 years ago, 
still show the wonderful care and masterly 
engineering ability displayed by these em- 
pire builders. Thus we see that the subject 
of good roads was agitated some few years 
ago, by people who had but little use for them 
excepting for military purposes. How much 
more far-reaching at present are the benefits 
to be derived from smooth hard roads, which 
must be considered as one of the vital points 
in a nation's economy. It has been predict- 
ed that the horseless period is confronting us; 
that the compressed air, liquid air, storage 
battery and gasoline automobiles will super- 
cede the noble animal in all transportation. 
Even if this is to be so, there is all the more 
need of good roads, but it is contended that 
in suburban and rural districts, the horse will 
always be appreciated as he is today. 

There has been a good deal of work done 
in this state during the past few years which 
points to an active concern being manifested 
by the various bodies having the highways 
under ther jurisdiction; some of this work is 
good, but a great portion shows a hap-hazard, 
let-it-run-itself management, and thousands 
of dollars have been thrown away. The 
GRAPHIC presents on the front page this week 
a photo-engraving of what may well be 
termed a model road. Stretching out nine 
miles from the city of Fresno to the Kearney 
property, this road has been turnpiked, grav- 
elled and rolled, and is lined with palms and 
shade trees. When its attractiveness he- 
comes better known, it will rival the famous 
Magnolia avenue of Riverside. Here in this 
county, the best piece of road making outside 
of the city is between Arcadia and Duarte. 
This road was cheaply built with decomposed 
granite, which is spread evenly on the soft 
soil, well rolled and wet down. Two years of 
heavy traflic have not injured this road in 
the least, and although it has not been 
sprinkled all summer, it is hard and free 
from dust. In startling contrast to this road 
is the one through the San Fernando 
valley. Here the gravel has been dumped 
from the wagons on a steep turnpike, making 
a strip about ten feet wide — and then the road 
was complete. As a result in two weeks it 
resembled a letter W, and the under soil is 
working into the strata of gravel, so that 
when the rains come, what is left of the sand 
will be carried down the steep sides — and it 
will all have to be done over again. One-half 
mile of good road could be made each year in 
a township and kept in condition. We advo- 
cate the " half-a-loaf " proposition, but be- 
lieve that the small portion should be of good 
quality. 



Western Graphic 



SANTA MONICA 



•%^H^'fe-»!'^.^'fe--tfc'V.-*:N 



Hotel Arcadia 




SANTA MONICA 
CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 

Koom 
The Dining 

Room 
The l'arlors 
I All Look 
Toward tho Sea 

It seems u> me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles blow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound. 
And I'd have stillness all mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 1 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide. 
Where air is puie and heart is free, 
1 hat's surety where I'd like to he. 
If 't Weren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
But when it comes to getting rest 
I like the coutuiy lots the best. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue. 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

— Eugeue Field, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts continued 



Frank A. Miller 
| "Prop. 




HOMES 

BY THE SE,fl 



Ocean 
Pp rk 



KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 
Ocean front, Flegant beach, Water piped to tract, 
ilectrie light connection. Long lease, SIO to $25 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever Offered to secure a >-anta 
Monica Home 

Ocean Air Ocean Beach Ocean Bathing 

L. B. OSbORN, Agent 

Office, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



Fine Fish 
Dinners 



No tourist considers a visit to California 
complete until he has vi-ilcd >anta Monica and 
no one seeking a Summer Keaolt thinks of over- 
looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ex- 
tended ti-.e fame of the excellent fish, clams, 
mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc . which are to be 
obtained at the famous nslaurant, overlooking 
the ocean. 

THE PAVILION 




% Championship Swimming Race 

I at Santa Monica | 

X A half-mile race in the open ocean, for good W 

$ purses. Best two in three heats. Second heat Sun- ^ 

<i> day, Aug. 6, 1.30 p m The course may be seen 

T from the verandahs of the North Beach Bath 

%, Douse. The plunge is emptied and cleaned I 

hi thoroughly every night. The water is kept at 'ji 

$ 82 degrees. The beach is at all times clean, S 

\ (juiet and orderly, and has more permanent % 

9> attractions than any other resort. Everybody W 

2g is remarking the great improvement ovt r all X 
preceding years. # 



I OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST., Ixis Angeles, every thirty mln- 
¥ utesonthe hour and half hour lrom 0.30 a in. to 7 JO 
p.m., 8.30. 9.80, 10.:s0, 11.30. 

LEAVE HANI) STAND, Santa Monica, every hair 
hour on the quarter and three quarter from MS a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.15, 9.45, UM >. 



A Police Commissioner — Some men avoid 
a disagreeable task by purBuading themselves 
that its accomplishment is an impossibility. 




vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 




SANTA MONICA 

CAN conceive of no more animated 
anatomical sight than that pre- 
sented in the sands in front of the 
North Beach hath house on a Sun- 
day forenoon between tho hours of eleven and 
twelve. There are multitudes of all kinds 
and conditions of people. There is warmth 
and sunshine and a fresh smell from the salty 
sea. A brisk breeze from the northwest sends 
the white-capped waves dancing in from the 
sharp line of the horizon, above which linger 
thin rolls of flesh tinted clouds. The sun 
shines down on the sands and makes them 
yellow, and brightens the pinks and the reds 
and the blues of the spick -and-span frock-, 
and the wind blows out the ribbons and 
(lowers in fluffy shirt waists and natty 
chapeaus. No impres-sionist ever painted 
prettier purple of sky or deeper blue of water 
or jollier squads of variegated men and 
women. In all these thousands there isn't a 
single miserable one. The delicious warmth 
is impregnated with health-giving breaths 
from off the tumbling waves which waft their 
ozone in shore. There are animating kalido- 
scopic colors that would shame a prism, and 
the deep roar and swash and gurgle of the 
never resting breakers are oratorios that can- 
not be properly imitated. 

Last Sunday was the banner day of the 
season and all the bath houses were out of 
suits before all who wished had enjoyed their 
dips. But a beach crowd is good natured 
and the disappointed ones forgot their troubles 
watching the more fortunate ones frolicking 
in the surf. At 1:30 the wharfs and bluffs 
were thick with people watching the first heat 
of the swimming race. 

Mrs. Walter Cosby and two children, Miss 
Bird Chanslor, Mrs. George Steckel, Mrs. M. 
A. Wilcox, Mrs. M. E. Longstreet ; Alfred H. 
Wilcox and Mr. and Mrs. Guy H. Cochran, 
are among the late arrivals at the Arcadia. 

Tomorrow (Saturday) a golf tournament 
will be held on the Ocean Park links. Mrs. 
Roy Jones will preside at the tea tables and 
the prizes will be given by Mmcs. Abbot Kin- 
ney and T. H. Dudley. 

Hotel Arcadia is of necessity the center of 
gravitation after nightfall, and hardly an 
evening passes without some Eort of enter- 
tainment under its hospitable roof. Tuesday 
evening the hotel guests enjoyed a house 
party, with a cake walk, dancing and the 
usual refreshments. 

The Casino tennis courts are the scene of 
constant practicing by those who are to con- 
test in the tournament commencing on Au- 
gust 11. 

One of the biggest improvements projected 
since the building of the electric road is the 
proposed beach trolley line to Kedondo, and 
possibly on around the beach to San Pedro, 
Terminal and Long Beach. Abbot Kinney 
is one of the capitalists interested in the com- 
pany whose final papers of incorporation are 
now being prepared. Aside from the alluring 
feature of a ride along the very edge of the 



surf, which alone would insure the success of 
the enterprise, a large area of beach land, now 
unavailable, will be brought in close commu- 
nication witli Los Angeles and the two seaside 
cities, and it is not an idle dream to look for- 
ward to the time when a continuous row of 
cottages will look out upon the bay along the 
entire route of this novel railway. At a point 
on the line the company will make extensive 
improvements, including a t- porting park, ath- 
letic track, bath houses, etc., which will doubt- 
less become the nucleus for a new town. 



CORONADO 

" I "HERE is more life and gayety at Coro- 
A nado at present than at any former time 
during the present season. Every one is en- 
joying himself to the utmost. The days are 
happy links in pleasures chain. From Mon- 
day morning till the social hops of Saturday 
evening calls a halt life is full of various 
pleasures. The ocean and the plunge are fa- 
vorite entertainers, a part of each day, while 
golf and tennis claim a share of the day's at- 
tention. If the Crown of the Pacific, Coro- 
nado, doesn't fit and bring pleasure to the 
wearer it is because that particular morial is 
suffering from rheumatism, the gout or indi- 
gestion. In either case, if he keeps on taking 
"Coronado" and doing Coronado's bidding in 
regard to outdoor life and exercise, even the 
melancholy will soon be heard to sing in 
praise and delight of life upon the beach as 
health's restorer. The ocean is not the only 
entertainer of swells, for the plunge is claim- 
ing the attention of crowds each day, and 
though the bay allures many of the younger 
swimmers, there are always those who prefer a 
morning in the pool to tempting the 1'acific in 
natural condition. 

Golfl golfl goli! Who doesn't play golf? 
Few respond. It is easy to tell the newcomers 
to the beach. They may be classified, tick- 
eted and labelled according to the depth of 
tan they so proudly wear. If there is any vir- 
tue »n sun-companionship, mingled with sea 
breezes and contact with mother earth, those 
who inhabit the golf links on the beach are 
sure to come out beings of muscle and sinew 
at the close of the present season. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. I*. I'osey and sons of Los 
Angeles are summering atCoronado, guests of 
the hotel. 

Mis. Alfred Abbey, dramatic soprano of 
San Francisco, is a recent arrival at the hotel. 

Madame Modjeska and Count Bozenta are 
spending August at the hotel, as has been their 
custom in seasons past. 

J. B. A bell, business manager of the Los 
Angeles Express, and E. E. Upp of Toledo, O., 
were recent visitors at Coronado. 

Mrs. Rosa Egeman, ex-president of the 
Woman's National Scientific Association, has 
taken a cottage on the beach and will re- 
main some time, accompanied by her family. 

Prof. Flugel, at the head of the German 
department of Leland Stanford University, 
accompanied by his wife and family, are sum- 
mering at Coronado. 

The extension of the jetty, at Hotel del 
Coronado, is progressing rapidly. Twelve piles 



LO 



Western Graphic 



per day are being driven, and 250 feet of the 
proposed 400 feet have been accomplished 
already. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Harris gave the largest 
and most successful launch party of the past 
week. 

The summer girl is an expert with the rod 
and reel and understands the art of rowing as 
well as the handling of golf sticks. Verily the 
maiden of today, with her merry cheek and 
various athletic tendencies, with her health 
and freedom in short skirts and comfortable 
shoes, would be a mighty surprise to dear de- 
parted grandparents, who never in their most 
extravagant day dreams became acquainted 
with the maid of today. 

Mrs. Charles .lacoby and Miss Irma Jacoby 
of Los Angeles are enjoying life at Hotel del 
Coronado. 

Mrs. Isabel le S. Ware, Mrs A. W. Morgan 
and Miss Isabelle \V. Morgan, leave Monday 
to ppend August in Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Stocking of Los Ange- 
les are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Stock- 
ing of Corodado. 

Mrs. F. S. Hicks of Los Angeles, child and 
nurse, also Mrs. Hicks' brother, Stephen V. 
Childs, are spending August at Hotel del 
Coronado. 

CATALINA ISLAND 

ALL things come to him who waits— so at 
least thought the redoubtable Dan 
Burns, when, after going out after big fish 
nearly every day for two weeks and patiently 
holding his rod at a proper angle, a monster 
sea bass weighing more than two hundred 
pounds, " struck " and was captured after a 
two hours' fight. The exact weight was 218 
pounds; and shortly after the arrival of the 
colonel and his captive he and the big bass 
were photographed. 

The crowds here are very large and on 
Saturday and Sunday last were enormous; 
and among the new comers on Saturday were 
Major B. C. Truman, wife and daughter, who 
staid until Thursday, taking in all that could 
be aggregated in so short a time. The Major 
takes with him for Paris a mounted tuna 
weighing 9G pounds, a wild goat's head, and 
some mounted photographs of big fish and 
other pictures. 

The weather is simply delicious, the blend 
of warmth and mild wind bein<, perfect. The 
verandas of the Metropole are crowded away 
into night; the procession of bathers and golf- 
ers take up a good portion of each day; 
thousands go out vachting and fishing daily 
and attend the Catalina band concerts each 
evening, and there is much else that contrib- 
utes toward a panorama that possibly has no 
rival in America. 

Among the permanent guests at the Metro- 
pole are professor and Mrs. Holder. The 
professor is one of the best bred and culti- 
vated gentlemen in America, and is held in 
high esteem by all who enjoy his acquaint- 
ance. He is now adding to the aquaria many 
notable marine subjects and otherwise devot- 
ing himself to ichthyological pursuits. Pro- 
fessor Holder's contributions to eastern mag- 
azines and newspapers like the New York 
Times and Boston Transcript are of the high- 
est class and are as generally entertaining as 
they are scientific and instructive. 

Guy Barham has been luxuriating at 
Santa Catalina for nearly two weeks and has 
been the observed of all observers, not even 
excepting Dan Burns, who has been chape- 
roned by the immaculate Guy, the Beau 



Brummel of the season thus far at Avalon. 
This young man of elegant leisure reminds 
one of Dazzle in Boucicault's London Assur- 
ance, and while he never toils he spins around 
among statesmen, army and navy men, club 
and literary men, old maid and damsel, 
widow and wife with such charming non- 
chalance as to bewilder the average veranda 
lounger and yachtsman. He carries the new- 
est novel wherever he goes, is up in all the 
jest and frivolity of the passing hour, is 
always serene and sober, changes his clothes 
four times a day, take3 a hand at golf, pool 
or cards, can row, swim and dance, and is 
an all round butterfly at a seaside resort such 
as most the women like and all men won- 
der at. 

Capt. W. Waterhouse anchored his yacht 
Alert in the harbor Monday night on his way 
with some friends for a cruise to San Clemente. 
The Captain being a Pasadenan his friends 
are all from the Crown City, including; Paul 
Waterhouse, Gerald Waterhouse, James A. 
Leonard, D. M. Jones, H. Goehegan, Dan Mc- 
Kenzie, W. F. Bosbyshell, Charles Whalen 
and Frederick S. Rhoerig. 

The aqurium daily becomes more fascinat- 
ing with its wonders from the sea. A pink 
umbrella fish is one of the latest additions to 
the family. It is of a beautiful pink color 
and has tentacles nearly four feet long. A 
hermit crab in his shell house is a decided 
curiosity as he has to be fed on account of his 
helplessness. 

REDONDO 

THERE has been something special in the 
way of social gaiety at Hotel Redondo 
each evening this week, and the week's festiv- 
ities will auspiciously close with a full dress 
ball this evening, given in connection with 
the open golf tournament held Friday and 
Saturday inclusive on the Redondo Country 
Club's link. The first cotillion of the season 
was given Saturday evening of last week and 
was the most enjoyable social function yet 
this season. Twenty-six couple participated 
and the germ an was led by Wm. Watson 
Lovett. Mr. Lovett distinguished himslf in this 
direction, introducing new figures and made 
the affair enjoyable for every one. The favors, 
which were furnished by the guests of the 
hotel, were both pretty and appropriate. At 
the conclusion of the dancing an elaborate 
collation was served in the small dining room. 
Those dancing were Mr. and Mrs. Lovett, Miss 
Fairchild, Tom Craig, Jos. G. Easton, Miss 
Hambrook, D. D. Acker, Miss Bassett, Homan 
Hallett, Miss Lucy Carson, W. R.Norris, Miss 
Waddell, Paul Rowan, Miss Carson, Wm. 
Young, Miss Wainwright, W. W. Leithead, 
Miss Sargent, H. B. Ainsworth, Miss Seymour, 
Warren Carhart, Miss Carpenter, R. A.Rowan 
Miss Benton, I. H. Rice, Miss Ridgeway, Mr # 
Field, Miss McFarland, Mr. Stephens, Miss 
Bumiller, C. T. Sutton, Mrs. Acker, F. G 
Schumacher, Mrs. Winston, Mrs. Wagner, 
Gregory Perkins Jr., Mrs. Winslow, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bundrum, Mr. and Mrs. Osburn, S. M. 
Haskins, Miss Stephens, W. Stephens, Miss 
Florence Jones, C. Allen, and Miss Burke. 

Mesdames Gilbert F. Gay, F. H. Seymour. 
Alex. Dick and C. R. Craig presided at the 
table favors. 

Monday evening a swimming party was 
given at the plunge which included the 
younger guests of the hotel, after which Mr. 
and Mrs, Alexander Dick, who have been at 
the hotel three months, gave an elaborate 



chaffing dish supper which was in the nature 
of a farewell jollification as they leave next 
week for their home in Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Tuesday evening one of the prettiest par- 
ties of the year was given in the ball room, 
the occasion being a dove cotillion, twenty- 
four ladies participating. The twelve ladies 
acting as gentlemen were easily distin- 
guished by white pique skirts, white shirt 
waists and manish collars and ties while the 
ladies were in full evening dress. The men 
were Mesdames Warner, Osburn, Winslow, 
Misses Seymour, Hallett, Waddell, Hambrook 

SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 

^anta catalina isianfll 



Three and one-half hours from l.os 

The Greatest Resoil 

The Loveliest Season oft lie Year 

Climate near Perfection 

1'h i* u omenal Fishing and Hunting 

The great Stage Bide 

""■"m* HOTEL 

ArTOINT.M knts 



A i» %e I e h 



METROPOLE f 



I ii iii ue exclusive attractions 

The Pained Marine (.allien- iih viewed 

from the glass bottomed boa s 
The best and moat picturesque Golf Link* 
Hound trip everyday from l.os Angeles 
Bnnday excursions, three hours on the Island 
See K. K. time tables 



For full information, illustrated painphle's and 
rates apply to 



Tel. M 3b 



BANNING CO. | 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 



«^<*Ai(Mii<i^ (evpk <«m <dr=7». ^^.<dr : ?*.(*m<sm | i«mi> 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE. GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 



Hotel jist Completed ^^^^^^ 

Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 

jjfti. Bath house in connec- 
Rates #'J to *4 a day fifiS Hon with hotel. Finest 

r~t • « loii a 1 1 . 1 t 



Special rates on beach and surf bathing on .; 
application gfi f oast l gplf links, yacht- j 
SiiS nig, lishinc Ten miles of ! 



S. P. Anderson 



Manager 



'J/tV, fine roadway along beach 
3H3 for bicycling. 



T he Attractive Route 

To the Favorite Sea Side 
Resorts is the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




Terminal Island, BytheSea 
Catalina Island San Pedro 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and 

most delightful places 
and only a short ride from Los Angeles, where can be 
found the finest Open Sea Bathing, Yachting and 
Fishing on the Pacific coast. 

Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket 
Office. 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. 
S. B. Hynks, Gen. Mgr. T. C. Peck, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept. 



Western Graphic 



11 



R E DO N D O 



vvvvvvvvvvvv vvvvvvv vvvvvv* vvvvvvvv 




L • 



ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 
FROM LOS ANGELES 




)» 
* 

If 



9 
* 

If 

* 
* 

* 

* 

ft* 



Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 



Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn- 
aments. 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 



Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 



Transient Rates S2.50 to *4. 
Special Weekly Rates 



H. R. WARNER, Prop 
«««*A««ft«ftft««ftttftftftftftftft*ftftftftftftft*ft 




Santa Fe Route 



5.85 p. m. 
6.10 p. m. 



Summer Time Table 

Daily Sekvice 
Leaves Los Angeles 9.55 a. m. 1.30 p. in. 
Arrives at Redondo 111 85 a. TO, 2.10p.m. 

Sunday service 

Leaves Los Angeles 8.30 a. m. 9.55 a. m. 

1.30 p.m. 5.35 p. ra. 7.00 p.m. 
Arrives nt Redoi do 9.10a. m. 10.35 a. m. 

2.10 p.m. 6.10 p. m. 7 40 p.m. 

Last Train Returning Leaves Redondo 8.00 p. m. 

Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Ca rd 

In effect June 4, 1899! © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Everyday 9.30 am 1.30 pm 5.30 pm 
Sundays 8.10 am 9.30 am 10.45 am 
1.30 pm 5.30 pm 7.00 p. rn 
Trains leave Redondo for Los Angeles 

Everyday x.00 a m II. 00am 1.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a m 8.00 a m 9.30 a m 
1 1 .00 a m 1.15 pm 5.45 p m 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Redondo 8.80pm 
returning leaves I,or Angele-i 11.30 p m 

City Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

L. J. PERRY, Superintendent 



BUNDY'S 



'> i,i > , ^>": i >" '.»» » 

Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottages Lighted by Acety- 
lene Gas. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



l Elsinore 
Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z UNOY, Prop- 
Bates per week -88, 89, and 810, lnclud 
lng Hot Sulphur Bathg. No Con- 
sumptives taken : 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 



Seabert, Ridgeway, Susie Carpenter, McFar- 
land; the ladies were Mesdames Lovett, Dick, 
Acker a nd Winston, and Misses Wainwright, 
Carpenter, Bumiller, Sargent, Sprecher, Bas- 
sett, Hattie Ridgeway, Stella Bumiller and 
Mueller. Mrs. M. L. Sargent and Mrs. (Jay 
presided over the favors which were dainty or 
comical according to the inclination of the 
giver. 

Other frivolities of the week were a pro- 
gressive euchre party Wednesday evening, a 
tacky party Thursday evening upon which 
occasion everyone taking part got themselves 
up in the most grotesque and ridiculous cos- 
tume possible, and a plunge party Friday 
evening. 

Among Los Angeles people at Redondo 
Hotel this week were Dr. and Mrs. Monroe, 
Major Ben C. Truman, Miss Georgia Truman 
W. Durett Moore, C. P. Donnell, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bundrum, Miss Helen Fairchild, Miss Lila 
Fairchild, Miss Bumiller, Miss Edna Bumil- 
ler, Miss Stella Bumiller, Ceo. D. Blake, John 
Chanslor, Mrs. A. M. Stephens, Miss Thorn, 
Miss Stephens, Miss Florence Jones, Wm. 
Stephens, Albert M. Stephens, Mrs. W. R. 
Burke, Miss Burke, Jos. G. Easton, Wm. 
Young, Mrs. Fred O. Johnson, Milo Johnson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin H. Rice, Warren Carhart, 
Maye Stephens, Gregory Perkins Jr., C. S. 
Sprecher, Blanche Sprecher, Edw. L. May- 
berry, Tom Craig, Thos. Reynolds, F. G.Schu- 
macher, Paul Rowan, S. M. Haskins, C.Allen, 
R. A. Rowan, A. Borden, W. W. Beestett, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Borden, children and 
maid, Mrs. M. C. Burnett, James W. Macdon- 
ald, Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Donnelly, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. T. Bishop. C. H. Berry, Miss Gertie 
Swift, Mrs. Curtis, Mrs. C. Bumiller Hicky, 
Mrs. A. H. Antelia, Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby 
Rodman, Mrs. Herman Baruch, Mr. and Mrs. 
L. F. Claik, H. P. Strate, Miss A. Koons, R.S. 
Yeza, Mrs. M.Howard, Mrs. Kafherine Melius, 
Arthur Howard, Herbert Howard, Mrs. G. D. 
Cadwallader, and Mrs. Theodore Royer. 

The open golf tournament which is in 
progress on the Redondo Country Club's links 
is attracting great attention from golf players 
and silver cups will be awarded the champion- 
ship winners and silver medals to the seconds 
in the all-comers competition. Suitable 
prizes will be given in handicap and other 
events. The tournament opened yesterday 
morning and will be concluded today. 

The Fourth of July committee, H. T. Haz- 
ard, chairman; George B. Beebe, secretary; 
W. S. Daubenspeck, treasurer; George A. Al- 
len, F. J. Cressey, J. J. Gosper, Dr. R. W. 
Miller, John A. West and W. H. Workman 
deserve the heartiest kind of a rising-to-your- 
feet vote of thanks for their patriotic services 
in giving the people a chance to duly cele- 
brate. The fellow, however, who got the 
$401.49 for fireworks was overpaid just four 
hundred and sixty dollars. 

In the tussle at Long Beach between the 
preachers and young folks who like to dance 
as to the number of evenings each week that 
shall be allowed for dancing, they divided, 
giving over four nights out of the week to 
preaching and three nights to the dance. The 
preachers, so it is reported, wish to compro- 
promise further by allowing two evenings for 
the dance and that a collection be taken up at 
same for the benefit of the preachers. The 
QbAPHIC does not believe the collection part 
of the story, although that might give a semi- 
religiouB aspect to the dance. 




frou-frou'3 Chat 

Of the fads And fashions of Hoth Sexes 

\ T 0\V that tattooing has been revived as 
-J- 1 a fad among women I wonder how 
soon we may see serpent signs and oriental 
emblems indellibly worked out in striking 
colors on the arms of some of our fair sex of 
the Angel city. I remember what an awful 
impression was made upon me several years 
ago in San Francisco. I was attending a very 
recherche and extremely dressy affair. All 
at once my attention was arrested by what 
appeared to be at first glance a live snake 
coiled around one of the wrists of a very 
striking and handsome girl near me. Of 
course, upon second thought I realized that it 
was artificial, although it was such a fine 
piece of work that at a little distance it was 
almost impossible to tell whether or no it was 
really alive. 



How many times we hear the remark: 
"Oh, I never tried to make anything except 
perhaps a little cotton shirt waist." 

It may seem a very simple thing to make 
a shirt waist, but on the contrary a shirt 
waist should be as carefully fitted and con- 
scientiously finished as anything else. Al- 
though there has been a great change for the 
better in the popular summer shirt waists 
there is ample opportunity for still more im- 
provement. 



The time has not quite arrived when we 
discuss the rivalry between the automobiles 
and the bicycles but it is fast approaching 
and while we are waiting for the automobiles 
we will not forget our bikes. Here is a dis- 
cription for a bicycle costume which I think 
would be very neat for general use. A shirt 
of vanilla color, corkscrew cloth with shaped 
flounce rising up on the left side and fasten- 
ing along the side with hooks and eyes, show- 
ing a lining of old pink taffata; jacket with 
round basques, very short plain collar, and 
lapels stitched. White livery pique scarf. 
For the feet the prettiest wear is deer skin 
half boots, yellow or drab. 

About a Summer Word 

The most expensive word that can prop- 
erly be applied to a woman is the word 
"dainty." A woman may be stylish, well 
dressed, good looking, half a hundred other 
thing without any considerable amount of ex- 
pense, but to live up to the requirement-? of 
the word "dainty" means that the person 80 
designated has leisure absolutely unen- 
croached upon; it means money plentifully 
supplied, a taste unspoiled by a desire for ex- 
travagance of color or form. 

"Dainty" means all these and many other 
things. It means absolute freshness of ma- 
terial, of ribbons, lace a , muslin, garnitures 
of all kinds. It meansorgandies uncrumpled, 
rulfles fresh from laundering, laces unspotted 
from the world and from everything else, wa- 
ter, soap, starch in abundance. 

Look through the list of your acquain- 
tances and you will not find more than two or 
three to whom the word can be applied with 
truth. It is a word which a man loves to ap- 
ply to his sweetheart; it is a word which a 
woman dreams sometime of possessing. It 
has no age limit, for it can belong to the child 
or the woman of eighty. What it does re- 
quire, however, is that its owner shall be one 
of Fortune's favorites. 



12 



JVational Guardsmen 

CONDUCTED BY SHIRLEY L. HOLT 

MEMBERS of the Guard re-enlisting, 
as well as new members, have been 
required to pass a physical examination by a 
surgeon. The question of the legality of this 
requirement has been raised by Col. Berry 
who finds no orders from general headquarters 
authorizing or requiring it. An order was 
issued from division headquarters, in October, 
1898, reciting the fact that it had been de- 
cided by the commander-in-chief and the 
board of location and organization that all 
applicants, before being enlisted, should pass 
such examination, but no record appears that 
such a requirement was authorized by general 
headquarters, which would be necessary to 
give it the force of law. The question becomes 
imp>rtant because, in a few cases in the Sev- 
enth Infantry, where there was not time to 
examine ihe applicants within the limits fixed 
for reporting for duty, the men were sworn in 
and the examinations made afterwards. If 
the requirement for the physical examination 
had the force of law, which it would have if 
embodied in a general order, the enlistment of 
those men would be null and void, but in the 
absence of the requirement the enlistments 
would be valid. The opinion of general head- 
quarters has been asked upon the question. 

In connection with the recent inspection 
and muster of the Seventh Regiment, Col. J. 
R. Berry, who inspected Companies B, I and 
L, made some excellent recommendations, 
among which are the following: (1) That 
company commanders he relieved of obsolete 
and unserviceable property, such as the old 
full-dresn uniforms, etc. (2) That new uni- 
forms, obtained if possible from the 0. S. 
Government, be furnished as soon as possible, 
and that each man be supplied with a brown 
duck as well as a blue fatigue uniform, which 
would enable the men to take much better 
care of their blue uniforms; and that the cap 
be omitted. (3) That the State furnish each 
company with a set of re-loading tools, shells, 
powder, etc., which would enable the men to 
get a great deal of target practice at a small 
expense. It is also recommended that more 
attention be given to silhouette firing. The 
Colonel joins in the recommendation of Major 
F. C. Prescott, who inspected Companies G 
and K, that candidates for appointment as 
non-commissioned officers be examined by a 
board of officers detailed from other compa- 
nies than the one in which they seek appoint- 
ment — the theory of this being that it would 
relieve company commanders of the embarass- 
ment of personal friendship in making ap- 
pointments. Men would take more pride in 
an appointment which they had earned, and 
promotion would be open to all who had the 
ambition to try for it. For this purpose it is 
recommended that libraries of standard mil- 
itary books should be provided and made ac- 
cessible to all members of the companies. 



Col. John R. Berry sent a communication 
so general headquarters requesting to be in- 
formed whether he might recommend the ap- 
pointment of a regimental quartermaster with 
the rank of captain, the rank authorized by 
law re-organizing the U. S. army. The ruling 
of the adjutant-general was that it would not 
be expedient to change the rank of any officer 



Western Graphic 

that has been definitely fixed by the legisla- 
ture, and especially as it would not be prac- 
ticable to make the entire commisioned force 
and the numerical strength of companies cor- 
respond to that of the U. S. army as re-organ- 
ized under the Act of March 2nd, 1890 — the 
only portions of the U. S. Army Regulations 
considered applicable to the Guard at the 
present time being those which relate to the 
insignia of rank. 



Lieut. John Eason of San Francisco, form- 
erly captain of Company M of Riverside, has 
been visiting friends in Southern California 
for the past two weeks. The Lieutenant left 
for the north the first of the week. 



Captain H. T. Matthews, who has recently 
received a commission in the Thirty-Fifth Reg- 
iment, left for Vancouver Barracks last Sat- 
urday. He took the trunk of Lieut. Samuel 
Crawford with him — the Lieutenant being 
anxious to get at least a po. tion of his equip- 
ment to the front. 



Some time ago an order w;is issued chang- 
ing the color of the chevrons and stripes of 
Signal Corps from orange to black, that being 
the color used in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. 
The boys are now making the change, although 
there is some dissatisfaction regarding it. The 
black is not as showy and handsome as the 
orange and a non-commissioned officer cannot 
be distinguished from a private at a distance. 



Lieut. Louis S. Chappelear of the Thirty 
Fifth U. S. V. Infantry has been detailed as 
assistant recruiting officer in this city, and he 
expects to procure a great many enlistments 
from among his many acquaintances in the 
Seventh Regiment. Those who desire to en- 
list should do so at once, for the early bird 
catches the worm, and those who get into the 
Thirty-Fifth Regiment now will have an ex- 
cellent chance to secure good appointment*. 
Lieut. Chappelear's headquarters are at the 
U. S. Recruiting office in the Bullard b'ock. 



Last week's issue of the WESTERN GRAPHIC 
cantained a very interesting Manila letter, 
written by George Oden,a Los Angeles boy in 
the Third Artillery. He is a regular corres- 
pondent of this journal and those who desire 
reliable information regarding the work being 
done in the Philippines and the latest authen- 
tic news of the militia of Southern California, 
should send in their subscriptions for the 
Western Graphic. 



A corps of lorty men of the Engineer Di- 
vision of the Naval Militia has been organ- 
ized in this city by Lieut. Van Vleck. The 
corps held its first meeting for the purpose 
of completing its organization last Wednes- 
day evening. About the first of September 
they expect to take a ten days' cruise on a 
U. S. Cruiser. Lieut. Halpin, formerly of 
the British navy, is taking quite an interest 
in the corps and will aid them a great deal 
in their work. 

Next week the men of the Seventh Regi- 
ment will be measured for uniforms, which 
will probably be received in about two 
months. This will be good news for the 
boys as a majority of them have no uniforms 
at all. 



The officers of the First Brigade gave 
Captain George Lawrence a Banquet last 
Tuesday evening. The captain left on Wed- 
nesday for a weeks' outing at Catalina. 



The Signal Corps of the First Brigade ex 
pect to go into camp for ten days about the 
15th of this month, at Catalina Island. The 
corps will be under the command of Lieut. 
Sabine. 



Capt. Bowers of San Diego, who is an officer 
on the staff of Brigadier-(Jeneral C. F. A. 
Last, is visiting in the city. 



;L MlTif»E ; 

Seventh and Olive Sts., Los Angeles f 




-J -11131 



EUROPEAN PLAN— 60 Rooms 
ELEGANT SUITS Rates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Pass t lie Doors 



Correspond nre 

Promptly 

Answered 



i . ii. HeGONEGA I 



Proprietor 0) 



DRINK 

GLEN 



Main Office Newberry's Crystal Water 
216S. Spring St 



ROCK * 

A Pure Mountain Spring J 



«*«*«**«*««««*«««**«*«****«««««*«« 




Photo- 
graphic 
Supplies I 



* 
* 

» 
» 



Cel. ID. 1291 



W. W. SWEENEY 

Kxpert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hoe- 
iery and Alidomlnal Supporters. the only 
manufacturer in S. Cnhfornia. Rtmember the 
number, 213 W. Fourth St. 



7^1%^ ^ 1 ^ ^ ^ Cor. FIRST and 

cne palace spring sts. 

A Select Family Re-ort 

Patronised by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly titled, cool in Summer 
and warm In Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance. Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Restaurant anil Refreshments 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 



NEW BRUSSELS CARPETS 

55c, 65c to 90c vd, 
NEW INGRAIN CARPETS 
DOOj 65o to 76c yd. 
LINOLEUM OILCLOTH 

40c to 90c. 25c to 50c 

REFRIGERATORS *5, *7.50 to $20 

I. T. MAKTIN, 531-535 So. Soring SI. 
Wheel Chairs sold or rented. 




Western Graphic 



1:; 




ONE far sighted, particularly bright banker 
of the East, Cyrus Newkirk, now liv- 
ing near San Bernardino on his fine orange 
ranch, remarked to the writer the past week: 
"How your city does grow. I have watched 
Los Angeles for several years 
Some Rosy and would have settled here, 
Prospects but I am getting too old and 

decided to enjoy my last days 
surrounded by orange trees, which is also a 
business that is most profitable for the invest- 
ment. But I could see a great future for Los 
Angeles. In fact it has exceeded my expecta- 
tions. The future, other things being equal, 
will be greater in the years to come than in 
the past. I will not undertake to give figures 
as to population, but one thing is certain, this 
is sure to be a great city. Just look at its 
geographical position as to the world's trade, 
the relation of the Nicaragua Canal to this 
coast, to the great Southwest, surrounded with 
the richest lands in the world, subject to most 
diversified culture. Water from the moun- 
tains, utilized over and over for power, can 
then be poured out on the land when it is 
needed and in quantity necessary. Why, sir, 
this is the coming city of the Pacific Coast." 

"The judgment is affirmed." With these 
words Judge Smith administered the coup de 
grace to the slot machines, and nevermore 
will the seductive whirr of the little play- 
things lure the nickels from the passer-by. It 
is well, from two points of view. In the first 



place there is no question but that the vicious 
nickel eaters were pernicious in their influence 
and in many instances downright robbing de- 
vices. Second!)', it is the beginning of a gen- 
eral annihilation of the machines, which will 
afford a large opportunity for brains to evolve 
something to take their places. 

Notwithstanding the higher prices for all 
building material as well as for labor, new 
houses are going up all over the city. The 
quality of residence buildings is good, no 
shanties are being put up. Even the small 
home is a tasty cottage, an ornament to the 
locality. 

Nature has been more than generous, even 
after a dry season, to the fruit growers who 
have aided her by their work of intense cul- 
ture. This season's fruits are mostly of a 
liner quality than ever before. The local 
markets of this city have taken large quanti- 
ties of the best fruits at fancy prices while 
the balance has been or will be canned or 
dried. 



"Where are you going, my pretty maid?" 
"I'm going a-berrying, sir," she said. 
"Who's to be buried, my pretty maid?" 
"It's none of your funeral, sir," she said. 



The apricot crop of Orange county has 
been dried instead of canned or sold green 
(ripe). It is claimed that the price paid 
($27.50 a ton or 1^ cents a pound at the can- 
nery) is equivalent to 7 cents a pound for th e 



dried fruit, whereas 9 and I) \ cents is now 
offered. At these figures it is easy to see 
which is the best for the grower. The highest 
price paid for canning has been $80 a ton. 
The best prices for apricots dried have netted 
the growers $50 a ton for the green fruit. 
Where is the croaker now? 



The oil output for this county for the 
past year, July 1, 1809, amounts to over one 
and a half million dollars. This is one of 
the products largely produced in this city, 
and goes to support many families and many 
individual owners of oil wells. 

The Ocean Park Tract at Santa Monica 
is being made more attractive by Messrs. 
Kinney it Dudley who haveaforceof men and 
teams opening up the new streets and increas- 
ing the beauty of this popular suburb. 



St* Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding: and Day College for 
Young- Men and Boys 

. .THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
I mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides Knglish, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Che Tall term Begins on monday, September 4th 

For further information, semi for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A LINN, C. M. 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Evsry individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, 111 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 



Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- Make Bne halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
sage, Hairdressing. shampooing, Human Hair newspaper cuts-just any hlng you want en- 
Goods of all kinds. Titv Ckk.mk i.e Acacia Braved. See them at the 1 lines Building, Los 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. Angeles. 



Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland ami Jos. Schlitz 
1-ager Beers on draught at all prlncii a] saloons 
in the i lly. Family trade solicited. Phone M li,s 



Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

•Kic per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 8. Broadway. 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chatin &. Fahricks 
stocks of Walt ham. Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re 
gardlessof cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

11!>14 N. Main St., Lot Anoei.es 

Carriage Works 

A. I. LIKE 



House Cleaning: 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, 81.50 day 
25c per hour. (l.'>:i S. Broadway. (ieo Tanahi 



Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
liage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc., made to order. HOO-siKi Spring i 
and 801-808 B. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANIN6 WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Hugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. Ml South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Rout. Jordan 

Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give sp> cial attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Third St. 

Telephone Main i i 



Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

Are made at Plazn Photo Callcry at honest prices. 
To save money go where they have light ex 
pensesand can give you your money's worth. 
Plaza Gallery, 513 N. Main. 

Real Estate 

" May ii r HimIk 1 1 ■ ** har^ujiiH " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Itenl I ■ A grills 

lis West Foi'HTH St. - - LoxAm.kiks 

Printing- 

GEO. RICE & SONS, Inc.) 

The largest and beat equipped In Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specialty. 

311*313 New Hioh St. - LM AJMBUII 



Veterinary Surg-con 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital. 627 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1152. White 2131. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING. M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours : » to 12 M 2 to 5 and 7 to * P. M . 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

4o>£ s. si'KiNo St. - • i-os Annum 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1 26 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



Wines 

GOLD MEDAL' WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. FREE DELIVERY 
Soctiiern California Wine Co. 220 West 
4th at., \x>f. Angeles. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate In probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from fio.ooo to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4)2, 50a roll 

Gilts T/zC " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shade* 25c each 

WALTER BROS 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



I 



Oldest and Large*! Hank in Southern 
California 

Farmers I Merchants Bank 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) #00,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total fj ,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN Prealdent 

II. W. HEM. MAN Vice-President 

B. J. FLEISHMAN Cashlei 

<;. HEIMANN ajabtantOaahlei 




DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Cliaaacll 

0. W. Chllda I. W. Hellman, Jr. L N.Van NtUI 
J. F. FranclH H \V. Hellman I. W. Ilellinan 

**"Sjk-c1r1 Collection Department. Onraafcty 
depoalt department offers to the public, aafes for 
rent in Ita t ew tire and burglar proof vault, 
which l» the strongest, heat guardcJ and best 
lighted in thia city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main. Spring ami Temple St*. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED 1200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Intercut paid on deponita 
Money loaned on real estate only 

r. L. DUQUK ...President 

1. N. VAN NUY8 V.oe-Prcfddeiit 

B. V. DUQUK Oaahler 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, Kasper Cohn, H. 
W. O'Melveny. L. Winter, O. T. JoIiiihoii, 
T. L. Dii<|uc, I. N. Van Nuya, W.O. Kerckhoff, A. 
Baaa, 



Park Market 

CHAM. KKHTNKIt, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone lted MQ 



14 



Western Graphic 





Amusements 



" T7SSAYS in Dramatic Criticism, with 
-I — > Impressions of Some Modern Plays" 
is the title of an attractive book by Professor 
L. Dupont Syle, of the department of English 
literature in the University of California. 

Professor Syle dedicates the volume, by 
permission, as a mark of appreciation "to 
Mrs. Phoebe A Hearst, whose thoughtful and 
loving generosity has made possible to so 
many the attainment of ideals." 

In these essays the author sets forth in an 
entertaining style the history of the modern 
drama from the time it first attained a recog- 
nized position as an art in England and 
France. 

He enters into a lively discussion of "la 
the actor's art unworthy?" and cites Joseph 
Jefferson, Edwin Booth and Sir Henry Irving 
to show that the best types of manhood and 
intellectual genius adopt the stage as a pro- 
fession. 

Professor Syle sets a high standard for the 
actor and actress in his chapter on "Some 
essentials in the actor's art." Temperament, 
sensibility and intellect are the qualities which 
he insists an actor must have as a ground 
work. By adding to these perfect elocution, 
repose, manner and voice the author holds 
out the hope that any conscientious actor may 



attain a high place in the theatrical profes- 
sion. 

"The endowed theatre" is a subject to which 
Professor Syle devotes a chapter. He declares 
that public endowments are as necessary to 
the theatre as to a college in order to make 
the drama an educational influence. 

"At last," he says, "the English are be- 
ginning to remove from themselves the re- 
proach I have stated. They are educating 
their people up to an appreciation of the best 
that has been thought and done in the drama. 
They are doing this by the only means pos- 
sible, that is, by regarding the drama seriously 
as a fine art, and not as a form of speculative 
investment which must be made to return fif- 
teen to twenty per cent upon the capital put 
in. This last mentioned way of looking at 
the drama is the one prevalent in the United 
States. The first mentioned way has long 
been prevalent in France and Germany." 



THE Lambardi Opera Company have 
worked the Patti "last appearance" 
movement with success for a week, and last 
week I was led into writing an "epitaph," so 
to speak. It is pleasant to learn that the 
company is not to be disorganized and blown 
to the four winds, but with renewed contracts 
with all the singers Fred Colver is to take to 
the road with the singers, for better or fur 
worse. No greater enthusiasm, for the size of 
the audience, was ever shown in the Los An- 
geles theatre than on Wednesday night at the 
performance of "Rigoletto." Angelenos who 
had heard the opera many times before 



actually rose to their feet and cheered the 
magnificent quartettes of Verdi's most dra- 
matic opera. For many years to come this 
season of music will be remembered as a point 
in our amusement history, and the influence 
on the musical temperament of the city will 
be far reaching. 

THE Orpheum has a "no standing room" 
bill this week. There is mirth in the 
acts from start to finish and as a rapid fire 
joker Geo. Golden's fame has met a Waterloo 
in the success of Geo. Wilson. He never fal- 
ters, there is no lack of confidence in him, 
and with unerring aim he shoots his ticklers 
into the audience with jolly effect. 

Minnie Palmer comes like a memory of 
the past, but as fresh as a girl in her teens. 
As Rose the Red Cross nurse she is idyllic, as 
Rose Pompom, a cocotte, she is bewitching, 
and no one can blame the old marshal for 
falling to hei wiles for the moment. 

"A Wise Guy" continues to be appreciated 
to its full worth. The tough "peaner mover" 
is the most perfect piece of toughness that 
ever escaped the chain gang, and it is hard to 
believe that Mr. Hayes is anything else but a 
sprout from the Bowery. 

It is a puzzle why Willian and Shields do 
not perfect the climax of their act. It has go 
and snap up to the last two minutes, but the 
rattle of the curtain can be heard in the 
scattered applause on the end. 

Orpheum —Laura Joyce Bell, one of the most 
famous comediennes in the land, is to begin a short en- 
gagement at the Onpheum next week. As the wife 
of Digby Bell, she has appeared during the past 
decade in some of the greatest comic opera and dra- 
matic successes of the past ten years. Vaudeville 
secured her services for a brief term by the oiler of a 
small fortune for a season's work. Her hit in vaude- 
ville has been pronounced and emphatic. She iB to 
present at the Orpheum a comedy called "Wig and 
Gown," which many theatre goers will remember as 
one of Rosina Vokes' best short comedies. 

Elizabeth Murray, a wonder in the way of story 
telling, is expected to prove that some women at least 
can tell dialect stories equally as well as the famous 
men monologists in vaudeville. Miss Murray is said 
to do the trick with rare success. 

The Eldridges, colored comedians; Kilpatrick 
and Barber, trick cyclists, Minnie Palmer, in the 
comedy drama, "Rose Pompon;" Les Browns, the 
one-legged acrobats; and Hayes and Lytton in a new 
burlesque of "Ingomar" complete the bill. 



Los Angeles Theatre The last three days of the 
Lambardi engagement have been under the manage- 
ment of Len Behymer, who rills out an even week in 
view of the dark house next week. This afternoon 
Norma will be sung, and tonight the last opportunity 
will be offered to hear incomparable Trovatore. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIB8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeyille 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Aug. 7. 

L»ura Joyca Bell and her Jolly Company. 

Klizabeth Murray, Comedienne. 

The Kldiidg.s, Past Masters of Colored Commedy. 

Minnie Palmer, the Trans Atlas tic Star. 

Hayes and Lytton, in the Farce Comedy "A Wise<iuy." 

Kilpatrick and Barber, Scientific Trick Bicyclists. 

Lea Browns, Acrobats, Jumpers, Dancers, Instrumentalists 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any scat. 



ERE IS JUST ONE 



First-Class 



LOS ANGELES CLOTHING STORE | 

WE *** IT I 



SUITS, $20.00 down 



Your Money Back 
if you want it 



LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY 

I 17 to 125 North Spring St. 



Western Graphic 



THE MAN WITH THE STICK 

Poor Adam when born was without any hoe. 

He scratched up the earth with a stick as you know. 

And went without help being without the dough. 

That poor, old, original man. 
The door of his shack was devoid of a latch. 
The seat of his pants loudly called for a patch. 
He only survived by an eternal scratch. 

That dear, old, original man. 
For nine hundred years he dug on with his stick, 
And when it got dull and the end it got thick, 
He sharpened it on the flat side of a brick, 

That bright, old, original man. 
And then his descendents ten millions or more, 
A thousand years dug with a stick as before, 
Without any windows and scarcely a door, 

Those poor, aboriginal men. 
They worked every minute as long as 'twas light, 
And rested their bones only during the night. 
To get enough food was an unending fight. 

With those aboriginal men. 
A hoe was invented by old Tubal Cain, 
A patent applied for his rights to maintain, 
They dug with a stick competing in vain, 

With that loafer who leaned on his hoe. 
Then «over-production» that great Bugaboo, 
Was laid to the use of that dangerous hoe, 
The great "Labor l'nion» declared «it must go,» 

Those anti-monoply men! 
They stood on the corners in bunches so queer, 
And when you passed by them they struck you for beer, 
In case you refused them they gave you a leer, 

Those anti-monoply men! 
They claimed that a man could produce in one day, 
Just three times as much as he could the old way, 
They felt the intruder had come there to stay. 

That dangerous man with the hoe. 
The feeling grew stronger and stronger each day, 
And though ages and ages have since passed away, 
There's a kick and a cuff if he ever gets gay, 

For the fellow who handles the hoe. 

I. w. Lord. 

Ioamosa, Cal., July 1899. 



Mistook the Mule 

Deacon Jackson was a very pious but very 
determined old colored citizen of Owl Creek 
Valley. He had a young mule which his 
boys were unable to ride, and their failure to 
break the animal so exasperated the old man 
that he determined to ride it himself. He 
was, however, no sooner located on its hack 
than he was thrown into an adjoining lot 
where he was picked up with both legs 
broken and his neck badly sprained. 

"What on earth did such an old man as 
you mean by trying to ride a wild young 
mule like that?" asked the doctor. 

"Waal, suh," said Deacon Jackson, "I 
never does undertake to do nuthin' widout 
fust consultin' ov dc Lawd and seein' whut he 
dun thunk erbout hit. I axed him ef I orter 
ride dat mule what my trillin' no ercount 
boys couldn't ride an de Lawd he sed, 'Y«;s- 
sah,' jes' ez plain ez I am talking to you." 

"Well, but he seems to have given you bad 
aavice." 

"No, doctor, his judgment was all right, 
fer de Lawd knows dis ole nigger never seed 
de day when he was afeered to straddle any- 
thing from a circular saw up to er elephant, 
but dis time I think de Lawd was jes' mis- 
tooken in de mule." — Atlanta Journal. 



No man who has watched the career of 
William McKinley can have failed to note the 
conspicuous place in his temperment and 
conduct which are occupied by 
Our President' s the domestic virtues. A man 
Tenderness owes the most tender devotion 
to his mother and his wife, 
and the President throughout his career has 
exemplified the most touching and exigent 
duties towards both. His mother belonged to 
that noble and robust Scotch Irish stock which 
has filled so large a space in the frontier exten- 
sion of the United States and in the up build- 
ing of the American Union. Firm, robust 
and elastic, she held out nearly to her nine- 
tieth year. Her son's presence at her bed- 
side, his tender, filial devotion, shown at a 
time when most imperative public duties 
claimed his attention, did not pass unnoticed 
by the American people. The McKinley house- 
hold is a remarkable one in more ways than 
one. For years the wife of the President has 
been an invalid, and her husband has been 
her most devoted lover and attendant, sacri- 
ficing many opportunities for pleasure and 
profit to the demands arising from his wife's 
infirmities. He is now at her side amidst 
genial skies and hills on Lake Champlain ad- 
ministering to her every want and necessity 



notwithstanding the extreme demands for 
Presidential presence at the seat of Govern- 
ment. Such traits endear a man to the masses 
irrespective of partisanship. Out of such 
homelike ties and associations have sprung 
the vigor and manhood of the American na- 
tion. 

The New York Herald put its foot into it 
and allied itself with yellow journalism when 
it gave out that Dewey had 
A Silly declared that our next war 

Canard will be with Germany. "Dew- 

ey never said such a thing!" 
cries the American people in one voice. No 
great American sailor or soldier would say so 
silly and disrespectful a thing — much less 
Dewey, the incomparable Dewey. 

PROFESSIONAL DIRECT (TITy 

PHYSICIANS AM> 31 RGKOlfS 



ELIZABETH A. FOLLANSBEE 

315 SO. BROADWAY 
Kooms: 882-884 Laughlin Ituildiug 
JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN. 
Hours: 9 a.m. to 12 m., 1 to G p.m. 
H S. ORME 

416-117 DOCOLAS BLDO 
Third and Spring Streets 



Olllre hours sto'ja.m 
1 to 4 p. in 

Tel. Main 737 



Tela. 



Tel. Main KK. 



jOffiee Main fiCO 
(Res. Main 300 



RKSIDF.NCK 
' 1 • N . lii NKKH llll I. 



Honrs— 10-12 a.m. 
2-4 p.m. 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

328-330 WIIXOX Bl'ILDING 
lei. Main i ll I Rf.muf.si k TIIK l.ofKK 

DENTIS1 s 



D. CAVE 

LANKERSE1M BLOCK 
126 West Third street 



Tel. Main 1515 



[sghrmsbTrgH 

...WINES... 



The Host Famous of California 



%f$0 Light, Delicate Wines, 
Matured in Underground 



IIP Cellars and Kottled with 
great care at the Vineyard 



neyard 'g}<3& 



PACiriC COAST AGENTS 



Sherwood & Sherwood 



l.os Angeles 



San Kramisro 



mount Lowe Railway 

Magnificent Panorama of Karth and Oeean 
Grandest Trip on Karth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3500 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
elass hotel. Beautifully furnished appartnicnls 
wiili or withoul halhs ( ulsiuc unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up- per week 

SPECIAL 

(iuests remaining one week or longer will he al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a ffie round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily If 
desired. 

Tickets and lull information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Triilttr Hinl Kxrur 



214 South Spring St. 



Agent 

Los Angeles Cal. 



Tel. Mnin 960 




LADIES 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

rro|tiiri:<. only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

(' h *' in I m t 

•»•; „*v*Price 50cts 

Noi l h M nl ii -.1 reel 



Tailoring and Repairing 
Suits mwle to order, goods the very best, pricea 
the lowest. ItepairinK promptly done. 

H. L. Yeikieh, 118 West Second Street. 



: 
: 




GENERAL WHEELER AND HIS DAUGHTER. 

"Fighting " Wheeler and his daughter, Annie Laurie Karly Wlieeler, are on 
their way to Manila. The general will take command of the United .States cavalry ir 
;he Philippines and the young woman will enter the hospital at Manila asa nurse.. SV 
was a nurse in C uba during the war with Spain. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"Itlooksjust like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury— white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 



3pend the Summer 



AT 



San Diego a nd 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



June 16 and 17 
July I and 2 



August 4 and 5 
September I and 2 



Rate $3. 00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

Inquire of Santa Ko Route \gent '.'00 South Spring Street (cor. 2ud) Los Aug 



Gardening «i 
4ju California * * 

W. S. LYON 




New 
Edition 
Just Out! 




A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
3 lowers in Southern 
California 

c (S[)rUten for this Soif and Climaie 
J2icefi) Tftustrated 
Sven/ lover of IJ-foTvers should have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) '"'^SSt "•• 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 




F PRINTERS 
UBLISHERS 



AND 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for us to 
handle to yonr entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 

Tel. M. 1053 LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



0<] SCCCKSSOK TO p>o 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



" **** 



701 South Main Street 



Blectrical Repairing 

A. mint lire Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

i,n<i Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=Class Machine Work 



JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr. 



Telephone 
Main 1S70 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo. Eice 4 Sons (Ino„) 311 313 N'w Hich Street 



Western Graphic 



Col-YRKiHTED 



>Itt ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 
FOR SOVTHfRN CALIFORNIA. 



Volume VII. 
Number 7 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 12, 1899. 

WQ333lK>a33aga33]>!>l>!>3a33ai>3i>iyK>3i>|>i>acC<lCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC< I CC<KIC< l«i 













54 



REDONDO 
EDITION 





Edition de Luxe 
to Cents a Copy 









MEMBERS OF THE REDONDO COUNTRY CLUB 

On the Lawn at Hotel RcJondo 











Western Graphic 




McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 



Hen's Bathing Suits 

You know the pleasure and satisfaction of a dip 
in your own bathing suit ; and the cost is very 
little if you men have no objection to coming into a dry 
goods store. And why should you have ? This is 
almost as much a store for men as it is for women. 
Men who have looked the town over say that our one 
and two-piece suits at $2.00 are far ahead of anything 
shown at the price. 



Ho! Mr. Camper! A special lot of special Blankets at special 
prices for campers' use. Good weight, large size, good qiulity, handsome 
shade of grey with brilliant colored borders. Recently fi.75 a pair; this 
morning at $1 .35. 



Imported RugS. We oiler one-half bale of beautiful Dahgastan 
Hind-Loom Rugs. The colors are rich and mellow ; the qualities are su- 
perb. These are cheaper than you could possibly buy them at auction 
There are many rugs in this half bale that would be really cheap at $ 20.00. 
Vour choice of any at #12.00. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 



317-325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311 313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Anceles, Cai.. 
Entered at the postoffice in I.os Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Three Dollars a Vear in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 
Sngile Copies, Edition de Luxe, Ten Cents. 




' •■■js, *^«« »^|S t wT>. .-Tn« 



Joseph Maikk, 



GHHKU Zobei.ein 
Pres Mid Trcas. Yice-Pres. and Sec y ^ 

I 




A QUARTETTE CONSPICUOUS IN STREET RAILWAYS. 
This group contain! the portrait* of four men who are conspicuous in the present 
Jay history of street railways. Tom L. .Johnson hag held large interests in the street 
railways of several American cities ami lias recently attracted attention bee nise of his 
'iinnection with Governor I'ingree's effort to secure miinicipully owned r iiways for 
Detroit. Clinton L. Kiisniter is president of t lie Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, 
rfaOM employees recently went on strike. II. II. Vreeland is president of the Metro- 
<tw a t R.;|™«» (Vxnnanv of New York. 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



ROUND TRIP 

50c 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
I 7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



jt Good Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



J> «.* Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9 35 P-m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier & Zobelein 

Brewery 



1 N 1 OBPORATBD 



444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal . 

TEL. M. 91. 



• ^Nt "^P* 



Announcement 

High-class Ladies' Tailor 

We have opened a well-appointed De 
parttnent of Ltdies' Tailoring. We are 
turning out work in this department up 
to our high staudard. Material and work 
equal to hest New York tailors. 



r) Los /fqge/es 




Tel. 'Red 3711 



J. KORN 

34S South c Broa<hx>a.y 



NOTICE 

The Los Angeles City W ter Company will 
strictly enforce the following rale: The hours 
for sprinkling are between r> and H o'clock a. m. 
and 6 and s o'clock p, m. For h violation of the 
ab>ve regulation the water will tie shut oil', and 
a tine of ti.uo will he charged before the water 
will be turned ou again. 



212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses in Hook-keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street. Los Angeles. Cal. 



L* A* Sulphur Springs 



and Baths i 



■ » »> Oor. Macy and Lyon BtS. and 851 Howard St. ® 

These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of j§ 
Kidney ami Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. & 

A. PTJISSEGUR, Proprietor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 1 



NOT1CK OF FORECLOSUHK SAIjK 

Sheriffs Sale, No. 32140. 

J. If. Klliottand H. T. lee, as Trustees for 
Jessie P. Church, plaintiffs, vs. Minnie s. Serrot, 
Un said Minnie Serrot and J. W. liiilette and W. 
W Widney as Kx tutors of the Will of Charles 
E. Serrot, deceased, Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 18th day of .Inly, 
A.D., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in J. M. Elliott, et al.. the above named 
plaintiffs, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie B. Serrot, 
et al., defendants, on the 27th day of June, 
A.I). 1999, for the sum of Seventeen Hm dred 
and Fourteen and -10-100 Hollars, gold coin of the 
United States, which said decree was, on the 
:10th day of June, A. D 1899, recorded 
In Judgment Book 85 of said Court, 
at page 4, I am commanded to sell all that 
certain lot. piece, or parcel of land situate, 
lying and being In the county of Los Angeles, 
state of California, and bounoed and described 



as follows: Lot Thirteen (18) of Hodgkin's Sub- 
division of Lot Kighty-s ven (87) and Eighty- 
eight |88l of Watt's Subdivision of part of the 
Kancho San Rafael, according to the map of 
said Hodgkin's Subdivision, recorded in Hook 
5, page ">"i) of the Miscellaneous Records of Los 
Angeles County, California. Together with Ten 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamore 
Canyon Water Company of San Rafael, Los 
Angeles Conntv. California. 

Together with all and singular t!:e tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be 
longing, or in anywise appertaining. 

Public notice isherehv given that on Tuesday, 
the 8th day of August, A. I). 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M . of that dav, in front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with Interest 
and costs, etc., to the highest and best bidder, 
for caBn, gold coin of the U. S. 

Dated thiB 18th day of July, 1899. 

W. A. HAMMEL. 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

By STEPHEN AI.I<EN Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Scott, Plaintiff's Attorneys. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 7. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 12, 1899. 



Kdltlon de l.uie 
10 Cents a Cnpy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRIM \ N 
IRWIN H. RICE 



:-: :■: editor 
associate editor 



THE most noted primaries that have ever 
taken place in California were those 
that came off in San Francisco on Tuesday 
last and which resulted in the complete over- 
throw of all the bosses of all parties and a 
promise of purer government for that city 
than has ever been known. Good men of 
both parties triumphed and all others were 
indiscriminately slaughtered, including both 
Buckley and Rainey, while the Examiner was 
ignominiously beaten. The Southern Pacific 
Company, under the leadership of George 
Crocker, took the side of the better govern- 
ment legion and helped to scatter the political 
bosses and barnacles of both parties. It will 
be remembered that this young railroad mag- 
nate possessed the courage last fall to for the 
first time in the history of that giant corpora- 
tion declare that the "railroad was in poli- 
tics," and that it had at least as much right 
to take a hand regarding its interests as the 
owners of saloons, barber shops, banks, dry 
goods stores, and all other tax-paying con- 
cerns. In one moment young Crocker, who 
is already head and shoulders above his noble 
old father and brilliant brother in many of 
his methods of administration, went to the 
front as a man of excellent executive mind 
and foresight; and, notwithstanding the sur- 
prise he created generally, and the solicitude 
of those whr were acquainted only with the 
old-time tactics of the Southern Pacific, his 
truthfulness and courage became no unsub- 
stantial factor in the attainment of an over- 
whelming Republican success. We do not 
mean by this tfcut the railroad is always right 
or always generous. But we do mean that 
it has as much right to be in politics as the 
owners of other properties, from a lumber 
yard to a mule. And we are glad to know 
that its chief executive officer on this coast 
has the good American grit to say so. 

What a time the boys would have if the 
city treasury was filled up full to overflowing 
with over $2,500,000, the proceeds from the 
proposed sale of city bonds. 
Against Water- The "boys," a few smart poli- 
works Bonds. ticians, some office holders 
and the favored banks of 
deposit would be strictly in it. There would 
be all kinds of commissions and jobs, the de- 
posits would be worth $50,000 a year to the 
banks, the interest would have to be paid 
yearly, and as the chances are that it would 
take from five to ten years to determine in the 
courts whether the water company can be 
forced to sell or give up their property, the 
taxpayer would all this time be paying 
double the taxes he is now, which he considers 
high enough. So there you are. 



Some of the reasons given by our best 
posted citizens for stopping this reckless ex- 
penditure of money and the additional burden 
of taxation are as follows: 

1st. The proposed water bonds would be 
worthless because unconstitutional. Author- 
ity — best legal talent in thd city. (See 223rd 
sections of the city charter and decisions of 
the supreme court, 118 Cal. 48G, 17 Cal. Dec. 
70, and adopted by Judge Shaw in his recent 
decision, Law Journal Vol XII, No. 132, Pub- 
lic Economy.} 

2nd. It is time enough to vote bonds to 
pay for the water system after we know the 
price, terms and conditions. 

3d. Bonds at the present time are prema- 
ture, costly to the city and could only become 
a special deposit, benefitting a few individuals 
at the expense of the taxpayers. 

4th. With the extraordinary expenses re 
quired (sic) to govern this city, the highest 
possible assessments and tax rates have to be 
adopted, and with it all a large deficit is cer- 
tain for the coming fiscal year. 

5th. The present owners of the water sys- 
tem are all citizens of this city and all the 
profits arising go toward improvements in 
this city, giving all labor to working men that 
municipal ownership could give, and instead 
of sending the possible profits to the foreign 
bond holders as interest, keep the money, in- 
terest, profits and all at home where it will do 
the most good. 

6th. The Wkstekn Graphic is satisfied 
that the city council and the water company 
can arrive at an equitable, fair and just settle- 
ment of their differences by talking the matter 
over in a business way; that the city can be- 
come owners of the water system on a plan 
that will not require the present expensive 
campaign, and that all the money can be had 
at home to conduct the negotiations; or, in 
other words, that the water company stock- 
holders would themselves carry the debt and 
in some way accept their pay out of the re- 
ceipts. It is worth trying, at least. 

As to waterworks bonds, we say no. 



There is a great deal more than a cursory 
expression of opinion in the resolutions on 
government storage reservoirs that were 
adopted by the Board of Trade at its regular 
meeting this week. No more important mat- 
ter confronts our representatives to the next 
congress than the conservation of water for 
irrigation purposes, and men who have 
studied the problem from every point of view 
are united in that the only practical solution 
is in governmental action. The lessons of the 
last two parched years should be productive 
of no uncertain expressions from the most 
suffering sections. While we must express 
faith in the ability and energy of our con- 
gressmen, they are busy men, and a rousing, 
forcible memorial to Congress would not hin- 
der their efforts. 

Time was when the writer thought that 
any person who dared to utter a word against 
any method of an American public school was 
an enemy of learning and of society. And 
he has lived to register his vote in favor of all 



educational bonds and improvements up to 
the present time, although he has viewed 
with no false alarm the tremendous moneys 
spent during the past twelve years for the 
purposes that should have no standing in the 
public schools. And he has at last concluded 
that a halt should lie called in the introduc- 
tion of "further studies," and that, instead, 
an elimination of much that now "belongs" 
to the "curriculum" should be insisted upon. 
In the days of Webster and Benton and Sum- 
ner and Wilson there were no foreign and 
ancient languages in the so-called grammar 
schools of the United States and only Latin in 
some of the high schools. Now, from the 
kindergarden to the high school, there are 
methods too numerous to mention that not 
only spoil the youth of the land for trade and 
business vocations but keep up an army of 
highly paid teachers that draws the life blood 
out of millions of poor taxpayers throughout 
the country. Ever}' child in the United 
States is guaranteed a common (or even 
higher) school education, of which dabbling 
in a foreign or dead language, or music or 
shorthand, should be no part. It is a fact 
that children who graduate from the grammar 
schools into the higher schools of this city are 
notoriously deficient in spelling, writing and 
arithmetic, the three things that are essential 
to success in trade or business today, as they 
have been since common schools were insti- 
tuted. And it is only fair to assume that the 
many pupils who go out into the business and 
laboring world without being examined for 
the high schools, after working through the 
grammar grades, are similarly deficient in 
these three most necessary branches of study. 
It is a pity that this must be acknowledged, 
but the fact is here to be faced. It is a stub- 
born fact also that in the most excellent and 
flourishing seminary for young ladies in Los 
Angeles a third of the pupils cannot answer 
a social letter of acceptance without two or 
more errors of orthography, punctuation or 
prosody. The time, therefore, is not far dis- 
tant when the Los Angeles Board of Educa- 
tion will see to it that an elimination of pub- 
lic school frills and a saving of taxes shall be 
guaranteed. Then there will be an improve- 
ment all along the line. At present a major- 
ity of our highly educated young ladies grad- 
uate with a superficial knowledge of the 
classics and of Latin and even Greek, of music 
and belles letlres, who cannot write or speak 
English correctly, and boys are turned out by 
the thousands who stand 100 in Latin and 
algebra, but who are unable or unwilling to 
earn a living because they cannot spell com- 
mon English words or write a legible hand. 

My! won't the people who most especially 
hate trusts lay back and chuckle when trusts 
begin fighting trusts! And there is no mil- 
lenium optimism about the prospect, either. 
The end is as inevitable as was the growth of 
the enormous industrial sponges — a sponge 
will hold just bo much water. Already there 
is a beginning in Kentucky, where there is a 
probability of the outside whisky interests be- 
ing "trusted," in the event of which a battle 
royal may be expected sooner or later. 



Western Graphic 




Observations of the Owl 



THERE is apparent in this city a woeful 
lack of sympathy for those ten-per- 
cent-a-month money lenders that find them- 
selves loaded up with the paper obligations of 
a feminine financier who for years has fatted 
their cash boxes. That a 
Money Lenders woman without any financial 
Were Caught standing of her own could in 
two years set alloat in this 
city over fifty thousand dollars of promissory 
notes bearing the name of her father who 
dwells in a distant state seems almost in- 
credible to many persons that have found it 
difficult if not impossible to obtain needed 
loans on much better security. The willing- 
ness of the woman to pay any interest that 
was asked and any price for commissions and 
extensions, and her displayed ability to raise 
from one broker the wherewithal to liquidate 
the claims of another made easy the way for 
the person to whom borrowing seems to have 
been a monomania. The brokers showed 
great eagerness to loan insignificant sums 
upon the borrower's note secured by the sup- 
posed personal obligation of her father for 
many times the amount of her indebtedness. 
A few payments of the exorbitant interest 
made safe the principal. When disclosure 
came at last the notes which the reputed 
signer now denounces as worthless, are found 
in the strong box of nearly every professional 
money lender and in the possession of certain 
novices in such precarious investment. The 
money lenders that exact ten per cent a 
month for their advances do not expect sym- 
pathy. They will content themselves with 
the chances the future may afford for recoup- 
ing their loss. 

If all the charges and countercharges that 
have been made in a long pending locally 
famous divorce suit were to become principles 

of law, and form counts con- 
Divorees stituting causes for the sun- 

Made Easy dering of the marital tie, how 

many married couples in this 
city would wholly lack causes for bringing 
similar suits? In this particular case, made 
conspicuous by the high social standing of the 
contending parties, the most trivial occur- 
rences of a not well matched couple have been 
given a degree of importance that to disinter- 
ested spectators has seemed positively ludi- 
crous. And yet when married people make 
up their minds they want a divorce there is 
difficulty in convincing them otherwise. 

"If I had the money to fight this claim I 
would beat you," once declared a debtor of J. 
S. Slauson. "How much will it cost you to 
fight me?" asked Mr. Slauson. "Two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars," was the reply. "I will 
let you have the money," said Mr. Slauson; 
"and if you beat me I will give you back 
your note. No man must say of me that his 
poverty kept him from getting justice from 
me." This was an actual incident in the career 
of the rich man who is now at outs with his 
son-in-law. The man referred to concluded 



not to make the fight and he paid back the 
money. 

Between Sam Dewey's financial entangle- 
ments with Mrs. Mackenzie and his Uncle 
George's animadversions on the subject of a 

war with Germany the Dew- 
The Deweys eys just now seem to be ab- 
Are In It sorbing more than their share 

of public attention. 

The local scramble for the postmastership 
becomes more complicated every day as new 
elements are injected into the issue. Nobody 

believes that Congressman 
Who Will be Waters will relinquish any 
Postmaster part of his prerogative in the 

selecting of a Republican to 
succeed Postmaster Matthews, but terrific and 
con dieting pressures being brought upon 
him to favor this one and that one, put forth 
by various interests. Congressman Waters' 
expressed declaration that the new postmas- 
ter will be a business man does not clear up 
the haze of mysterious guessing as he diplo- 
matically chooses to throw some obscurity 
upon the exact kind of a business man that 
he will favor. The suspicion that in the mat- 
ter of selecting a postmaster the city has been 
placed under mart : al law may have emanated 
from thoee perf-oi.s who, judging by the past, 
retain their due respect for the power that 
from this distant point sways the McKinley 
mind. W. R. Ream 

Local writtrs have valued the friendship 
of their respective fighting editors too highly 
to indulge in stories on the N.E.A. delegates, 
hut now that the educators have nearly all 
vanished through the depot gates, a reason- 
ably secure position is assured. This story is of 
a tall, clerical looking professor who wandered 
into Levy's one noon with the air of a man 
who was about to buy a half interest in the 
refectory for an hour. His dress was rich — 
Prince Albert coat, negligee shirt, no vest, 
slouch hat. The menu seemed to stagger him, 
and for fifteen minutes he read over the items 
and prices, finally ordering some fried fish 
and a glass of water. Quickly came a plate 
of shrimps and a finger bowl. With a cloud 
in his face that had undoubtedly scared many 
an offending youngster half to death, he in- 
dignantly beckoned the waiter — "Look here, 
sir, I did not order these insects; I want fried 
fish." The circus was on, and several diners 
nearest him could not suppress genteel evi- 
dences of their mirth. But the waiter gently 
assured the pedagogue that it was customary 
to serve shrimps and that they were free. 
The "free" mollified him and with a furtive 
glance at his vis-a-vis he gingerly speared the 
head of one of the "insects" with his fork 
and shell, whiskers and all were masticated 
with as much external relish as he could 
assume. The whiskers evidently bothered 
him as it took half a glass of water to wash 
the delicacy down. The thought struck him 
to try condiments on the new dish, and with 



a liberal layer of horseradish he squared him- 
self to do or die. The exhibition had passed 
the point of modest levity and the dining 
room was a bubbling, sputtering crowd of 
men; but oblivious of his part in the 
entertainment the poor fellow bravely scooped 
up the shrimps with knife and fork alter- 
nately and did not waver until the last of 
them was safely stowed away behind his belt- 
less pants band. 

They Do Say 

Al Levy — The typical waiter never refuses 
a tip. 

John Bryson — Old age is occasionally as 
foolish as it is usually wise. 

Hancock Banning — One way to prevent 
seasickness is to remain on land. 

J. F. Sartori — Loafers and postage stamps 
are usually stuck on corners. 

Health Officer Powers — A small boy says 
the worst nation on earth is vaccination. 

Mrs. Rothery, Capital — Call a woman an 
angel and she will plead gii'lty every time. 

Maj. J. A. Donnell — As soon as a political 
campaign opens the speakers come to blows. 

W. T. S. Hammond — If there is nothing 
else in a name there is at least one or more 
letters. 

Walter Haas — Possibilities are all right 
in their way, but they never prove any- 
thing. 

Simon Maier — It seems queer that there is 
a demand for dressed beef in warm weather. 

J. A. Muir — Money makes the mare go, 
but railway officials prefer to run trains on 
time. 

Paul Burks — A girl should have a chap- 
eron until she can call some other chap her 
own. 

L. E. Mosher — Some people if properly 
classified would come under the head of ex- 
plosives. 

Louis Vetter — A true friend speaks of your 
vices to your face and of your virtues behind 
your back. 

J. J. Shay — An adherent of the faith cure 
says the red lights in a drug store are danger 
signals. 

Poker Davis — The man who can honestly 
say he doesn't believe in luck has all the 
money he needs. 

O. A. Stevens — Many a stupid man has 
gained a reputation as a wit by being inter- 
viewed by a bright reporter. 

Byron L. Oliver — If hammers, axes and 
lawn-mowers were used in the practice of law 
there would be fewer lawyers. 

Dr. Thompson — Lots of people will never 
make any preparation for the better land un- 
til they see an excursion advertised. 

R. A. Bird, forger — When a man really 
does stumble into a good money-making 
scheme he seldon has money enough to work 
it. 

Fred W. Wood — Electricity has displaced 
the mule on street car lines, canal towpaths 
and in mines. At this rate the mule will soon 
be as useless as the dude. 

Dr. Walter Lindley — To prevent typhoid 
fever boil the drinking water; to prvent dys- 
pepsia drink the boiling water. It seems to 
be merely a matter of choice as well as of 
taste. 

Next week Western Graphic will print 
the first section of a most interesting history 
of "The World's Fairs of all Times." The ap- 
proaching Paris Exposition makes this article 
both timely and instructive. 



Western Graphic 



5 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MME. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTON E-BISHOP 

UONOBKT and OBATORIO so. OIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 
Pupil: Madame Anna de Im Grange, Paris: Signor lUndaggcr. 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio— Bi.anchaud Mt'sic and Art Bui. dim; 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modiiii-Wood 
007 r'igueroa street. 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 



vniCK 

COM POSITION 
Til KOICY 



290 II Kl I.MAN BUM K 



T H 0 M AS W. W I L D E 

PIANO, ORGAN and BAKMOM 
ORGANISI and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Bsbidshcb asd Studio 621 West 17th 



MRS. F. RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRCCl ION 
and SOLO PI4NISTB 

References: 

Blanchard Piano Co., L. A. 614 BoUTH Main Strkkt, 
Ed«ard Scbirner, Berlin 

Moritz Moszkouski, Paris Los Angeles, Cal. 

J.BOND FRANCISCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
and TEACHER 

Pupil of 

Em antei. Wirth, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 




Studio— 



Iil.WCIIARI) HCILOING 



MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHEK OF PIANO-FORTE MUSIC 
Pupil of J H. Hahn, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory of 
Music: and of H. C. Post, Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
IIome STUDIO, 433 W. Ninth St. 

Lcs Angeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANIST 

MRS. W. B. CLAPP 

TEACHEK OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 




FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

studio. 300 Blanchard Bi ii.dino 

MUS. JAMES FRANKI.YN COOK, SotX> Pianist 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons 

Reception en( h Monday evening 



MISS MYRTLE CANADA 

CONCERT and SOI.O VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and concetrs accepted. 

At Studio SUITE 3Ifi BLANCHARD BUILDING Wednesday-, 
Remi>kn< E— Thursday, Saturday, forenoons. 

Caiilornia Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M 1181 



FRED. 



BACON 



TKACIIKIt OK VOICE CULTUKE 
Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday, Thursday. Saturday 
SUITE 318 & 319 BLANCH A RD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE < l LTURE 
Pure Italian Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

315 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VOICE CULTURE 
Formerly Soprano w ith the HlTWOOD COHCKRT Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, 315 BLANCH A RD Building 



ROLLA K. GARDNER 

BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 
String Orchestra Studio. 230% South Si-kino St 



MISS M 



PEARSON 



VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal enltnre, piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. V.ril H. (iKAND AVE 



M 



A R E V A L O 



GUITAR LESSONS 
Si-kiiai.tik.n- Technique, Rich T"iie. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice culture 
Studio, 126 Wilson B'ock, cor. Spring and First Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN \M> GUITA B 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Vacation at Chicago. Return about August 15th 

ED WARD S I E R R A 

OF MEXICO CONSERVATORY 
Private Lessons in 

Piano, Mandolin andVioi.in 204 WILSON BLOCK 




Mm 




JMustc and H r t 




To the PROFUSION. — A special feature of the We urn 
Graphic is its Department of Musi-anil Art. which is in charge 
of an experienced and careful editor Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and w ill be published free. All communications 
should be sent In by Thursday morning 10 insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Editor of Western 
GRAPHIC, Los Angeles! 



MUSICAL fakirs. Such is the only classi- 
fication for a certain group of alleged 
musicians that are finding their way into 
every city and town in the country, and it is 
no idle alarm that without restraint they will 
work irreparable ruin on the music of the 
United States. The musical fakir can hest be 
compared to the quack doctor. The one per- 
haps wrecks the body with nostrums and 
ignorant diagnosis, and the other, equally 
ignorant and unprincipled, forever destroys 
the melody of the soul through false methods 
and lack of inspiration, or else turns loose on 
the community an egotistic automaton with 
no more natural ability than a savage. They 
are a class of people who will rent a furnished 
room, rent a piano, indulge in flashy advertis- 
ing (which they never pay for, and being 
irresponsible can not he made to pay) and 
with false statements of their attainments 
lure pupils to their "studios," where with 
mannerisms and affectations calculated to im- 
press the unsuspecting beginners, force them 
to a degree of proficiency in effect that is 
flattering and clinches their holt on the vic- 
tims. 

What would prove an effective remedy is a 
conundrum. It has been suggested that 
teachers of musuc be required to have diplomas 
from a state board of examiners, the same as 
physicians and school teacher--, but it does 
not seem practical to reduce the art to a 
science or place the musician in the category 
of trained pedagogues. 

It appears to devolve upon the real musi- 
cians, the educated, talented artists, to tight 
the battle against the fakirs, and it will have 
to be made on an educational line. It would 
pay the musicians of Los Angeles to conduct 
a series of popular musicales and lectures 
with a nominal admission, exclusive to stu- 
dents, sufficient to insure expenses and a sin- 
cere class of patrons, giving their time for the 
benefit of the profession. In this way the 
true musical feeling could be aroused in many 
who are now plodding in the dark under the 
tutelage of mediocre, mercenary and un- 
scrupulous persons calling themselves musi- 
cians. 



THE ROAD TO SUCCESS IN SINGING 

AN earnest young woman went to Mine. 
Nordira one day and said: "Madame, I 
am told that your great success came only 
after great struggles. Wiil you tell me how I 
may succeed? I have a voice, they say, and 
good bea'th, but very little money." 

Nordic* is one of the sweetest and most 
womanly women on the stage and is always 
glad to give helpful council when she is 
asked for it, so she replied promptly: "Old- 
fashioned people used to talk about the 'three 
Ms' n- cessary to ordinary life — Readin', 'Kit- 
in' and Mlithmetic. I recommend three Ws 
— Work' Wait and Willi Or perhaps I should 



reverse the order and make it Will, Work and 
Wait. 

"First of all, resolve to succeed. Kxert 
your will as definitely in that direction as if 
you were deciding to go on a visit. You'll 
never get anywhere, you know, unless you 
'make up your mind' to go. Well, make up 
your mind to succeed, and never swerve from 
that determination for an instant. Do not 
consider that failure is possible. 

"The next thing is work — faithful, persis- 
tent work. If you must toil through the day 
to get money enough for your lessons, give 
your evenings unhesitatingly to study. Do 
not complain that there is no time for pleas- 
ure. Do without pleasure! You can get 
along very well without it until you have 
earned it. No earnest worker ever dies with- 
out having tasted some of the sweets of life. 
You need not fear that you shall. 

"Economize. He shabby, if necessary. 
Perhaps your pride may suffer, but keep your 
eyes fixed on the brilliant place you will oc- 
cupy some day and just endure the privations 
with grim fortitude. When success comes 
you will look back on the shabby days and 
laugh! 

"Last, but not least. Wait! Do not be- 
come discouraged as the months grow into 
years and success, as you desire it, still de- 
lays. Why I sang and studied in Boston for 
three years without much visible progress. 
Then a larger opportunity came and I went 
on a concert tour with a famous orchestra as 
soloist Then to Europe with them. At last 
I began to see a glimmer of the light of suc- 
cess. I stayed in Europe and began to study 
there. My old Boston master had taught me 
well and I had nothing to unlearn, but it is 
always easier to work systematically when 
one has a teacher and one cannot learn too 
much. So I sang and still studied until, as 
far as correct work went, I had won success. 

"But there were loftier heights and I had 
my heart set on those. I tried opera. I did 
not at once win a world's applause! I've no- 
ticed that people seldom do out of the story 
books. But I worked at dramatic art as I 
had at music, and applied every power of 
mind and soul to analyzing the various parts 
I had to play, until I felt that each character 
was a part of me. The success that has come 

MISC ELLANEOUS 

A. M. E I) E L M A N 

A RCHITKCT 

Removed to BLANCHAttD HOMO HALL HOLDING 
Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone, Bed 1341 

g. x. rr 7) b i n s o n 

l>l< \ M XTIC TR \ i N I SO 

\ OK I mid PHYSIC \l. < i i i i i:i 

Studio !''2t< S Si-kini; A pply by letter or between hours of 101JM 

»«yyvv«***«v*v«**«« «**««*«««*****« 

* * 

* What is the difference between A QRkAT * 
J ARTIST'S voice ami that of another singer ' J 



QUALITY * 

* What la the difference between the tone of the * 

\ HflRDMflN PIANO \ 

*» ami that of another make of instruments ? < 

% QUALITY 50.000IIN USE * 

J, SOLE AG NTS « 

* LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY * 

i Phone Green 1444 313 S. Broadway. < 

* * 



6 



Western Graphic 




Redondo 



H Queen Hmong the Delightful (iClateHng Places of this 
JVIatchlcss Southern Coast 




R: 



yEDONDO! There 
is a charm in the 
•name as it falls 
upon the ear of the 
stranger in its sugges- 
tiveness of the days of 
old, the romantic days 
when all this beautiful 
souihland was a land of manana, unmarked 
by the hand of the pushing, improving Amer- 
icano. And in like proportion it is more 
charming to those who have spent a day or a 
month of luxurious idleness in the town, in- 
dulging in the recreations of water and land 
or dreaming away the hours while the health- 
ful air is working on the tired body. 



the cattle and sheep seemed to prefer to graze 
on the undulating hills dipping down into 
the ocean, for nature had been lavish in the 
richness of soil and the grass was deep and 
tasted pleasantly of salt from the sea at the 
western edge. 

There was no merry-go-round on the beach, 
no brass band on the bluff, only a stretch of 
clean, white sand edging the pasture land, 
with the mighty Pacific lazily lapping the 
shore. 

Occasionally a tired vaquero would throw 
himself from his broncho and without the 
intervention of a bath house would wrestle 
with the breakers awhile, then dry himself in 
the warm sunshine. Another day he would 
come with a sack and some indifferent fishing 




l'hotos by I'ieroe 



1. H. B. Ainsworth 
3. C. C. Citrpenter 



PRETTY NOB HILL COTTAGES 



mil Simmons >t Cromwell 



2. W. F. Botsford 
4. I. H. Seymour 



to me was honestly earned by years of hard 
work — and is kept by hard work. 

"There is much self-denial in such a life. 
You cannot indulge in social pleasures with 
the same freedom as the rest of the world. 
Late hours are so largely necessary in an 
artist's career that when they are not neces- 
sary it is unwise to indulge in them and con- 
viviality exacts a heavy penalty. If you 
would preserve voice and youth and health to 
enjoy success when you have gained it you 
must accu3tom yourself to abstemious living 
in many respects. 

"Have I made the road to success any 
plainer, my dear?" asked the great artist. 
And (he young girl kissed the extended hand 
as she answered gratefully: "Indeed, Madame 
Nordics, I can never thank you enough. You 
have given me courage to go on, for you have 
made me feel that success is possible. 

Wheeler's Store No. 3. 

In May, 1898, Mr. Will H. Wheeler 
started a small grocery on the hill with about 
two hundred dollars worth of goods. Today 
he occupies one of the large store rooms in 
the English block in the business center of Re- 
dondo. and by making lowest prices enjoys a 
fair 6hare of the business of the city and 
vicinity. The business was managed by his 
fourteen-year-old son, Edward Wheeler, until 
it attained dimensions requiring more exec- 
utive ability, and at present it is managed by 
his oldest son, Harry F. Wheeler, one of the 
best grocery men of Los Angeles. 

The Popular Drink at Redondo 

Of all the pleasing, delectable drinks which 
are most in demand during the heated period 
none is more popular with a vast majority oi 
our beach visiting population than nice cool 
beer. Ju t think how pleasant it is to have h 
nice cool drink of it just before or after a dip 
in the surf, how it fairly glides down oneV 
throat, smoother than the smoothe-t oil. Th<- 
Maier & Zolelein, the ever popular and best 
known beer in Southern California, is that 
most sold in Redondo and right generally i> 
it handled. At any place in Redondo where 
beer can be procured, save two, the Maier A- 
Zobelein is the favorite with all and the only 
draft beer handled. 

Redondo's Editor 

Mr. 8. Deal Barkley, the genial city clerk 
of Redondo whose pleasant countenance ap- 
pears among the group of city officials of this 
Dumber, is numbered among the newspaper 
fraternity, being the editor of the Redondo 
Breeze. As both he and the other officials 
are pleasant, enterprising, wideawake citizens 
the Western Graphic would be glad to give 
each an extended notice, but space forbids. 
We can only say we wish them all a long and 
prosperous life and hope some day to see Mr. 
Barkley the editor of a large metropolitan 
daily. 

In an automobile race near Paris, France, 
the other day between the Columbia Carriage 
Co., I .S.A., and those of the Criterium dfF 
Electrignes, Paris, the American carriage with 
Mr. G. Philippart in charge easily won, run- 
ning fifty kilometers in one hour and twenty 
minutes, the Frenchman coming in thirty 
minutes behind. Columbia is a good name to 
win with. 

The stock of the Lost Gulch copper mine, 
which joins the Black Warrior, at Globe, 
Ariz., advanced from 3c to 25c last Saturday 
upon the election of S. P. Creasinger of Los 
Angeles, as president of the company. Mr. 
Creasinger's identification with the Lost Gulch 
mine will lend much support to the com- 
pany's strength. 



It was not so many years ago that the old 
Dominguez family owned a princely rancho. 
They could ride for miles over their lands, un- 
touched by a plow, unmarked by roads, save 
the paths of the cattle, and of these there 
were thousands, and they were but few with 
the sheep and horses. One of the prettiest 
portions of this vast estate was the rolling 
country over the hills from San Pedro, and 



tackle, and that night the happy family in 
the vaquero's hacienda would enjoy a meal of 
the fish he had lured to his hook. Sometimes, 
perhaps, it would be a love lorn youth who 
would lie on the grass on the hillside, his 
broad sombrero shading his face, smoking his 
corn husk cigarettes and seeking quiet of mind 
gazing off across the deep blue of the big 
water. Surely he could see the senorita's face 
in every dancing, rippling wave. 



Western Graphic 



7 





THK ENTRANCING STOKE OF THE KKDONIK) H.ORAl, COMPANY, I .OS ANiiKI.ES 



KEDONDO DEPOT, KEDONIK) RAILWAY COMPANY 



Hut the day of dreams came to an end. 
The Yankee with his plowB and harvesters 
came in coaches drawn by iron horses; up at 
the city of the Angels he had whipped the 
Mexicans and was running things his own 
way. The men from the east came with gold, 
piles of gold with a spread eagle on each round 
piece, and its i ltluenre was then as it is today. 



see the future. Again the clink of metal won, 
and one thousand acres, with one and one- 
half miles of water front, passed from the 
reign of Dominguez, and it was written in the 
records of the county that they belonged to 
J. C. Ainsworth and R. R Thompson. 

It was in 1887 that these gentlemen came 
from our sister slate of Oregon to undertake 




1 



W ' 




i 4T I* 




Photo l)V Simmons A: Cromwell 

CITY OFFICIALS OF REDONDO 

1, A. H Wbitaoo, T niRteo ; 2, K. P Maxey. Marshal; ::, lico. Catc, Treasurer ; I. W. J. lies*, Pres. Hoard 
Trustees ; S, M. Thomas, Trustee : fi, W. N. Perry. Trustee; 7, S. Deal linrkley, City Clerk. 



Soon the owners of the big ranchos began 
to sell a thousand acres at a time — bits from 
their domain — and one day, long after the 
first coming of American enterprise, two 
shrewd men saw this place with the half round 
bay, the unusually deep water and the terraces 
of hills, and it pleased them — for they could 



the building of a town, and that they have 
worked well in these dozen years is evidenced 
in the extent of their interests. Before com- 
ing here Mr. Ainsworth was the organizer and 
promoter and for thirty years the president 
of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, 
previous to the sale of the property to Henry 



Williird in lsso. He removed to Oakland, 
Cal , where he lived until he came South. 

Mr. Thompson was an associate and di- 
rector in the same company in Oregon, now 
known as the O. R. R. N. Co. He retired 
at about the same time as Mr. Ainsworth and 
afterward lived in Alameda, where he estab- 
lished the Alameda water works, in which he 
is still largely interested. At present he lives 
on Van Nees avenue, San Francisco, in a pala- 
tial residence. 

Immediately upon the formation of the 
Redondo Beach Company the work of laying 
out a town site was begun, the main thorough- 
fare being run at a picturesque angle to th? 
shore line. Then followed the Redondo Hotel 
Company and the Redondo Railway Com- 
pany, the control of all three corporations be- 
ing with Messrs. Ainsworth and Thompson. 

The peculiar formation of the water front, 
a deep submarine canyon heading at Redondo, 
offered that most essential feature for a ship- 
ping point, deep water. But a few rods from 
shore the water is forty feet deep, and the 
erection of two substantial wharves at once 
placed Redondo in the list of Southern Cali- 
fornia ports. The Southern California Rail- 
way was soon extended to this port and was 
followed shortly by the Redondo Railway, the 
big hotel was finished and furnished, stores 
and residences began to spring up, and the 
place assumed municipal airs almost before 
even the promoters could realize it. 

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company 
touches regularly at the company's wharf 
which gives an added importance to the town. 

But it is in its ideal climate, incomparable 
surf bathing and superb fishing and boating 
that Redondo is now forging ahead. It takes 
but fifty minutes to run down from Los Ange- 
les, and on Sundays, especially, long train- 
loads of beachers are dumped on the roomy 
sands, where they throw the cares of the week 
to the winds and return in the evening with 
red noses, full stomachs and with feelings of 
having enjoyed themselves to the limit of their 
expectations. 

The fault with many seaside resorts is that 
there is little of natural beauty and slight 
opportunity for artificial encouragement of 
vegetation owing to the character of the soil 
and the harshness of the salt winds. Hut 
here at Redondo there has been brought to a 
high state of cultivation one of the most re- 
markable gardens in the world — twelve acres 
of irridescent, fragrant carnations. Here per- 
fection is attained, and the familiar expres- 
sion, "nearly as nice, as Redondo carnations," 




ON THK REDONDO GOLF LINKS 
The Fashionable Game has here received a great impetus through the hospitality of the Redondo Country Club 



lie 





IN THK BIG CARNATION CARDRNS 



1(1 



Western Graphic 





.-'MM MM m 

mi 






TIIK PROPOSED CAFE AND PAVILION' UK Ml'SIC 



(IKNKRAL M KRCH AN DISK KSTA Itl.ISHMKNT OK C. I'. AND J. T. .sKABKUT 



is a pleasant evidence of the fact. Large 
quantities of the beautiful Mowers are shipped 
to Loa Angeles where they are handled by the 
Redondo Floral Company. It is a matter of 
comment among tourists to note the fine bloom 
of roses on the hotel grounds, even close to 
the bluff overlooking the sea. The delicate 
blossoms are a mute proof of the salubrity of 
climate and softness of the wind. 

While a drowning is an almost unknown 
incident of this beach, there are always those 
who prefer, or at least also enjoy, the quiet 
comfort of warm still water bathing, and for 
them is provided an immense tank of salt 
water, heated by steam, surrounded with com- 
fortable dressing rooms opening directly at the 
rim of the bisin. It is covered with glass and 
lighted by electricity at night, and many are 
the "plunge parties" that set the walls to ring- 
ing with their frolics. 

Everywhere about town the comfort of the 
visitor is anticipated with benches and covered 
tables and seats, and for the fastidious who 
dread the sand in their shoes and tho^ who 
enjoy the music at the bandstand, there are 
many inviting spots for a restful hour. 

In all it is truly an interesting, refreshing 
and comfortable little city by the sea. The 
overworked man and woman can build up 
many abused tissues in a few days' sojourn, 
be it in a cottage, at the hotel or tenting on 
the beach. The working man can take his 
family down for a day of beneficial fun such 
as nothing can excell, and the tourist and 
pleasure seeker can here find enough to satisfy 
their every wish in va r iety and superiority. 

A strong factor in the building up of Re- 
dondo has been the existence of the Los An- 
geles and Redondo Railway Company, whose 
direct line, fine road bed and comfortable 
equipment makes it the favorite route to the 
coasi town. The depot at Redondo is a hand- 
some structure and being only the width of 
the street from the hotel makes the road espec- 
ially desirable to guests. The Los Angeles 
depots are at Grand avenue and Jefferson 
streets. The officers of the company are: L. 
T. Garnsey, president, Los Angeles; P. T. 
Morgan, vice-president, San Francisco (al«o 
president California Wine Association); H. B. 
Ainsworth. secretary and treasurer, Redondo; 
L. J. Perry, superintendent railway and 
wharves, Redondo 

The Southern California Railway Company, 
known from one end of the country to the 
other as a branch of the g eat Santa Fe Sys- 
tem, has its depot at the approach to the large 
wharf, and runs convenient trains from Los 
Angeles that connect with i's other branches 
from the interior and the transcontinental 
line. Of its equipment nothing need be said, 
as there are few people but have enjoyed 
transportation over the company's rolling 
stock. Much valuable advertising has been 
done for the town by the corporation, Redondo 
and San San Diego being the principal feat- 
ures of the road's summer literature. 

The magnificent panorama of Redondo in 
this issue is from a photo made by C. C. 
Pierce, Los Angeles. 



HOTEL REDONDO 

NO seaside resort on the southern coast 
surpasses Redondo in its location, nat- 
ural advantages, nor climatic conditions, and 
none receive each year greater tribute to its 
attractions in the form of patronage than 
this widely popular outing place. 

Hotel Redondo was built In 1890 at a cost 
of $200,000 and the furnishings, which are 
unusually elegant, cost nearly $100,000 addi- 
tional. The Redondo Railway and the wharf 
were also built at this time and Redondo be- 
came at once an important shipping harbor 
and began to be known as a promising sum- 
mer resort. \Y r ith the laying out of the spa- 
cious grounds surrounding the hotel cottages 
began to spring up in all directions, summer 
homes of the wealthy residents of Los An- 
geles and other nearby places, and the future 
growth of Redondo was thus stimulated and 
its ultimate success as an attractive resort 
assured. 

The hotel has always been popular with 
the society people of Los Angeles as its ar- 
rangements and furnishings indicate at every 
turn a refinement and culture that is seldom 
equaled. 

The interior finish of the hotel in solid oak 
is extremely elegant. The rotunda and en- 
trance hall is one of the most artistic and im- 
posing in the state. The dining room, which 
is almost circular in its effect and so pro- 
vided with windows as to give a nearly unin- 
terrupted view of sea, sky and beautifully 
laid out grounds and ornamental shrubbery, 
is generally conceded to be one of the hand- 
somest refectories ever seen. During the past 
year important additions have been made to 
the conveniences of this hotel in the complete 
steam heating apparatus which not only 
w arms the rotunda, reception rooms, parlors, 
halls and all the living rooms of the house 
but also gives heat for such of the bed rooms 
as are not provided with fire places; hence 
the hotel is equally desirable as a winter resi- 
dence or as a summer visiting place. 

Private baths were added this year for 
twelve suites and new carpeting and general 
refurnishing has put the hotel into better con- 
dition than it has been before since it was 
built. 

With the attractions of excellent golf links 
and exceptionally fine tennis courts, oppor- 
tunities for all kinds of bathing, an unsur- 
passed table and a home atmosphere in the 
hotel it cannot fail of growing prosperity and 
popularity, and there is no seaside resort 
where the guests enjoy a greater diversity or 
more continuous round of gaiety than at 
Redondo. 

This year everyone seems to have been golf 
mad and the links have been a seen of a con- 
tinuous round of golfers intent on lowering 
their scores. The tennis courts have not been 
neglected and each evening has been devoted 
to some special form of gaiety in which old 
and young have entered with that spirit 
which has made everything social attempted 
here such a marked success. The handsomelv 



decorated ball room with its matchless floor 
has been the scene of several brilliant balls 
already this year as well as dozens of infor- 
mal hops and frolics which have been not less 
enjoyable. The billard looms are nightly the 
gathering place of ladies and gentlemen 
alike. 

There are plunge parties every Monday 
evening, the tank being specially reserved for 
the hotel guests and cottagers from the Nob 
Hill district. Hops are given every Wednes- 
day and Saturday evenings and other speci- 
ally arranged social events all go to shorten 
the time and add greatly to the pleasures of 
Redondo's visitors. 

There is nothing lacking at Redondo w hich 
goes to make up the attractions of a modern 
fashionable summer resort and that this is ap- 
preciated is shown by the number of guests 
who flock to this charming spot from the 
heated cities each Sunday and the character 
of those more fortunate individuals who are 
able to spend a portion of the summer in this 
lovely retreat. 

Among Los Angeles people spending the 
summer at Hotel Redondo are Mr. and Mrs. 
John F. Francis, Mrs. Bumiller Hickey and 
daughters, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. A. Off and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hallett, Miss 
Hallett and Homan Hallett, Mrs. C. R. Craig 
and son T. L. Craig, Mrs. Mitchell, Mr. and 
Mrs.Wm. Watson Lovett and three children 
and maid, Mr. and Mrs. Blaisdell and maid, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Burnett and daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. James Swan and Mr. and Mrs. 
C. W. Winston of Pasadena are also at the 
hotel for the season. 



A DAY'S LIFE AT REDONDO 

ONE'S eyes open languidly, for the night's 
sleep has been heavy in the abandon 
from the worries and cares of business. 
Through the open window comes that same 
gentle murmur of the sea that was the last 
dim whisper you heard as Morpheus was 
carrying you away last night. It tempts you 
again; there is a strong inclination to roll 
over for a beauty nap, but the delights of an 
early morning bath in the surf have won so 
many that resolution overcomes inclination 
and in an instant you are at the open window 
drinking the soft morning air, which, for a 
few hours after sunrise while the breeze is 
turning from off the land to a sea breeze, is a 
delicious blend of salty ozone and sweet fra- 
grance from the distant hay fields and the im- 
mense carnation gardens. And now in negli- 
gee you are off to the bath house where a 
quick change is made to a bathing suit. 
Down the steps, across the tide sands, a few 
steps through the frothy remnants of the 
breakers, a plunge into the clear, blue water, 
and the blood is sent tingling to every ex- 
tremity — almost electrical in its stimulating 
effect. After rubbi ng until the skin glows the 
body takes on a feeling of invigoration and 
perfect bloom of health that is a constant sur- 
prise even to the most regular early morning 
bather. 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



Never does the morning meal taste better 
than in the exuberance of physical spirits fol- 
lowing the cool embrace of the briny breakers. 
After breakfast one follows hie fancy as it 
may be: the golfer enjoys a round or so on 
one of the finest links in the country; ihe 
tennis enthusiast becomes more enthusiastic in 
a game on the perfect asphalt courts near the 
hotel; the pedestrian ly inclined, the bicyclist, 
the equestrian and the more luxurious who 
ride behind their horses, are off down the 
beach to the cliff or across the rolling hills 
with their changing, pastoral panoramas; the 
disciples of Jsaac Walton either sail or row 
out to the kelp beds where the bass make 
their home, or sit on the wharves luring a 
variety of fish to their hooks. 

Toward noon the beach becomes anima ed 
with the bathers and few will resist the ;« t - 
tractions of the water and the j lly crowd 
romping in the surf. It is a repetition of the 
pleasure of ihe morning dip, for the air is 
warmer now and the rafts and small boats at 
anchor are all object points for the swimmer, 
and one is apt to prolong his bath till near 
the dinner hour. 

The afternoon is accepted by the beacher 
as a time for rest, listless, brain-building rest. 
A light book, an easy chair and the ozone- 
laden trade winds will woo to quiet relaxation 
as no other influence in the world can. 

The evenings at Redondo are the equal of 
the most favored resorts in the world, and 
women in evening dress promenading the 
bluff walks is no unusual sight. But it is a 
time for indoor pleasures, supplemented with 
bracing draughts of night air in the open. 
The big hotel is the center for pleasure seekers; 
here there are parties and hops, and billiards 
and cards, and new people to meet and the 
friends of yesterday to talk with. There are 
the wide verandahs to wander about, and 
smuke, and think. The same verandahs are 
still there fur lovers to tit in the darker 
shadows, talking and planning. The grande 
dames sit iti the halls watching their pietty 
daughters playing wiih masculine hearts or 
ch .perone a jolly party to a plunge frolic at 
the big tank of warm sea water, electrically 
lighted. But it is a Cinderella place and sel- 
dom can the worldly pleasures retain their 
enticement after the midnight hour. Mor- 
pheus comes so slyly through the open win- 
dow with the starlight and the sighing of the 
sea, and as the late moon peeps over the hills 
he smiles at the peace and contentment of the 
children of the world. 



A l(cdondoite Indeed 
Deputy District Attorney F. R. Willis, 
whose summer home is in Redondo, and who 
acts in the capacity of legal adviser for the 
Board of Trustees of the city of Redondo, is 
quite an enthusiast for this favorite seaside 
resort, and he cannot speak loud enough or 
long enough in praise of his delightful sum- 
mer home. Mr. Willis has resided in Cali- 
fornia — Los Angeles having been his perman- 
ent place of residence — for the past sixteen 
years, and during this period he has been 
identified in a large measure with the political 
affairs of Los Angeles county and city. In 
187!J he graduated from the Iowa State Nor- 
mal School and he then took a course in the 
law department of the State University of 
Iowa, graduating with honors in 1881. After 
a brief practice in the courts of his own State, 
extending over a period of two years, he moved 
to California, and after looking about a bit, 
finally opened an office in Los Angeles in '84, 
and has been engaged in active practice con- 
tinuously ever since. His political life has 
been decidedly active, and his friends in his 
chosen party are legion. In the years '80 and 
'87 he was attorney for the public adminis- 
trator, during which time he handled over 150 
probate cases. His present connection with 
the district attorney's office comprises a con- 
tinuous period from the firstof January, 1895. 
For the past ten years he has served almost 
constantly on either the Republican city or 
county central committees, and part of the 
time on both, and in 1896 was chairman of 
the Los Angeles Republican city convention. 
Mr. Willis is a member of the National Guard 




F. R. WILMS, Esq. 

and has always manifested a lively interest in 
secret society matters, being a Mason, and as 
such past master of Sunset Lodge 2SI0 F. & 
A. M. In the future as in the past he always 
expects to maintain his attachment for and 
interest in the thriving little city of Redondo. 

A THRIFTY BUSINESS MAN 

THE friends of H. L. Yerger, the popular 
and well known tailor, or Harry as he 
is known by his numerous patrons, are legion 
in Los Angeles. 

Back in 1887 he 
first became a citi- 
zen of this south- 
ern metropolis and 
commenced busi- 
ness on a very small 
scale near his pres- 
ent location which 
is at 118 West Sec- 
ond street. While 
his start was small 
and capital in- 
vested at that, time 
far from large, his 
success has been by 
no means of the 
same character. 
His business grew 
and grew until, un- 
like the eagle which 
soared until he be- 
came so sore he 
could no longer 
soar, it grew out of 

his former accommodations and he has found 
it necessary to move into more commodious 
quarters and there seems no limit to the 
growth of his business. These at his present 
place of business he has enlarged giving him 
a room with a frontage of 20 feet and a depth 
of 100 feet, while associated with him in his 
employ are continually from six to a dozen 
efficient workmen constantly kept busy. 

It is a truly interesting sight to visit his 
shop where everything presents a scene of in- 
dustry and prosperity, all accounted for by the 
fact that he always pleases his customers, 
never disappoints them, and always insures a 
perfect fit. The number of new suits of 
clothes turned out of his establishment in a 
year's time is truly marvelous, and while 
Harry has been engaged in the tailoring busi- 
ness for fifteen yearB he is a young man and 
success is undoubtedly ahead of him, as those 
who patronize him once are always made 
friends and are glad to come again. 

His business comprises a large repairing 
department where every item of work pertain- 



ing to the "looking after the sew ing up of ripped 
seams, putting on lost buttons, enlarging of 
garments, when prosperity has added to the 
girth and rotundity of the weaier's figure, 
receive prompt attention. 

Your Sunday best or evening dress suit 
can be nicely pressed for you there on very 
short notice. Undoubtedly there is no place 
where a better fit, a finer quality of garment 
and more genuine all round satisfaction can 
be secured than at Harry Verger's, 118 West 
Second street, or corner second street and Cen- 
ter place. 

A Leading Business House 

The largest and lending general merchan- 
dise store in Redondo is that of C. P. and .1. 
T. Seabert, dealers in staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, house furnishing goods, ship chandlery, 
paints, oils and brushes, coal, wood, hay and 
grain. The Messrs Seabert are but comparative 
new residents of Redondo. having purchased 
the stock of goods at the present desirable 
location, a store room 36x150 feet in dimen- 
sions, corner of Alameda and Emerald streets, 
but a short time ago, and owing to the fact 
that this location is in the business center of 
Redondo and because of the fact that the 
firm is wide awake and energetic, they do the 
lion's share of the business of the commu- 
nity Another fact that renders this a most 
desirable location indeed is because of its 
possession of the postoffice, where the crowds 
congregate at mail time with pleasing regu- 
larity. The object of the firm is to cater to 
the wards of all, by keeping a full line of 
fancy groceries to please the most fastidious 
and also a stock of staple goods at current 
and popular prices, keeping in view at all 
times the wants of the community and pro- 
tecting their interests by careful purchases, 
thus insuring best values for money paid. 




INTERIOR VIEW OK II. I,. YERCiER'S TAII.ORINO ESTABLISHMENT, 
lis WEST SECOND ST., LOS ANGELES. 

Learn to Swim 

If you do not know how to swim this is the 
time to learn, in fact there is no time as good as 
the present to cure yourself of that deficiency. 
Redondo possesses one of the finest swimming 
teachers in Southern California in the person 
of W. 1). Maxey who is a native son, having 
lived in Los Angeles and Southern California 
all his life, and he is indeed a fine specimen 
of manhood, being in the prime of life, strong, 
athletic and vigorous. He has followed his 
profession of swimming teacher along the 
coast for over eight years, five years of I hat 
period having been passed in Kedondo, and he 
expects to pass his summer seasons at this 
favorite resort for many seasons to come and 
will always be found ready to instruct the 
seeker after the mysteries of learning how to 
swim from June 1st to September of each 
year. He is proficient in all styles of the art 
from the breast stroke and side stroke to the 
double and single overhand strokes, including 
fancy spring board and lofty diving. 



12 



Western Graphic 



frou-frou's Cbat 

Of the fads and fashions of Both Scxca 

WOMAN'S headgear is so variable and 
unaccountable that it is an impossi- 
bility to give any set rule by which any style 
of hat may be identified. Too much stress 
cannot be laid, however, upon becomingness. 
A hat cannot be far out of the way if it is 
really becoming. 

This summer the distinguishing feature of 
trimming seems to be the extravagant indul- 
gence in tulle, draped silk, feathers, lace and 
a great variety of most unnatural locking 
flowers. Shown everywhere is a great assort- 
ment of leghorn hats. The leghorn hat, like 
the large picture hats which are so rich and 
dressy, are as usual the popular summer girl 
hat, simple because they are so pliable that 
they can be twisted and trimmed in so many 
different ways that they can be made to take 
on the correct shape and droop and in this 
way be made to look fresh and stylish all 
summer. 

Few colors have ever been so universally 
commended as the new shades of red. There 
is one shad between the old cerese and garnet 
called coral red which is the swell shade for 
this spring, especially in gloves. 

Toques are going to be just as fashionable 
next season as last and are extremely becom- 
ing to most women when worn pushed far 
back from a luxurious pompadour. Speaking 
of pompadours reminds me of what I was 
told by an eastern girl the other day. She 
said: "Why, you have no conception of what 
the pompadour is, and until you visit a swell 
cafe in New York, never will. There you see 
dreams, or night mares perhaps, of pompa- 
dours, built up with curls and rats, etc., all 



around the head from ear to ear and ear again 
which might resemble a big Indian turban." 

Theie has been such a furor for a short 
time for the long quills that it is a wonder to 
me some times where they all come from, and 
is it any wonder they are so popular when 
they are so effective? 

One of the newest outing hats is made of 
felt with rows of silk stitched around the 
outer edge and about the crown Soft felt 
Alpines and medium sized sombreros are worn 
for the closing weeks of the summer season, 
and are a great help to the eyes as they come 
down well over the face and are a great pro- 
tection. The Alpines come in all the popular 
shades. The brims are much wider than be- 
fore and are given a pleasingly feminine ap- 
pearance by the use of a little draped silk and 
a long jaunty quill. 

For general wear and yet producing a 
rather smart effect is a little toque of purple 
or violet fiber which possesses a certain 
amount of elasticity. It is twisted and dented 
to suit the face and is worn far back on the 
head. This toque is simply decorated at the 
left side with huge soft loops of heliotrope, 
liberty satin standing high and under the brim 
lying softly upon the hair are smaller loops. 
To give a finish to the whole thing some pure 
white aigrettes are arranged in the satin. 



All attempts to antiquate the pompadour 
having failed, the fashionable hair dressers 
have only one last resort, and that is to im- 
prove upon the pompadour. This improve- 
ment has proved a very desirable one and is 
accomplished by parting the hair at the front 
and suddenly changing the direction of the 
comb, so that at the end of the part the line 
has curved very much to the left side. This 
gives the coiffure a blown-by-the-wind effect 
which is the delight of every Marlborough 
school girl. 



There is a physical advantage to the parted 
pompadour— the "rat" is done away with. 
These queer little inanimate animals are — the 
expensive ones excepted— often made of sub- 
stances which are highly chemicalized to ob- 
tain a natural appearance, and thus in time 
injure the hair. 

With the parted pompadour the hair is so 
thoroughly waved that it fluffs without the 
aid of any imitations, and in this way the 
head is kept cool. Instead of the little cork- 
screw curls of a season past the stray strands 
which blow about the neck after the coiffure is 
completed are carefully combed up and secured 
in place with a tiny round pin of delicate de- 
sign set with semi-precious stones. 

The simplest way is the best. Being 
already cooked, avoid as far as possible all 

further cooking except in 
To Serve such dishes as are to be 

Boiled Lobster eaten hot, in which case the 

lobster should be merely 
warmed through in the hot sauce or cooked 
quickly, as in cutlets, croquets, etc. 

Lobsters are classed among our indigestible 
foods, but this is quite unfair to the crusta- 
cean, for many people never have the slightest 
difficulty with them. The trouble in many 
cases is probably owing to the high seasoning, 
the wine, the excessive amount of fat and the 
ices and cakes and coffee that are usually 
eaten with them. It is the bad company he 
is in that makes him troublesome. Taken by 
himself, with only a light roll, he is as sweet 
and wholesome as any food. 

A little Second street girl who was trying 
to tell a friend how absent minded her papa 
was, said: "He walks around thinking about 
nothing, and when he remembers it, he then 
forgets that what he thought of was some- 
thing entirely different from what he wanted 
to remem ber." 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 



Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa<e mas- Make nlle halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
sage, Hairdressim:. Shampooing, Human Hair newspaper cute-just , anyhlng you want en- 
Goods of all kinds. Try Cremf. de Acacia graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Sf.com> St. Angeles. 



Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Schlitz 
Lager Beers on draught at all principal saloons 
in the city. Family trade solicited. Phone M U'.s 



Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, an-hes, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chafiu & Kabricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re- 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker. Magazine", 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115)4 N. Main St., Los Ancki.es 

Carriage Works 

A. I. LIKE 

Successor to the Tabor Carriage Works. Car- 
riage painting, trimming and repairing. New 
buggies, etc., made to order. 800-802 Spring 
and X01-X03 S. Main sts. Tel. Main 405. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax- 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Hugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 641 South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Rout. Jordan 

Electrical Contractors 
W000ILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 
Electrical Supplies and Healing Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 10S W. Third St. 

Telephone Main 1125. 



House Cleaning 

JAPANESE HOUSE CLEANING CO. 

All kinds of house work done by the day or 
contract. Price list, 5c per window, SI .50 day 
25c per hour. 653 8. Broadway. Geo. Tanabi 



Photography 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

A rc made at Plaza Photo Gal lery at honest prices. 
To save mouey go where they have light ex 
pensesand can give you your money's worth. 
Plaza Gallery, 518 N. Main. 



Real Estate 

** Mayne finds I b >■ bargains '* 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Heal Kstate Agents 

lis West Fourth St. - - Los A ni; ei.es 

Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and beat equipped in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halftone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New Hich St. - - LosAngei.es 



Veterinary Surgeon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital. 627 South Main 
street Telephones: .Main 1452. White 2131. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Phvsieian and Surgeon, specialist for women 
Office hours : 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

40>£ S. Spring St. - - Los Angeles 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
l Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well In new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



Wines 

TRY OMR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

Guaranteed purity and age. FREE DELIVERY 
Southern California Wink Co. 220 West 
4th St., Los Angeles. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment oa mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

1 31 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4'/i, 5c a roll 

Gilts 7/zC " 

Ingrains 9c " 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2C a ft. 

Window Shades 25c each 

WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



1 



Oldest and Largest Hank in Southern 
California 

Farmers I Merchants Bant 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) J500.000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total 11,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

(i. HEIMANN Assistant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

*S-Speclal Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, sates for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 

ain Street Savings K " 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple St«. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,008 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

r. U DUQUE ~ZZZZZ7. President 

I. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-President 

B. V. DUOUE Cashier 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, K as per Cohn, H. 
W. O'Melveny. L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L Donne, I. N. Van Nuys, W. 0. Kerckhoff, A. 
Haas. 

Park Market 

CUAs. K ks i n Kit, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone Ked 92 5 



Western Graphic 



13 




SANTA MONICA 



SANTA MONICA 

IT will be hard to console Hoy Jones at the 
outcome of the second heat of the swim- 
ming race last Sunday, for the boy who won 
the first heat a week before unsympathetically 
pitched in and won the second and the match, 
thereby knocking Mr. Jones out of one week's 
attraction. But it will make little difference 
at this time, for the crowds line up at the 
bath suit windows like eight-o'clockers at the 
Orpheum. 

Everything is in readiness for the tennis 
tournament next week, when handsome young 
men in their white flannels and ducks and 
blazers and bare arms will struggle across the 
nets to the admiration of hundreds of pretty 
girls in all the bewitching rluftiness that sum- 
mer allows them. Much additional interest 
in the games is being aroused over the state- 
ment that several of the old timers will be 
back in the harness again, and guessing on 
the winners is the guessiest kind of guessing. 

Thursday evening there was a grand bal 
poudre given at the Arcadia Hotel, at which 
the gayest of the butterfly set looked their 
prettiest and enjoyed themselves correspond- 
ingly. Unlike many seasons the weather is so 
delightfully mild that the liveliest dancing is 
not uncomfortable, and then those who are 
given to wilted collars and shiny noses find 
the wide verandahs most delightful cooling 
off places. The patronesses of the affair were 
Mesdames Longstreet, Randolph H. Miner, 
Otheman Stevens and J. C. Drake and the 
Misses Pratt, Woodward, M.Jones and Annette 
Hugos. 

Seven-handed euchre was the entertain- 
ment provided by Mesdames M. A. Wilcox 
and Longstreet Tuesday afternoon for a party 
of ladies, most of whom were grand dames of 
the social set. Appropriate prizes were given 
those making the highest scores, Miss Patti 
Woodward and Miss Percy Hoyle. 

Friday evening the Roy Jones residence on 
Ocean avenue was the 6cene of a small card 
party, Mrs. Jones being the hostess. 

Misses Elizabeth and Florence Modini- 
Wood were the hostesses of a children's party 
given by Mrs. Modini-Wood Thursday after- 
noon. 



TERMINAL ISLAND 

THESE delightful August days are mak- 
ing the lovers of this western Brighton 
Beach more in love with the place every 
whirl of the earth. And why not, with such 
a combination of balmy air, blue skies and 
peaceful water. 

Speaking of Brighton Beach, there is a 
quite movement on foot to change the name of 
Terminal Island to that of the fashionable 
beach of Long Island. Already they apply 
that aristocratic name to the upper end of the 
Island around the Gordon Arms, and it may 
be that by next summer Terminal Island will 
be a name of memory. There are a few who 
think it is snobbish to go clear across the con- 
tinent to find a name to suit the elegance of 
the place— but they don't really care and are 
not likely to make any public objections. 

The young people seem to have had the 
fun this week, though the "old folks" proba- 



bly enjoy themselves just as much with half 
the fuss. Tuesday evening a dozen couple 
were entertained with six-handed euchre at 
Mrs. A. J. Salisbury's, the party being pro- 
nounced a perfect success. Suitable prizes 
were provided and were captured by Albert 
Cook and Miss Josephine Gordon. 

Wednesday evening the old bugaboos, 
Formality and Conventionality, were given 
the cold shake and unconfined joy prevailed 
at a tacky party at the Cordon Arms. There 
were some amusing costumes worn, and the 
beggars, tramps, dairy maids, princesses, far- 
mers and what not apparantly enjoyed the 
freedom from dress suits and perishable gowns 
to the utmost. 

A similar affair will come off Saturday 
evening when the much talked of cake walk 
will hold the boards. Extensive preparations 
are being made and if the winners of the cake 
don't have a case of colic it will be because 
they are very generous about "dividing up." 

CATALINA 

IF there were any more accommodations in 
Avalon there would no doubt be more 
people here, but since the first of the month 




DAN ItUKNS AM) HIS BIG FISH 

it has been a case of cots in the halls, bunk 
on the floor or "double up." But there are 
no end of good times and the character of 
one's sleeping place is the smallest item 
of our pleasures — we don't sleep for fun, we 
sleep because we have to. 

A number of regular visitors have epoken 
of the increase in swimmers among the women. 
But a few seasons ago a woman forty feet 
from shore was a matter for comment, but 
now they may be seen any day independently 
swimming around like ducks, or fish, or — 
well, it wouldn't do to pay like men. 

The honor of the second largest catch of 
fish for the Beaton has fallen to a fifteen-year- 
old boy, Harry Hunt, who in one day with 
rod and reel took forty-three fine fish, includ- 
ing yellowtail, rock bass and white fish. 



.»)'Vr»iV.»iV.-»)V.*iV ; »sV.»>V.»iV.»)V»^V.»'Vr»!« 

Santa monica 
california 

The Now Urlll 



Hotel Arcadia 



H n 

The Hilling 

Koolll 

The 1'urlorn 
All Look 
Town 



It seems to me I'll like to go 
Where bells don't rliiK unr whistles blow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound. 
And I'd have stillness nil mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side," 1 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart Is free, 
That's surely where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
Hut when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lota the best. 
.Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out where the sky is blue, 
Aud say, now, how docs this seem to you.' 

—Eugeue Field, adapted m 

Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 



: 

JOOS 

.rd ths Bi 

i 



Frank A. Miller 

Trop. ^ 




HOMES 

BY THE SE,fl 



Ocean 
Park 



KINNEY & DUDLEY TRACT 

Santa Monica 

Ocean front, Elegant beach, Water pi|«d to tract. 
Electric light connection. I.oug lease, SIO to $25 
yearly rental 

The Best Opportunity Ever Offered to secure a Minta 
Monica Home 

Ocean Air Ocean Beach 



Ocean Bathing 



L. B. OSbORN, Agent 

Oflice, terminus Electric Car Track, Santa Monica. 



' v=7 VS?" VS^ V=7 -<S7-^ •^•^•^ 



Fine Fish 
Dinners 



No tourist considers a visit to California 
complete until he lias visited Santa Monica and 
no one seeking a Summer Itesort thinks of over- 
looking Santa Monica. Eor far and wide has ex- 
tended t!.e fame of the excellent fish, clams, 
mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc . which arc to tie 
obtained at the famous rtstaurant, overlooking 
the ocean. 

TME PAVILION 

ECKEKT & HOl'F, Props. 

^s?^? 



The North Beach 
Bath House 

Has perfected an arrangement by J 

which the water m the plunge will he entirely <| 

changed daily. This year a great deal of money $ 

has been put into permanent improvements in y 

and around the hath house, and it will he the g 

aim of the management to cater to the best class V 

of people, bv providing everything for their Jj 

comfort and convenience. We may say to our q 

jj old patrons that they will hardly recognize the j 
E place on account of changes for the better. 



| OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The S< > nil Uoiiti to 
^anta Moiik a.... 

LEAVE FOURTH ST. , l.os Angeles, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour from 8 JO a m to 7.30 
p.m., S.80, 'J.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LEAVE HANI) STAND, Santa Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three quarter from MS a.m. to 
7.15 p.m., 8.16, 9.45, IV.46. 



"No," said Fido through the fence to the 
tramp dog, "I don't mind heing washed. It 
is such fun to roll in the dirt afterward." 



14 



Western Graphic 



R E DO N D O 




ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 
FROM LOS ANGELES 




* 
m 

* 
* 

9 

* Trail 
Jj Bpec 
* 



Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort 



Finest ami most Commocliona 
Hotel on tlie Pacific Coast. 



Frequent (iolf and Tennis Tourn 
auients. 



Splendid Smf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers 

Here you may get the Finest Pish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
I fining Room in all California. 



sicnt Kates SS.SOtu * I. 
lal Wrrkl} Ratea 



H. R. WARNER, Prop 




i 

Santa Fe Route J 



Summer Time Table 



W Daily S KB VICE 

d Leaves Los Angeles 9.35 a m. 1.30p.m. 5.86 p. ID 

\ Armcs at Kudondo 1(1.85 a. m, '.'.Op. m. S 10 p. Ill 

T 3l M>\Y Si R\ [I I 

S leaves Los Angelea R.80 a. m. 0.53 a. m 
\ 1.3 i p. m. 6.35 p. m 

^ Arrives at Kcdo do 9.10a. m. 10 35 a. m 
J in p. m. 6. In p. in 



U0 [». in. 



Last Train Kctu- uing Leave« Redondo 



d Sunday Concerts by 

^ Seventh Regiment Band 



7 40 [i. HI. 
8.1)0 p. in. 



Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In efl'cct Juue+. 18M; © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Kedondo 

Every dav 9.80 am 1.30 pm 5.30 p m 
Suudavs 8.10 am 9.30 a in '10.45 am 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 7.00 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for l.os Angeles 

Everyday s.nn a m 11.00 a in 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a m 8.00 a m 9.80 a m 
11.00 am 4.15 pm 5 45 pm 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Redondo 6.80pm 

returning leaves Los Ange e< 11.30 p m 4 

i Ci y Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 $ 

£ L.J. PERRY, Superintendent 4 

9 $ 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottages Lighted by Acety- 
lene Gas. (inly Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : : 



£ BUINOY'S 

6 Elsinore 
£ Hot Springs 
f Hotel and Baths 

J E. Z UNOY, Prop. 

W Rates per week — andSlO, includ ELSINORE 
a ing Hot Sulphur Baths. No Con- r \ t 
A sumptives taken : : : ; wAL.. 



CORONADO 

THOUGH the sea never fails as an enter 
tainer, though fishing, boating, yacht- 
ing and strolls along the beach are always on 
the list, golf is a prime favorite. Each day 
finds new golfers on the links taking lessons 
in the art of proper swinging. The lingo of 
of the game supreme is heard on every hand. 
Drivers, brasseys, cleeks, lofters and putters 
are words heard bobbing about in the conver 
sation of the short skirted maid and the golf 
suited youth. While white sails dot the 
ocean, gliding over the blue, the same may be 
said of the golf links, only the short- waisted 
maid is the sail that dots the latter. 

Tallyho parties are busy visiting Point 
Loma, Tia Juana and the mission. The days 
are filled with sight-seeing and pleasure while 
the evening hours give time for the planning 
of the next days outing. 

M Madame Helen Modjeska and Count Boz- 
enta are spending August at the Hotel del 
Coronado. The following members of Ma- 
dame's company are also guests at the hotel: 
Manager J. C. Fisher, Mrs. Fisher, Mr. and 
Mrs. John E. Kellerd of New York, Wads- 
worth Harris of Boston, Percy Winter of the 
same city, and Alfred Bradley of New York 
City, also Clinton Stuart, the play wright, who 
has prepared for Modje?ka a most acceptable 
version of Marie Antoinette. 

Mrs. Hicks and little daughter Elizabeth 
and Mrs. Hicks' brother, Stephen V. Childs 
of Los Angeles, are August guests at the hotel. 
Little Elizabeth is one of the prettiest little 
swimmers among the many frolicing in the 
pool. 

The driving of the piles for the extension 
of the jetty at Hotel del Coronado is about 
completed, much to the delight of would be 
anglers from the new structure. 

Cottages on the beach are in steady de- 
mand. New one are being built and plans 
for others being perfected. 

The club house of the Coronado Golf Club 
is to be enlarged, the contract for two splen- 
did rooms on the bay front having been let 
during the past week. 

Among guests at the hotel may bu noted 
Eben O. McNair, Jr., and Laurence McNair of 
Buffalo, X, Y., Mr. and Mrs. Fellows of Mo 
bile, Ala., Virginia and Adelaide Chambers of 
Colorado Springs, H. M. Cox of Port Huron, 
Mich., E. F. Kingman of Riverside, Chas. »i. 
Weber of New York City, R. H. Stone of 
Jamaica, B.W.I., J. P. Strauss and wife of 
Yokohama, Alexander McBean and wife of 
Oakland, Misses Hamilton, E. Cuthbert Ham- 
ilton and J. Rogden Pierce of New York City. 

Recent arrivals from Los Angeles include 
Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Childs, Mrs. Adam 
Darling, Mrs. M. C. Burnett, Dr. Merritt, E. 
R. Monk, S. Conradi, wife and child, Miss 
Sarah McBride, Lee M. Fitzhugh, Mr. and Mrs. 
Herbert Brown, child and maid, Mrs. J. Gil- 
lette, Mrs. Houghton, Harvey Rire, J. H. 
Brookhouse and others. 

Summer rates at Hotel del Coronado as 
low as $17.50 per week, and $22 includes 
round trip railroad fare, with bus and bag- 
gage from San Diego depot to and from the 
hotel. The cheapest summer outing one can 
take. 

Fuller particulars can be obtained of H. 
F. Norcross, Coronado agent, 200 South 
Spring street. 

Tailoring and Repairing 

Suits made to order, goods the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

H. L. Yerger, 118 West Second Street. 



SANTA C A TALI N A ISLAND 

ftanta caiaiina island 



Three and on. in if hours from Lofl Angele* 
TIi h Greatent Keaorfc 
I h *• Love i e-t Season of t lie Year 

Climate dmi Perfection 

l ' h i' n ii in en si l Pishing and Hunting 

The great Stage lthle 



MeiiKKN HOTEL 
A,, ,NT , ST METROPOLE f 



I n i(| ue excl usi ve a' I Tactions 

The Famed Marine <iardeiis as viewed 

from the glass bottomed boa a 
The lient ami most picturesque Golf Links 
Bound trip every day from Lux Angeles 
Sunday excursions, three hours on the island 
See It. It. time tahiea 



For full information, illustrated pamphlets and 
rates apply to 



Tel. M 3b 



BANNING CO. 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 

hotel just completed^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right outon thk Ocean 
Bath house in connec 
Hates #1 to *4 a day C£*t Hon with hotel. Finest J 
Special rates on 2K beach *f d » nr ' bathing cm 

Application g^S !' oast ;. g? 11 '!i lk8 ' y,'" ;h, : i 

_ ; SiJs lug, fishing. Ten miles of 9 

S. P. Anderson m SMSfas alo,lg ,,each $ 

MANA. iKK |g| lor bicycling. 



I The Attractive Route 



To the Favorite Sea Side 
Resorts is the 



Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




Terminal Island, By the Sea 

Catalina Island San Pedro j 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and 4 

most delightful places % 

and only a short ride from I.os Angeles, where can be <4 

found the finest Open Sea Itatliing, Yachting and y. 
Fishing om the Pacific coast. 

Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket y 1 . 

Office. 214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. ft 

S. B. Uynkk, Gen. Mgr. T. C. Peck, Gen. Agt Pass. Dept. « 



mount Cowc Railway 

Magniticcnt Panorama of Earth and Ocean 
Grandest Trip on Karth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3300 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without hatha. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Traffic mid Kxcursion Agent 



214 South Spring St. 



Los Angeles Cal. 



Tel. Main 960 



Western Graphic 



15 





Amusements 



NO ONE could blame the sweet singers 
of the Lambardi Opera Company for 
hanging onto Los Angeles from clay to day. 
It must be our climate reminds them of their 
own sunny home and they are loth to make a 
start for the eastern cities where they have 
sunstrokes and mad dogs every day. Bat the 
downright truth is not a bit poetical, for these 
people of many vowels are fhy an "angel" 
sufficiently earthly to possess a certain num- 
ber of large, round dollars. If they indulge 
in many more "last appearances" I shall 
expect to see among the musical advertise- 
ments of Westkkn Graphic something like 
"Signor Rossi, teacher of voice, Italian school," 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FI3ST 
AND SECONP 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Aug. 14. 

Cotton & Long, the Californians. in "Maragerial Troubles." 

I.a Fafalla, Dancing Sensation of the Nineteenth Century. 

Dave Meier. Champion Bag Puncher of the World. 

.lot*. Aflelinati, a Positive Novelty. 

I. aura Joyc« Hell anil her Jolly Company. 

Klizabetli Murray, the Empres- of Dialect Artists 

The Bldridgi », in Coon Town Frolics. 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; iic to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



T 



HERE IS JUST ONE 



LOS ANGELES CLOTHING STORE | 

WE are it 



SUITS, $20 oo down 



Yocr Money Back 
if vou waut it 



LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY 

I 17 to 125 North Spring St. 



P~R~0 FESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



ELIZABETH A. FOLLANSBEE Office hours 8to9a.m 
315 SO. BROADWAY 
Rooms : 882434 Laughlln Building Tel. Main 7:i7 

JOSEPH KURTZ 

Office, 147 SOUTH MAIN, 
Hours: '.' a.m. to 12 m., 1 to 6 p.m. 

H S. ORME 

415 117 DOUGLAS BLDG 
Third and Spring Streets 



Tels. 



Tel. Main 9K. 



(Office Main 6*0 
I Res. Main :i00 



RKMoKNCK 
!l , N. BINKFK HILL 



Hours— 10-12 a.m. 
2-4 p.m. 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

328 330 WILCOX BUILDING 
Tel. Main (ill BMDBRCfi THE LOCKE 

DKNTIS1 S 



D. CAVE 

LANKERSKIM BLOCK 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1515 



SGHRflMSBtRG 

...WINES... 



The Host Famous of California 



m% Light, Delicate Wines, |§|| 



•BOSSQl 




great care at the Vineyard 



PACIFIC COAST AOCN-TS 



; Sherwood & Sherwood 

^ ^ Lo g Angeles San Francisco Portla nd ^ J 



etc. However, we would not be ashamed 0* 
them if the whole company settled down here. 

MR. MOROSCO has not made any defi- 
nite announcements as to the Hurhank 
theatre except that he will open the house 
with something good the first week in Sep- 
tember. Everyone will join in the hope that 
he gets off on the right foot, for outside of the 
miserable acoustics the Hurhank is an extra 
comfortable theatre. 



TVTOTHING in the way of managerial edicts 
1 have pleased patrons of the Orpheum 
so much as the rule that late comers can not 
be seated until the end of an act; and it is 
noticeable that the numbers of the would be 
nuisances are becoming agreeably less each 
week. Perhaps Mr. Hronson, the new man- 
ager, will pardon a friendly suggestion, and 
it is to compel the programmer to use ink 
instead of tar in the printing of the program, 
which typographically is an eyesore at the 
best. Hundreds of pairs of gloves have been 
utterly ruined by their owners handling the 
messy things and no doubt many men have 
been forced down the first step to bad tempers 
by getting their hands all smeared with the 
vile stuff off the theatrical bill of fare. 

What people can see to commend in the 
harrowing spectacle of a man and woman 
making alleged fun of the loss of a leg, wav- 
ing the stump about in the air, beats me. 
Enough to say, however, the thin applause 
plainly showed that the "attraction" was 
acceptable to but a small part of the Orph- 
eum's clientelle. 

Laura Joyce Bell (and company) has 
come. She has been seen, and — well, does her 
part of an old skit first rate. It is Mis. Bell's 
fault that lean not write a line of superlative 
adjectives. She has evidently misjudged vau- 
deville and thinks half hearted work and 
indifferent support will make good. It is a 
lesson the "legitimates" all have to learn, 
but it is too bad Los Ange'es had to furnish 
part of the tuition, for Mrs. Bell has long 
been a favorite in her field among those who 
know worth when they see it. 

Elizabeth Murray has a walk and a way, 
and she tells stories piquantly, even if she 
does wander into boiler-plate yarns. Then 
she has the charm that marks a southern 
woman, and that charm would win over a 
multitude of minor defects. 

Miss Palmer earns her salary very easily 
this week, a little hop, step and" a song or two 
being her mite towards the evening's enter- 
tainment. At a rough guess I should say she 
made money at the rate of about four dollars 
a minute while she was on the stage. 

Orpheum Idaleno Cotton and Nick Long, a 
couple of California youngsters, are the stars of the 
coming week's bill at the Orpheum. Miss Cotton is 
a Native Danghter and Long a Native Son, and their 
welcome by their comrades will undoubtedly amount 
to an ovation. Miss Cotton is considered one of tho 
best impersonators of stage celebrities in tho world 
antl Long is an able second to her performance. 

La Fafalla, a spectacular dancer, comes heralded 
as tho rival of Lois Fuller, I'apinta and other famous 
dancers. La Fafalla has a aeries of brilliant Stage 
pictures in her performance. I he liko of which, ac- 
cording to eastern critics, has not before been con- 
ceived by other spectacular artists. 

Dave Meier will provide a novel entertainment. 
Be la the champion bag puncher of tho world. Be 
can even punch the swinging sphere in rag time. 

Fran/ Adelman, a well known xylophono player; 
Laura Joyce Hell and her clever company of players; 
Elizabeth Murray, the story teller and singer; and 
tho Kldridges, colored comedians, are on tho new 
bill. 

Los Angeles Theater. 'The Barber of Seville" 
will bo sung by tho Italians this afternoon, antl to 
night they will give tho double bill of "I' Pagliacci" 
antl "'Cavalleria Kusticana " Tho casts will bo tho 
best of the company, and that means superlatively 
tine music, 



I IfpTEL MiTinmt \ 

\ u u Se\enth and Olive Sts , Los Angeles f 




EUR0PKAN PLAN- 
ELEGANT SUITS Kates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Pass the Doors 



Correspondence 

Promptly 

Auswered 



II. HoOOM BOA I. 

Proprietor 



St- Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding and Day College for 
Young Men and Boys 

. .'THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com 
* mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Hachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of A rts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

the Tall form Begins on monday, September 4th 

For further information, send for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A LINN, C. M. 



LADIES „* Jt 




Have you r freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

(' tl t'lll t H t 

»*»Z •AHPrict 50 ch, 

Noi l ii m Bin Street 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Cbc palace 

A Snivel Kniilily It*' ort 

Pitronlzed by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly lilted, co<d In Hummer 
and wnrin In Winter. The Her In hmnlly Orchestra In 
attendance Free concert every evening from H to 
12 o'clock. Kelincd music. No Vaudeville 
BvitottrAftl end RefreititntMiti 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

KHpeclu 1 1 y \iltiplcd la 

AfiBi Theater partial 
The Palace Restaurant Company ■ 



WARDROBES 

Made of Hoi id Oak // 
Golden Finish— (food Values y 

FOLDING BEDS 




ftVr^WTW/^. I.I. MAKTIN. S3I-53S So. S«rmj Jl. 
a vUlkLjv?— Wheel Chair* sold or rente. I 



uring II. ^ 



s 




DEAN FA KHAR OF CANTERBURY. 

Gradually conservative Knglawl has relented in its opposition to .Sunday cycling. 
Dr. Karrai . (lean of Canterhury and one of the most distinguished officers of the estab- 
lished oil' oh in England, gave to the cyclists permission to parade at Canterbury on 
Sunday, y 16, and invited them to hear an address appnmriate to the occasi"" 



B IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 

p «^b™^™b™m—««^™bbbbbbbb™ p or cleaning garments and 

all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

W 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 




"Itlooks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 



5 pend the Summer 



AT 



1 



San Diego and 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



June 16 and 17 
July I and 2 



August 4 and 5 
September I and 2 



Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

Inquire of Santa Fe Route Agent -'00 South Spring Street (cor. 2nd) Los Ang 



Gardening fa 
California * * 




W. S. LYON 




New 
Edition 
Just Out! 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
Zflolteers in Southern 
California 

Written for ifiis Soil and Climate 
J2icehj "[[lustraled 
Svenj lover of tffozvers sftoufd have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) ""SSSSS^ 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 



F)RI INTERS 
_ UBLISHERS 



AND 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for us to 
handle to your entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 

Tel. M. 1053 LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



<x^j BUCCK8SOK TO £>> 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



701 South Main Street 



ioi>oecoB« 



Electrical Repairing 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=CIass Machine Work 



JOHN Q. TUFTS, J* 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo. Kice & Sons (Inc..) 311 313 N<w Hieh 8treet 



Western Graphic 




CUPVRIfiHTKD l* 5 ? 



Volume VII. 
Number 8. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 19, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 




Western Graphic 



McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 




An August Shirt Event 



• •CKYERAL Hundred Dozens of the finest shirts that have 
come to Los Angeles this season at from one-fourth to 
one-third less than the regular retail price of yesterday. Our 
entire stock of fine golf shirts is included in this sale. The 
materials are beautiful quality of imported and American ma- 
dras and cheviot cloths. Toe woven goods, mind you, not the 
cheap printed calicoes. The styles and colorings are beautiful. 
New round corner laundered cuffs to match each shirt. 

The $1.50 and $1.75 golf shirts now at $1.25 

The $1.00 quality golf shirts now at 75c 

We also have about 400 shirts of the finest woven light weight 
materials made negligee style with collar and cuffs attached. 
Nicely laundered ready to use. 

The 75c, $1.00 and $1.25 grade now at 50c. All siz< s and 
lengths of sleeves in these shirts. 

CALIFORNIA BLANKETS— Just the thing for campers and seaside cottages 
$2.95 a Pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 

317=325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth 



Western Graphic 

Spin LH^nfAirD witiUY lfe^*»te 

Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffiee in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Three Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 
Sngile Copies, Edition de Luxe. Ten Cents. 

'$~ l.~i / . ~]**U. l.~i*~U*L.~u*L--*l. Ji..^. Joseph Ma 1KB, George Zobei.kin & 

Pres. and Trcas. Vice-Pres. and Sec'y f 4 

1 

HOME INDUSTRY A 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME ^ 




444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TEL. M. 91. 



Maier k Zobelein 

Brewery 



WHERE THE PRESIDENT RESTiol?. 

President MiKinlcv selected a picturesque spot for his vacation this sunnv.;-: 
The Hotel ChampUtiu ii l> Mill if ully situated on Lake < 'haniplain, near Plattsburg, 
N. Y. The scenery in the vicinity U unsurpassed, the air is invig.e aling and the nppor- 





tunities for recreation are numerous. It is an excellent place for the tired man of 
affairs to recuperate. While at Lake Champlain the president's aim was to be as free 
as possible from the worries of state, so that liis vacation might be in fact a holiday. 
With slight exceptions this idea has been carried out. 



A 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



ROUND TRIP I 

50c 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.1 5 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



Jt> Jt> (Jood Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



jt J- Fast Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9-35 P-m- 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



ft 



ROSE PURITY WATER 



EN CORPORATE!) 



r) Los /fqge/es 




. . . PURE NATURAL SPRING WATER from Highland den, California The 

analysis of ROSE PURITY WATER shows it to contain the most healthful properties known f.r 
Constipation, Indigestion and Kidney difficulties. All physicians knowing this water recommend 
its use. It is nicely furnished In one and live-gallon glass packages. Delivered to all points of the 
city and towns through our agents. It is cool and clear as crystal as it runs from the Spring Rock 
Fountain head. It is not a dead water; its virtue for halth is Spirit, Life and Purity. 

If any person not knowing or using this water will visit us within ;!0 days, will be entitled 
to the extent of five gallons FREE, each party bringing his bottle. 

For orders address 

LAMB & WHITNEY, 

P \ S A DENA AND 4»th Al KM KS 



LOS AM.KI.KS. CAL. 
Tel. Soli Matic.o 1(> 



212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses in Rook-keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



♦ A, oulpnur opnngs and Baths 



www vvvvry 



-Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 



« These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of % 
g Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. ;> 

A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress § 



NOT1CK OF FORECLOSURK SALE 

Sheriff's Sale, No. 3-J146. 

J. M. Elliott and H. T. Lee, as Trustees for 
Jessie P. Church, plaintifls, vs. Minnie S. Serrot, 
the said Minnie Serrot and J. \V. Gillette and \V. 
W. Widney as Ex cutors of the Will of Charles 
E. Serrot, deceased, Marcus Serrot and Thomas 
Serrot, defendants. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an iir.U-r of Bale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Ix>s Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 18th day of July, 
A.D., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in J. M. Elliott, et al., the above named 
plaintlfls, obtained a judgment and decree of 
foreclosure and sale against Minnie S. Serrot, 
et al., defe ndants, on the '27th day of June, 
A.D. IBM, for the sum of Seventeen Hui dred 
and Fourteen and 10-lOu Hollars, gold coin of the 
United states, which said decree was, on the 
:tt)th day of June, A. D. 1899, recorded 
In Judgment Book 85 of said Court, 
at page 1, I am commanded to sell all lhat 
certain lot, piece, or parcel of land situate, 
lying and being In the county of Los Angeles, 
state of California, and bounded and described 



as follows: Lot Thirteen (18) of Hodgkin's Suh 
division of Lot Kighty-s ven (s7) and Eightv- 
eight (NS) of Watt's Subdivision of part of the 
Kanclio San Rufael, according to the m8p of 
said Hodgkin's Subdivision, recorded in Hook 
o, page r i7C of the Miscellaneous Recurdsof Los 
Angeles County, California. Together with Ten 
(10) shares of the capital stock of the Sycamoic 
Canyon Water Company of San Rafael, Los 
Angeles County, California. 

Together with all and singular the tenements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto be- 
longing, or in auywNc appertaining. 

Public notice is herebv given that on Tuesday, 
the Sth day of August, A. D. 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M . of that day, in front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance. 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with Interest 
and cost-, etc., to flie highest and best bidder, 
for cash, gold coin of the U. S. 

Dated this 13th day ol Julv, 1899. 

W. A. HAMMEL. 
SherifT of Los Angeles County 

By STEPHEN ALDEN. Deputy Sheriff. 

Messrs. Scott, Plaintiff's Attorneys. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



. V 8 ,L Los Angeles, Saturday, August 19, 1899. Jg^ 



Volume 
Number 



Western Gmplik; 

OEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. truman :-: :-: :-: kditor 

IRWIN H. RICE >: ASSOCIATE KDITOR 




THERE is a wonderful amount of wild 
talk, on the part of those who like to 
pose as anti-expansionists, about the right of 
the Filipinos to independence, and the claim 
is made that the denial of this 
The Right of " right " is a violation of the 
tndependence principles annunciated in the 
Declaration of Independence. 
That immortal document nowhere affirms the 
right of a people to independence other than 
as a means to escape from an abridgement of 
their liberties. The averment that " We hold 
these truths to be self-evident: that all men 
are created free and equal; that they are en- 
dowed by their Creator with certain unalienable 
rights; that among these are life, liberty and 
the pursuit of happiness," is the predicate 
upon which is based the further declaration 
that, "To secure these rights governments are 
instituted among men, deriving their just 
powers from the consent of the governed; that 
whenever any form of government becomes 
destructive of these ends it is the right of the 
people to alter or abolish it;" and as a justifi- 
cation of the purpose of Congress to declare 
the colonies free and independent, an indict- 
ment was drawn up against^the king for a vio- 
lation of these God-given rights. Nowhere is 
it claimed that the right of independence is 
inherent; it arises only from the failure of the 
governing power to give liberty to the people. 
The central and controlling idea is liberty, 
and the matter of independence was considered 
of minor importance by the members of the 
Continental Congress. 

The attempt being made by the " aunties " 
to compare the situation in the Philippines 
with that which confronted the American 
colonies in 1776 is a dismal failure. The 
purpose of the American rebellion from the 
rule of Great Britain was not in its inception 
to attain the independence of the colonies but 
to maintain the rights which under the Magna 
Charta belonged to all subjects of the king, 
and the Declaration was but the extension and 
elaboration of the rights which had been 
wrestled from King John and a long line of 
his unwilling successors; the idea of inde- 
pendence only arose as a last resort to attain 
the end sought. The Philippine rebels have 
no conception of what liberty is, and their 
whole contention is for independence, their 
actions showing their idea of liberty is an 
independence which gives to self-elected rulers 
the power to establish an absolute despotism. 
Of the rights of the common people they have 
no conception, their highest ideal of govern- 
ment being to build up a despotism akin to 
that established under the power of Spain. 



There can be no question of the right of 
the United States to exercise sovereignty over 
the Philippines. Our jurisdiction came to us 
by right of conquest, and is acknowledged by 
every nation on the globe. As the lawyers 
would say, it is at all fours with the acquisi- 
tion of the territory obtained from France, 
Spain and Russia by purchase, and from 
Mexico by conquest. Jefferson, whom the 
anti-expansionists claim as their political an- 
cestor, was the president who inaugurated 
national expansion, and by the purchase of 
Louisiana the nation not only acquired a vast 
area of territory but obtained jurisdiction 
over an alien people, whose language and po- 
litical ideas were antipodal to those of the 
original colonies. The Catholic French of the 
Gulf had nothing in common with the Prot- 
estants of New England, and yet their opin- 
ions were not taken into consideration by 
Jefferson. The same holds true with all our 
acquisitions of territory. Sovereignty has al- 
ways been acquired without a plebiscite, and 
under our form of government the rights of 
the inhabitants are not affected by the acqui- 
sition of the territory but by the character of 
the government accorded to the people. If 
the rights of the inhabitants as defined in the 
Declaration of Independence and elaborated 
in the Constitution are infringed, then the 
people of the newly acquired territory would 
undoubtedly have a right to protest, and if 
their protests were not considered and their 
grievances righted, they would undoubtedly 
be justified in declaring their independence 
and invoking the god of war. Rut until the 
government has had time to establish a form 
of law the mere exercise of sovereignty can- 
not be made an excuse for war. Certainly the 
only course open to the government, when the 
national authority is questioned and war made 
upon the flag, is to strike down the opposing 
power. Rebellion is not one whit less treason- 
able in the Philippines than in America. 

In the case of the Fili-pinos the war upon 
the authority of the United States began be- 
fore the treaty of peace was signed and before 
sovereignty had been acquired. This has 
made it impossible to inaugurate any form of 
civil government; and this has made it im- 
perative that the islands be brought under 
subjection, in order that tranquility may be 
maintained during the period of transition 
from a state of war to one of civil government. 

Congress has as yet taken no action as to 
what form of government shall be established 
in the islands. In the meantime the President 
can only rule as commander-in-chief of the 
army, and what he does is only to maintain 
the supremacy of the national authority. 
He can have no policy extending beyond 
the time when statute law goes into force — 
his whole duty is performed when he holds 
the power and sovereignty of the nation intact, 
and should he fail in this duty he would 
become liable to impeachment by Congress. 
But in this matter President McKinley has 
pursued a patriotic and consistent course, 
firmly upholding the sovereignty of the na- 
tion, but at the same time protecting, in bo far 
as has been in his power, the people of the 
Philippines in all the rights which the Consti- 
tution guarantees to the citizens of the Re- 
public. 

Wkstkkn QbapHIO is decidedly in favor of 
municipal ownership of the water system and 



de Luxe 
a Copy 



will be found advocating such a measure 
when there is an economic plan proposed to 
that end. So far over $7o,000 has been ex- 
pended by the city in this water squabble, 
and it would have been better \ c not one cent 
of it had been used, as the results have really 
been worse than if no attempt had been made 
in the matter. It looks very much as if the 
so called efforts of our politicians have been 
made for the very purpose of muddling the 
matter and fooling the people. There is a 
right way and a wrong way, and the wrong 
way has been adopted and municipal owner- 
ship can never be accomplished under it. The 
proposed plan would, so our engineers of 
prominence figure it out, "make water cost 
the consumers more than it does at present." 
It would become such a power to the party 
in power that the city would be governed by 
the bosses. Taxes are already high enough, 
and as they are at present capital hesitates 
to engage in any great enterprises, and with 
the doubling or trebling of tixes the city 
would become entirely prostrated and no 
amount of rain would improve the Conditions. 
Already eeveral enterprises, that would give 
employment to many men, are held in abey- 
ance until it is settled whether tax rates will 
be increased to a point of confiscation. 

The best legal talent pronounces the present 
plan of voting bonds to buy water as illegal, 
and it is best to stop the useless expenditure 
of money, that the city has not got, rather 
than to vote bonds and plunge the city into a 
bankrupt condition and destroy its business. 

Jesse H. Arnold, in a letter to the Herald, 
has figured it out and shows very conclusively 
that water would cost the individual more 
under city management than he has to pay 
now and that the city would besides be over 
burdened with taxation. About the only 
people who can favor voting bonds under the 
present conditions are those who pledged 
themselves to municipal ownership, those 
who in their blind prejudice are "ferninst" 
capital and progress and those who expect a 
job out of the new conditions. 

It is a mistake at this time to still further 
muddle the question of municipal ownership, 
which of itself is correct 

What about the school bonds? Has the 
scramble to mulct the city or the water corn- 
pan}' entirely overshadowed the importance 
of whether we shall have ample school facil- 
ities? The question has been divided so that 
voters can favor either grammar school or 
high school bonds, both or none. The gram- 
mar school bonds are sure to carry and the 
high school bonds ought to. Vote next Tues- 
day, August 22. 

The more carefully one pursues the drama 
at Rennes tho more vividly one's mind goes 
back to the story of the man in the iron mask 
and to the days when the old doges of Venice 
covered up their dreadful crimes wi'h human 
sacrifices. "If the German Emperor would 
only speak," exclaims some one. Ves, if God 
had only spoken at Calvary. 

The inside meaning of the brutal action of 
the judges in the Dreyfus case following the 
shooting of M. Labori no American will pre- 
sume to guess. Their proceeding with the 
trial of the celebrated case while the lead- 
ing counsel for the defense was still writh- 
ing under the shock of a wound by an 
assassin is a sad commentary on the boasted 
chivalry and fine sense of honor of French- 
men. Where is there an American or Knglish 
court that under like circumstances would not 
have immediately adjourned, if not from a 
point of justice to the defendant, at leapt out 
of respect for the integrity and ability of the 
wounded lawyer? 



Western Graphic 




Observations of the Owl 



AS a notable example of abiding faith that 
the birds will come again let me com- 
mend to those landlords that erase not from 
the windows of their vacated office rooms the 
gaudy signs of nomadic wonder-cure doctors, 
who, after a brief season, re- 
Snckers Born moved their presence else- 
Every Minute where. The landlords know 
that when the sere and yellow 
leaf shall flutter in the eastern autumnal 
gale the "doctors" will come again and, find- 
ing signs already blazoned, will rent the 
rooms and adopt the name of the departed 
tenant, or such part as may suit without pre- 
senting too painful a reminder to creditors 
that ceased not to mourn. The windows of 
one suite of offices present in their golden 
lettering memorial tablets to one departed 
genius who may not come again or be closely 
emulated next winter. A bright newspaper 
man from New York tried in vain to secure a 
situation in Los Angeles, where always there 
are journalistic brains going to waste. He 
gave it up, and though he never even thought 
he was a doctor he adopted a name that had 
an Oriental sound, established a flourish- 
ing business in the sale of a patent medicine, 
advertised boldly and thrived amazingly. At 
any rate his one season's business enabled 
him to ride out of town, leaving behind him 
various bills. To this day his advertisements 
adorn the bill boarde, and some successor 
may come along some day, rent the vacated 
rooms and have the advantage of the ready 

made signs. 

From many points of view one must de- 
plore the publicity that haB been given to the 
announcement that a Pasadena man has in- 
vented and patented soine- 
Skates thing new in skates. From 

and Skates the published news item, in- 
nocently set afloat along with 
more i nocuous paragraphs, persons that are 
unfamiliar with the climatic disadvantages of 
Pasadena as a place for outdoor skating on 
ice will derive an erroneous impression. To 
those that know Pasadena's predilection for 
prohibition the announcement will cause the 
belief that if any genius there has really 
evolved anything new in "skates" he must 
have come to Los Angeles for inspiration. 

Health Officer Powers says that though it 
is quite true, as I said a fortnight ago, that 
milkmen will admit to him that they use 
deleterious drugs for preserv- 
Dnigged Milk ing milk, they will deny it in 
is Deadly police court, and nothing 

6hort of expert testimony, 
backed by analysis obtained in a chemical 
laboratory, will convict the dairymen of a 
practice that is ruining stomachs and is kill- 
ing children. The very thought of using a 
smallpox disinfectant, the germacide known 
as formalin, for "embalming" milk to be fed 
to invalids and to children, as well as to 
others better able to stand such alimental 
abuse, is repugnant. If there is no way to 
stop the dairymen's deadly drugging the 
more'8 the pity. 



For the brief space of a few days Herman 
.Silver, president of the Council, was acting 
mayor, and he filled the position with grace 

and dignity that showed how 
Playing lie naturally he would fit into 
Was Mayor the office for a couple or four 

years. Mayor Eaton, at Cat- 
alina, forgetful of the cares of state, well knew 
the city was safe in the keeping of the presi- 
dent of the Council. 

Governor Gage tells me that now that he 
has no more offices to give out he really likes 

to come back to Los Angeles 
Governor occasionally. Though he 

Feels Free sometimes feels deeply pained 

because of the changed man- 
ner of some friends that failed to get a job, 
the chief executive of California has the 
opportunity, enjoyed in greater or less degree 
by other men, of determining the real value 
of previous protestations. 

Thus far this season almost every Southern 
California seashore resort has had a gallant 
rescue of a drowning young 
Son/, May woman by the professional 
be Real swimming teacher who con- 

ducts a "swimming school" 
near by. Some of these rescues were most 
opportune and a'l were fortunate for the fame 
of the amphibious professor. That these per- 
formances are sometimes prearranged need 
take nothing from the glory of an extempora- 
neous display of prowess in the art of saving 
life. 

There is reason to fear that a feeling of 
rivalry is about to manifest itself in those 
amiable Republicans and councilmen, Mr. 

Toll of the Fifth ward and 
doing the Mr. Vetter of the Third. Both 

Same Way hope some day to be mayor, it 
is true; but who among us 
does not? Though the statesmen now and 
then seem inclined to crowd each other off the 
well-worn stepping stones to their coveted 
goal they both are feeling carefully the way. 

In a pending contest between two railroad 
corporations over an advantage that one seeks 
and the other defends at San Pedro, much has 

been said against the grant- 
Fighting for ing of a franchise for what 
a Ferry would not be a "public ferry," 

and where is there one that 
is not operated for the benefit of its owners? 
The raft that alternates between banks on 
Mud creek? The famed transport of Charon 
on the River Styx? These are public ferries. 
The traveler is expected to leave a fee for the 
owner of the raft, and do not all shades for 
the under world carry with them the coin for 
toll across the dark river? Go travel in the 
western wilds where rolls the turbid tide of 
the unbridged stream or dive into your classic 
dictionary and find that neither there nor on 
the bosom of East river nor the bay of San 
Francisco is there such a thing as a public 
ferry for the use of the public alone. All 
ferries are public, as railroads are public. 



Because of an unexpected and unusual 
amount of wisdom he displayed a Riverside 
justice of the peace is likely to lose caste 

among his contemporary 
One Sensible Dogberrys. That he should 
Justice have sentenced some juvenile 

fruit pilferers to a sound 
strapping at the hands of their respective 
parents when he could just as well have 
helped them to criminal careers by immuring 
them in jail is somewhat beyond the under- 
standable range of the average justice with 
glabrous head and geophonic eyes. 

W. R. Ream. 

Didn't Keep Them. 

"I wan't some kind of a door-spring— one 
that won't get of order," said a customer to a 
hardware man. 

"A door-spring?" 

"Yes; and one that will not require the 
strength of an elephant to open." 
"Hem!" 

"And must be strong enough to bring the 
door all the way to, and not leave it swinging 
open a couple of inches." 

"I see." 

"And when the door closes I don't want it 
to shut like a catapult, with a jar that shakes 
the house from its foundation." 

"Yes. You want one that will bring the 
door all the way to, and do it gently." 

"That is the idea. But I do not want any 
complicated arrangement that requires a 
skilled mechanic to attend to." 

"No — of course not. You want something 
simple yet strong and effective?" 

"Just so! Something that can be put on 
or taken off easily — something that will do its 
work quietly yet thoroughly, and will not be 
eternally getting out of order." 

"I see. I know exactly what you wan't, 
sir; just exactly." 

"Well, show me one." 

"We don't keep door springs." 

A Corpse at a Wedding 

J. A. Carson and Miss May Cranston, a 
young couple residing on Kootenai Lake, 
Washington, were married last June, under 
circumstances seldom paralleled in fiction. 
The preacher who was to lie the knot failed to 
appear at the home of the bride at the ap- 
pointed time, 60 the bridal couple and rela- 
tives boarded the 6teamer Klondike on her 
trip down the Columbia river to Bonner's 
Ferry, Idaho, having decided to be married 
there. In passing the missing preacher's 
ranch down the river he was found a prisoner 
on the roof of his submerged residence, the 
valley having become flooded by a sudden 
rise in the river. He was rescued and taken 
aboard the steamer. 

While he was changing his wet clothes the 
st;amer made a stop at Rice's Landing and 
two passengers came aboard with a rough pine 
coffin containing the corpse of James Carter, 
who was drowned in the river the day before. 
A bulldog also accompanied the men. When 
the preacher came on deck wearing a suit of 
Capt. Newman's clothes the bridal couple an- 
nounced that they would have the wedding 
take place then and there. 

The ceremony had proceeded almost to the 
point where the preacher was about to pro- 
nounce them husband and wife when Capt. 
Newman's dog and the bulldog got into a 
fight. In the midst of it they upset the coffin 
which had been deposited on a couple of 
beer kegs As it struck the deck the home- 
made coffin burst open, spilling out the corpse. 
One glance at the dead man's features and the 
bride gave a scream and swooned away in the 
arms of the groom, for the corpse was that of 
a former lover to whom she had been engaged. 



Western Graphic fi 
fi fi fi H darning to Bathers fi fi fi 

Or, fln Idyl to the Raft 




frou-frou's Cbat 

Of the fads and fashions of Both Sexes 

AT FIRST thought there seems to he 
very little or no opportunity for fads or 
fashions in men's affairs, but if you mention 
such a thing to a really fashionable man he 
will probably reply in such a way that you 
will feel that you have at least made quite a 
mistake. It is my intention to give a few lit- 
tle hints, occasionally, which may be of some 
interest to my gentlemen readers, or perhaps 
their wives, and then incidentally to the men. 
If a man is inclined to be luxurious in his 
dress he can indulge this weakness very nearly 
as extravagantly as his lady friends. For in- 
stance, in the matter of socks. Of course they 
are all of the finest silk and then they are 
tach embroidered by some fair hand, either in 
some fanciful design or, what is the rage 
again in the east, the monogram of the wearer. 
A pretty way to have one's black f ilk socks 
embroidered is with a varied assortment of 
clocks, and surrounding each clock is the mon- 
ogram worked out in some bright color, us- 
ually yellow. By the way, monograms are 
the correct thing everywhere and anywhere 
they can be used. I was reading a description 
of some very fastidious New York swell the 
other day, and I remember it mentioned his 
large assortment of waistcoats with their solid 
gold buttons, each with his monogram en- 
graved upon it. 

Now that golf has come in earnest and so 
many have adopted it as their favorite, we 
will be looking for new ideas in golf acces- 



„< „«* ,•*•*.•*..<* w «t j>t „<< j* v * 



sorie?, for was ever such an opportunity offered 
for variety? A gentleman in the east predicts 
that golf capes are going to be worn by the 
men this winter with their golf suits. This 
will certainly lend a very jaunty and artistic 
effect to their costumes. 



The newest golf hat is an alpine of soft 
felt in gray, brown or tan, scattered with 
somewhat blurred colored spots, and trimmed 
with a folded silk band matching the spots in 
color. For instance, one cri the best looking 
of these golf hats is light gray flecked with 
pale blue spots, while the crown is encircled 
with a blue band laid in folds. Golf and bi- 
cycle knickers are tighter than they were last 
year and the cuff is laced at the side instead 
of buttoned. 

For gentlemen the open work or perforated 
leather belt with gilt buckles are quite En- 
glish, you know, while for ladies the correct 
thing is the dog-collar belt with silver spikes. 
Speaking of belts reminds me of an exquisite 
novelty in a belt bag I was shown recently, 
an engagement gift to one of our future brides. 
This bag is not to hold money, but on the 
contrary only intended for the fair creature's 
delicately scented handkerchief. To be exact, 
it is a clever adaptation of our dear old grand- 
mother's silk bag, which was at that time sus- 
pended from her wrist, which was covered with 
a silk mitten. This bag or chatelaine is at- 
tached to the belt and differs from those in- 
tended to hold money principally in the open 
ing, which extends more than half way around 
the bag. This little trifle, which probably 
only cost about a hundred dollars, is made up 
of solid gold rings which grow smaller and 



finer from the outer edge to the center. The 
clasp is heavily chased with flowers and the 
top is fitted with a hook to slip in the belt 
that encircles her waist. 

There are now so many pretty things in 
the way of card cases, purses, etc., on the 
way that when the women come home from 
their various outings to do their fall shopping 
they will be surprised to see what is in store 
for them. Among the newest effects in change 
purees are some horseshoe-shaped lockets 
made of heavy light-colored pigskin. These 
are ornamented with a large gold or silver 
monogram. The handle is a small strap of 
leather through which Miladi can slip her 
hand without danger of mislaying her purse, 
but this would hardly be practical for those 
who use their pocketbooks to carry their call- 
ing list, note book and all |their last month's 
receipts and various other memorandums A 
very pretty novelty for a gentleman is a letter 
case of sea-lion skin with a monogram of solid 
gold on its side. The color is a deep gray. 
The grain of leather is fine and uneven. Here 
and there are little indentations shaped like 
pin pricks. The quality is so soft and smooth 
and fine that the touch recalls oozy calf. The 
odor is oily and barely suggests a combination 
of sandal wood and old-fashioned musk. This 
case is lined with moire antique silk the color 
of the leather. Inside are two pockets for let- 
ters, with a small, envelope-like compartment 
for stamps. These cases are decorated in dif- 
ferent designs worked out in silver or gold, aB 
best pleases the purchaser. 

Edna — "Why do you wear gloves while 
learning to play poker?" Edith — "Because 
Jack told me never to show my hand." 



[A prominent citizen of Los Angeles, swimming ;it Redondo, was guilty 
of the following effect of the Muse's influence shortly after a thrilling 
incident of the sea concerning three young society women:) 



Come hither, rash young swimmers, and stand beside my chair. 

While I tell you of Redondo, and some things that happened there 

On the first day of this August. — now all must gather near. 

It is gruesome in the telling, and I want you all to hear. 

The day was of the loveliest, as Redondo's mostly are. 

The sea was blue and rolling, and spray splashed from afar. 

The matrons and the patrons we'e on the sands at rest, 

When down trooped the young bathers in gay regalia dressed. 

Now yestere'en at low tide a stalwart yoeman bold 

Had hied him with his rowboat. and done as he was told: 

A raft he towed out with him, then viewed the seascape o'er. 

And dropping anchor moored it a half a mile from ehore, 

Now when these gay young swimmers cast eyes upon this raft. 

They danced a two-step nimbly, and then they mostly laughed. 

A goal for rest and prattle, so safe, so far from shore, 

Was just what they'd been wanting, what should they think of more? 

Three blithe young maids of promise, as promises now go, 

Were in the van of 'venturers who feared not undertow. 

The first in scarlet doublet, the others clad in blue, 

And as Katydid so did Helen of Wells and likewise handsome Sue. 

Their leader soon upon a ridge way over there was seen, 

And Helen following in her wake oped wide her mouth, I ween, 

For the swallowed more than doctors say is good for stomach or brain, 

Yet she struggled on right pluckily the distant raft to gain. 

But now both of the other nymphs were on the rafts at rest. 

Thinking that of all their swims this was the very best; 

When suddenly a cry was heard, the raft gave one big lurch, 

And watchers from the shore sould see that Sue had left her perch. 

The moments when one's swimming with all one's might and strength 

Seem inverse to the distance gained and of unending length; 

But when a dear companion is struggling in the deep, 

'Tis time for instant action, and not the place to weep. 



The little maid in scarlet, with comprehending glance, 

Saw she was needed also, perhaps the only chance. 

Unheeding risk of danger she plunged into the sea. 

And with strong strokes of her good arms, behold! the two are three. 

Then carefully and tenderly, discreet beyond their years, 

Lending oach a shoulder, dispelled their comrade's fears: 

Towed her to that haven, "Sweet" raft of moments ago, 

Thinking as they struggled, "Our motion's beastly slow." 

A feeling of fecurity is soon apt to give birth 

To the conundrum habit and othor kindred mirth: 

And one with thoughts deep-seated, reverting to sputter and cough. 

Naively propounded this one "How do we get off?" 

Soon to tho shore tho one "well read" propelled herself for aid. 

And to the anxious mo hers this is what ohe said: 

"We need a man as usual, but ju9t now need him bad, 

And if he gets us homo for lunch, we'll all be mighty glad." 

Now near by dwolt a rancher man, sowing lawn grass blue. 

And by a strange coincidence he was Sue's father, too. 

To him his wife did speed herself and with a visage grim 

Revealed the sad predicament, and left no peace for him. 

His briar root and pruning hook were swiftly cast aside, 

He swore a vow to save those gir Is whatever should betide. 

Rushed he to his bath house, and doffed his linen fair, 

And in his haste to save those girls did rend hio underwear. 

Now from the bluff he sees them, nor right nor left looks he. 

But sees the great big ocean and the skyline meet the sea. 

An instant's self-communion, thanks for strougth and heart, 

Then a swim in blue old ocean, resolved to do his part. 

Two little girls sat patiently upon that plaintive raft: 

A question asked, a story told, and then one of them laughed: 

Tho other thought of Neptune and of the nasty taste 

Of ocean water taken when she was open-faced. 

But at the time for leaving she was brave as brave could be. 

Without the slightest hesitation she slipped into the sea, 

And swimming on right cheerily, the rancher mm and Sue 

Brought little Helen of the Wells back to tho shore— and you. 



6 



Western Graphic 




To thk Pboi kssion. — A special feature of the We tern 
Graphic is ils Department of Musi? and Art, which is in charge 
of an experienced and careful editor. Professional news 
notices, announcements, personals and short criticisms of merit 
are solicited and will he published free. All communications 
should l>e sent in by Thursday morning to insure publication 
the following Saturday, addressed to the Editor of Western 
G aphic, las Angeles. 

FOR several months there has been hard at 
work rehearsing an organization which will 
shortly make its bow to the music loving pub- 
lic as ihe California Ladies' Quartette. It is 
composed of three young ladies and that cap- 
able and thorough pianist, Madame Jeanette 
Webster Crawford, who is also director of the 
quartette. Madame Crawford has not been 
one of the local musical colony so very long, 
but comes with most flattering adieus from the 
critics of Boston, where she was well known as 
the organizer and director of the Agnes Zim- 
merman Quartette. Miss Eloise Lemon, vio- 
linist of the new quartette, comes frrm Chi- 
cago and is a pupil of William Lewis of that 
city, who also taught Maud Powell. Miss 
Lavelle Knox plays the viola and is said to 
be the best in California on that instrument. 
Miss Sarah A. Simons is a pupil of Herr Bier- 
lich on the violoncello; she has a broad tone 
and plays with rich coloring. Madame Craw- 
ford needs no encomiums as a pianist, and 
under her musicianly care the artistic success 
of the organization is certain. Under the 
management of Mr. Willis Ames the quartette 
will tour the principal coast cities and by an- 
other season will possibly go east. 

Among the treats for musicians next 
season will be at least two recitals by Pade- 
rewski, who will be here probably in March. 

Musical Courier: From Los Angeles comes 
the gratifying report of Genevra Johnstone 
Bishop's success as a teacher. She has been 
made much of in society and in the musical 
life of the city, and is proving the most im- 
portant addition the city has received for sev- 
eral years. The climatic conditions are 
wonderfully beneficial, and Mrs. Bishop's 
voice is in its prime. All which is good 
to hear. No more deservedly popular artist 
than Genevra Johnstone Bishop ever lived in 
Chicago, and many are the friends regretting 
that it will be many months before she again 
lives in the city in which for years she has 
made her home. 

This from a Harper publication: "Uncle 
Reuben had just returned from New York, 
and his mind was a confusion of cinemato- 
graphs, self-playing pianos, automobiles, pho- 
nographs, etc. When he was asked which 
had impressed him the most, he solemnly re- 
plied: 

" 'By gosh, the horseless piano beats 'em 
all.'" 

Mr. Francis Lewis Hord will give a morn- 
ing musicale some time in September. A 
unique evening musicale will be given by Mrs. 
Hord and by Mr, James Franklyn Cook some 
evening early in October. The date of these 
enjoyable'events will be announced later. 

Mozart's minuet in E flat has been played 
by request at Hotel Arcadia, Santa Monica, 
this summer no less than seventeen times. 
This is more favor than any other composi- 
tion has received and is certainly a tribute to 



the wearing qualities of this famous com- 
poser's music. 

Mrs. Russell, who has been studying vocal 
music with Mme. Genevra Johnstone-Bishop 
in Los Angeles is stopping at Hotel Arcadia 
for a short time. 

Miss Grace Longley and Mr. E. Templar 
Allen gave a delightful musical program in 
the music room of Hotel Arcadia on Thurs- 
day evening August 17. The affair was quite 
a successful one and was attended by a good 
and enthusiastic audience. 

A party consisting of Miss Myrtle Canady, 
violinist; Miss Helen Chevelier, vocalist; Mrs. 
DeSilva, vocalist; Master George DeSilva, 
vocalist and dancer, and Mr. Briggs. imper- 
sonator, went over to Whittier on Friday 
evening, August 11, and gave a very delight- 
ful entertainment which met the hearty ap- 
preciation of a good audience present to listen 
to the visiting talent. 

Cues 

Admirers of Blanch Bates, who have been 
anticipating seeing her with the Frawley com- 
pany when they come to the Burbank, will be 
disappointed to learn that the fair actress 
leaves for Honolulu shortly. Anyway it is 
only a vague idea that the Frawleys are com- 
ing to the Main street theater and no one 
seems to have any authority for the statement. 

The Los Angeles theater was to have played 
"The Brownies" next week, but after they had 
cancelled two contracts Manager Wyatt con- 
cluded he didn't care very much anyway, so 
has h'ed himself to his South Pasadena cha- 
teau, from which eyrie he reads of the trou- 
bles and chuckles at each fresh rumpus among 
the members of the Italian Opera company. 
After his experience with the foreigners he 
says he feels competent to run a bull fight, a 
Chinese lottery and an insane asylum all at 
once. 

The probabilities are that Madame Modjeska 
and company will be the next attraction at 
the Los Angeles. They are now re-hearsing 
in Manager Fisher's Opera House in San Di- 
ego, and a glance at the following list of sup- 
porting members leads us to expect some fine 
productions: John E. Kellerd, Frederick 
Mosely, George E. Spenser, Wadsworth Harris, 
Lynn Pratt, Cassius Trumbly, Irving Brooks, 
Percey Winter, Mark Fenton, Alfred Bradley, 
Thomas Reiley, Irving Goodrich, M. Coyne, 
Kate Dalglish, Mary Hary Hall, Mary Gard- 
iner, Mrs. Seargent, Guelma Baker, Hattie 
Buskirk and Emma Buskirk. 

On dit, Madame Modjeska is almost as clev- 
er a painter as she is an actress. All of the 
sketches of costumes and scenes of her new 
play, Marie Antoinette, were drawn and 
painted by herself and they are not daubs but 
really finished pictures, showing that the fa- 
mous Polish actress could earn a reputation 
with her brush if she chose. The production 
of the new play will be elaborate to a degree, 
and as Mojeska is practically attending to all 
the designs herself, it should be a faithful his- 
tory in every detail. John C. Fisher, her man- 
ager, is elated over the progress being made 
and is sparing no expense to make the produc- 
tion a notable one. 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MME. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTON E-B I S H O P 

CONCERT and ORATORIO SOLOIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

Pupil: Madame Anna de La (J range, Paris; Signor Bandagger, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio — Blanch a rd Mi sic and Art Building 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modini-Wood 

007 figueroa street. 



FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 

'230 HE1.LMAN BLOCK 



THOMAS W. WILDE 

PIANO, O KUAN and HARMONY 

OR<;anist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
Residence anh Studio 6>1 West 17th 



MRS. F. RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
and SOI.O TI4NISTE 

References: 

Bliiuchard Piano Co., L. A. 614 South Main Street, 
Edward ."chirner, Berlin 

If oritz Moszkowski, Paris Los Angeles, Cal. 



J. BOND FRANCISCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
and TEACHER 

Pupil of 

Emanuel Wirth, Berlin 
Benno Walter, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 

Studio— 

BUNCH ARD BUILDING 



MISS ANNIE LOUISE MARTIN 

TEACHER OF UIANO-rORTE MUSIC 

Pupil of J. H. Hahn, Director Detroit, Mich., Conservatory of 
Music: and of II. C. Post, (iraDd Rapids, Mich. 

Reference, Fitzgerald Piano Co. 
Home Studio, 433 W. Ninth St. 

Lcs ADgeles, Cal. PIANIST and ACCOMPANIST 

"jUg 1 ' "HipM R S. W. B. CLAPP 

" ^ — ^ TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 



Concert, Choir and Oralorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 



FRANCES LEWIS HORD 

. . . VOICE . . . 

STUDIO. 300 Bl.ANCHARP Building 
MRS. JAME3 FRANKLYN COOK, SOLO PIANIST 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons 

Reception each Monday eveDing 

M I S S IvTyrTt LE CANADY 

CONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening F.ngagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and ccmcetrs accepted. 

At Studio SPITE 310 HLANl HARD BUILDING Wednesday 
Residence— Thursdav, Saturday, forenoons. 

California Hotel, cor 2d and Hill. Phone M 1184 



FRED. A. BACON 

TEACHER OK VOICE CULTURE 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday 
SUITE 31.H&319 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



FRANKLIN CAMPBELL 

VOICE CULTURE 
I'm I- Dalian Method 

At Studio, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

315 BLANCHARD BUILDING 



MARY BELLE DAILY 

Solo Soprano of First Christian Church 
VOICE CULTUKE 
Formerly Soprano with the Heywood Concert Co. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Studio, 315 BLANCHARD Building 



ROLLA E. GARDNER 

IIANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Studio, 230% South Spring St 

M I S S M . ~C~. PEARSON 

VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal culture, piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 1922 S. GRAND AVE. 



M. S. AREVALO 

GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progresa 
Also Voice Culture 
Studio, 128 Wilson Block, cor. Spring and FirBt Streets 



EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STIDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Vacation at Chicago. Return about August loth 



EDWARD SIERRA 

OF MEXICO CONSERVATORY 

Private Lessons in 

Piano, Mandolin and Violin 204 WILSON BLOCK 



Western Graphic 




Photo by Schumacher 



MIriS MAR'.AkKT WINSTON 



American Eng. <'o. 



In the Gay Life 

C A OLF is golf, a fad, fashionable and all 
f that, and yet to the majority, traveling 
over ninety and nine miles of sand, chasing a 
small ball into holes is not the most thrilling 
excitement in the world. Walking, of course, 
is good exercise — that is when some one else 
is doing it. Therefore everybody does not do 
golf. Watching the game is likewise not very 
great sport. Figures vanishing in the dim dis- 
tance may look well in the landscape but do 
net furnish much entertainment for the spec- 
tator seated at the starting point. Hence, 
while golf in general may be all absorbing yet 
to the few in particular with the "strength of 
mind" aforesaid the old Scottish game would 
seem to be best at home in its native heath 
where walking miles and miles in a good 
bracing air would be something like exercise. 
But everybody to their taste. 

Now to some minds there is nothing more 
pleasantly and ideally lazy, therefore happy, 
than the old English tennis court with the 
men to do most of the "running" and the 
ladies to sit somewhere in the shaddy back- 
ground drinking tea. Fancy the coziness, the 
rugs, the tea-table and all that — and the other 
table for the gentlemen — soda water table you 
know. This is not an innuendo especially 
when the disclosure is made that a tennis 
court after one's own heart, whatever that 
may mean, is to be started in the west end 
very shortly. In fact the grounds have been 
selected in the Harper Tract and just next 
the Carpenter home on Twenty-eighth street. 
Mrs. Wilshire, Mrs. Childs, Mrs. Miner, Mrs. 
Parker and a number of the young people are 



the prime movers in furthering the happy 
thought, and with this leadership it goes 
without saying society will have another im- 
petus in the way of swell amusements. 

One of the most charming piece of news 
of the season is the announcement at Santa 
Monica this week of the engagement of Miss 
Margaret Winston to Mr. W. C. Woodard. It 
is truly an event and will stir the gay set ex- 
ceedingly. 

Mr. William S. Creighton is a familiar 
figure on the streets these days and is looking 
very well and businesslike since his trip north. 
He says he does not like Sacramento and is 
glad to be back here again. Just at present 
he is holding an official position with Judge 
Trask, one just recently vacated by Mr. Deer- 
ing. In fact what with an armful of note 
books and a happy smile Mr. Creighton looks 
as if he were right in it. Mr. Creighton is 
very much the type of the English country 
gentlemen and he and his little family live an 
ideally secluded life such as President Cleve- 
land and his wife get the precedent for. Mrs. 
Creighton was quite a f-ociety girl before her 
marriage, but now that she has one or two 
chicks to look after has settled down to the 
loveliest kind of home life. They are now oc- 
cupying their cottage at Long Beach. Mr. 
Creighton will go down the end of the week to 
spend his vacation while Judge Trask goes to 
Maine for his. 

Mr. Akin, with Mrs. Akin, is thinking of 
taking a good long vacation east about the 
first of September to his old home in Chicago. 

Mr. Grove Warner of Syracuse, N. Y , is 
out here on a visit and is putting in his lime 
between Pasadena and this, that is to say the 
Van Nuys. Mr. Warner is all sorts of a 
"catch," and has the entree to the best society 
hereabouts. 

It seems odd that none of the young 
people of society here have been participating 



in the tennis tournament at Santa Monica. 
The Misses Donnell of (iarvanza are the 
nearest home and of those, not young people, 
Mrs. James Hendricks is the only familiar 
name from this vicinity. Perhaps the old 
time players are getting back for a time. 

The Catalina golf tournament brought out 
very brilliantly a Los Angeles society maid, 
Miss Gertrude McCrea, who was first in tin- 
ladies' driving, 115 yards, and second in the 
gross score, 104. Miss McCrea has always 
rather leaned toward outdoor accomplish- 
ments, a circumstance which has given her 
a very decided drawing room ease and a repu- 
tation as the finest dancer among the younger 
set in society. Miss McCrea is besides a good 
horseman and takes her place at the seashore 
among the most daring and accomplished 
divers and all that goes with that aquatic 
diversion, all of which illustrates that the 
nineteenth century maid is wise in her gener- 
ation of selecting those pastimes that enhance 
her graces in drawing room or ball room. 

Among the numerous attractive society 
maids at Santa Monica just now may be seen 
Miss Shankland and Miss Edith Wolfskill, 
although Miss Wolfskill rather scorns the 
term "society." While she vows she finds no 
entertainment in so-called social doings, hav- 
ing given her time and interest L>r Bome 
years to art in this country and Paris, yet her 
many friends rejoice to find her still among 
them. The tea given by Miss Henshaw, 
niece of General Sargent, which was con- 
sidered one of the leading affairs of the sea- 
son, found her a guest. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis went from 
Redondo on Thursday last to Santa Monica 
for a short visit and to attend the tennis ball 
which takes place at the Casino this evening. 

Among those who leave here tomorrow to 
be present in San Francisco upon the return 
of the California soldiers areCaptian and Mrs. 
Thorn and Major B. C. Truman and Mrs. and 
Miss Truman. Captain and Mrs. Thom have 
two boys with Steere's battery. 

Mrs. Willoughby Cole haR recently moved 
to her residence, No. 204 North Gates street, 
where she will be at home to her friends on 
Wednesdays. 

Mrs. C. A. Sumner has had as her guests 
at her charming home, Rudder Grange, Term- 
inal Island, the past week, Mrs. Cecil Sumner 
and Miss Margaret Sumner. 

Miss Jette Thom has had as her guests 
during tennis week the Misses Clark, Allen, 
Stephens, Mason, and Mrs. Hill of Chicago. 
Miss Keating entertained Miss Fanny Coul- 
ter and Miss Harriet Severance.* Miss Beebe 
Coulter was a guest of the Arcadia. 

Mr. T. E. Gibbon has gone to St. Louis 
and kindred points for a two weeks' trip. 

Miss Helen Fairchild is the guest at Ter- 
minal Island of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hines. 

Miss Ivy Schoder, a Los Angeles society 
bud of a year ago, has had her usual outing 
at Catalina, with the chaperonage of Mrs. 
Richard Mercer. 

Miss Edith Furrey is being entertained by 
Miss Edith Bicknell at Santa Monica. 



M 


1 s 


C E L L A 


N 


E 0 U 


s 


A. 


M 


E D E 


L 


M A 


X 






ARCHITECT 










Removed to ltl.AN'i 1 1 A K l> Ml SIC 


HAM. HI 1 1.1 UN' ; 




I.os Allude*. 


(nl. 


T 


•Icjihoiie, Ked 


1341 


G. 


A. 


D 0 B I 


N 


S 0 


N 






DRAM ITIC l it \ IN 


I IfG 










voice hm.i i'n rsic \ b < 


1 I,T| l!K 




Stud 


(0 Mt S 


irano Apply by letter oi 


1) Uv 


■en In hi i - of 10- 


2M 



yyyyyy«vy««««««»*«««««v««yy««»yyyi( 

* * 

* What is the difference between A GREAT * 
*J ARTIST'S voice and that of another singer' J 



* QUALITY * 

* * 

* What is the dillerence between the tone of the * 

I HflRDMflN PIANO \ 

9 and that of another make of instruments ? * 
5 QUALITY =50.000 I IN USE * 

* sou-: AHI.NTS * 

J LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY * 

j> Phone Green 1444 313 S. Broadway. * 

* * 



8 



Western Graphic 




Down the Line 

CODE Commissioner George Denis (sitting 
at desk, brow wrinkled in deep thought; 
properties, a bag full of golf sticks, letters 
of advice from Jo Sartori, R. H. H. Chap- 
man, Jo Cook, Ed Silent, Judge Morro, Major 
Norton, W. J. Nevin, J. J. 
A Possibility of Byrne, et al, and a round 
Code Revision robin from the Green Com- 
mittee). "I see I will have to 
add a whole section to this penal code. Now 
these blooming legislators have not prescribed 
any penalty for a man who sclaffs when loft- 
ing at a bunker. That ought to mean thirty 
days or thirty dollars, with added time and 
amount for such awful language as Ed Silent 
uses. How about Ed's case? I must put 
something in to check him. He never takes 
the right stance, and his great fault is in not 
replacing his divots. For every divot left out, 
a high ball for the crowd; that will fetch him. 
And Jo Cook, he is always kicking at the 
whins; that must have a punishment to fit 
the crime. That reminds me when Nevin 
foozles, he always conceals his thoughts; that 
deserves a heavy fine. I don't approve of 
using spoons, either; that fellow Maude will 
UBe them, just as if there were not spoons 
enough at a restaurant, or any old place. 
What is this? A letter from the Amalga- 
mated Golf Players' Union? Um-um-um, — 
'we demand that you place a law in the penal 
code making it a felony for any business man 
to give more than two hours a day time to 
his affairs other than golf playing. This is 
necessary to protect the downtrodden golfites 
from the requirements of an unsympathizing 
world.' Certainly, that shall be done; it is 
no more than right. By the way, I believe I 
will consult Henry on the plan to have all 
senatorial deadlocks hereafter decided by a 
golf match between the candidates." 

"Say, I have got a kick coming, said Jack 
Bushnell yesterday. This Captain Cressy 

thinks that there is a hoodoo 
Jack Bushnell microbe about the Columbia 
and the Hoodoo Club, and he won't allow any 
Microbe meetings to be called there. 

The microbe he 
says is of the eighth dimension 
and he thinks it will ravage the 
entire political body of the city 
if it is given any chance. Tell 
you what, I think I will call the 
next meeting at the crematory. 
If I had only been inoculated 
six months ago I might have 
been adjutant general instead 
of Receiver in Chief of Gold 
Bricks." 



J. A. MUIR. ON THE LKKT 

not share 



The talk about legal opposi- 
tion to Judge Fitzgerald's taking 
his seat as a superior court judge. 

I am told on ex- 
The Opposition cellent author- 
Said to Have ity, had little or 
Petered no basis, and 

has petered out I 
entirely now. The fact is that 
Attorney General Ford could 
not be expected to lend his assistance to any 
such scheme, and without his consent no writ 
could be asked for from the supreme or any 
other court. From what gossip I have heard 




JACK BUSHNELL 



I think the talk originated with some over 
zealous friends of Judge M. T. Allen who 
considered that Fitzgerald's appointment 
would imperil that gentleman's chances of 
renomination. Judge Allen, of course, had 
nothing to do with such ideas 
for he is too dignified and has 
too nice a sense of honor to 
mix up in any such intrigue. 
It would seem that opposition 
on such an account was ill 
advised, for when it comes to 
convention time all of the 
judges must take their 
chances. There are six judges 
to be nominated, and how it 
could be argued that Fitz- 
gerald's presence would mili- 
tate against any of the other 
five is not plain. Judge Fitz- 
gerald is glad to get back, we 
are all glad to have him back, 
and added satisfaction is to 
be had that his home coming 
is not to be marred by any 
unseemly exhibition of pique, 
or worse, by the very few who do 
the sentiments of the many, — that he is a 
jolly good fellow and a very Bayard of a 
judge. 

Corney Pendleton is back from the north, 
and though he has got out his pirate hat, in 
breadth of brim and rakishness of cut a very 
Captain Kiddish affair, he 
No Sacramento has no disappointment rank- 
er Corney ling in his heart. He would 
like to have been made secre- 
tary of the code commission, but if he had 
taken it he would have had to live in Sacra- 
mento — and that was too much for Corney. 
He has found that city a very lively and 
interesting place at intervals, but a steady 
residence there was not a prospect to charm, 
so he cheerfully gave up wearing out his shoes 
going to the postoffice for the commission 
that never came, and has gone to work at his 
law practice. He can be heard occasionally 
singing that Sacramento refrain, invented, I 
believe, by Ned Hamilton: 

"Hail! hail! The secretary's appointed, 
"What the hades do we care now?'' 

As a lilter Corney is a great 
success. 

No, my dear sir, you need 
not alarm yourself. Johnny 
Muir and Tommy Gibbon will 
not go to Tia 
In Answer Juana and shoot 
to Anxious bullets through 
Inquirer each other's liv- 

ers, or stick rap- 
piers under each other's fifth 
ribs. They are both too sensible 
and too good fellows for any 
such foolery. Yes, it was a close 
call for a time, there in the 
supervisors' room. Johnny felt his 
muscles strenuously twitching, 
and Tommy had his good right 
hand on a five-pound inkstand, 
ready for the fray, for he is 
something of an editor and can 
sling ink with the best of us. 
But it has all passed like a summer cloud, or 
love, or a political promise, or like any other 
nothingness. When Johnny gets into the pilot 
house of his ferry boat from San Pedro to 




Terminal Island the chances are that you 
will see Tommy climb up on top of the 
hurricane deck and share a ball of popcorn 
with his antagonist, and when the Terminal 
has its through line to Salt Lake the Carmelo 
will be the first private car 
to make the trip. 



I think if it came to a 
show down that Muir could 
and would put up what the 
Athletic Club 
Muir Could men would 
Scrap Well call a very 
pretty scrap. 
I remember a number of years 
ago, when he first came here 
and I was reporting the rail- 
ways, going to his office one 
day. As I went in Muir was 
walking up and down the 
floor, rather red in the face, 
and breathing a bit hard. 
"What's the matter?" I asked. 
"Oh, nothing at all, nothing 
at all," he answered. But he 
kept walking and puffing and showed signs of 
perturbation. "What in the world is wrong 
with you?" I asked again, — and persisting, at 
last he broke out, "Why, nothing is wrong at 
all. A big loafer of a fellow thought he could 
be impertinent to me, and I picked him up 
and threw him out. Now I am mad because 
I did not follow him down stairs and punch 
him." I afterwards found out that the man 
who had gone down stairs in a hurry weighed 
twenty pounds or more than Muir, and had 
the reputation of being a bad man from Ari- 
zona. Muir as a rule, however, is one of the 
sweetest tempered and most amiable men I 
ever met and one, moreover, who has the most 
charming personality throughout. 

Capt. Allan Kelly has gone down into 
Sonora, where the Vaquis have recently "up- 
riz," for the purpose of giving the news of 
the trouble to a syndicate of 
Off for the American newspapers. It's a 
Yaqui War safe bet that Kelly gets the 
news to send to his papers. 
The "Manana" business will never go with 
him. It will be "al instante" with him, and 
the sleepy Mexicans will find that fact out 

"muy pronto " 
Kelly is the very 
essence of the 
get-there Amer- 
ican newspaper 
man. He evi- 
dently expects 
trouble for he 
went armed to 
the teeth— with 
double -action 
rapid - fire ko- 
daks and plenty 
of ammunition 
in the shape of 
films. Mr. Kelly 
has been identi- 
fied with the al- 
ways exciting, 
and sometimes 

deadly, journal- 
allan KELLY j 8m 0 f tne wegt 

for years. In the stirring days of the Corn- 
stock he showed up in Virginia City one day 
and told the editor of the Enterprise he 
wanted a job at reporting. He was several 
sizes smaller than the reporters the Enter- 




Western Graphic 



prise editor was in the habit of employing in 
those days, but something about the look of 
his eye and the set of his jaw convinced the 
editor that he would do, and so he was put to 
work. 

"You'll take that desk over there by the 
door," said the editor, "I'm going out for a 
few minutes, and you may stay and entertain 
any visitors that drop in. Look at their 
specimens and give them a writeup if they 
look all right." 

The editor started down the stairs but 
came back presently. "I forgot to tell you," 
he said, "that the city marshal is looking for 
me; he doesn't like the way I've been writing 
him up. He's liable to drop in any time. 
Don't let him get to the top of the stairs. 
Have your weapon handy and drop him as 
soon as his head appears over the railing." 
With these few remarks the editor turned to 
go again. 

"But how will I know him?" exclaimed 
Mr. Kelly. "I'm a new man here and I've 
never met the marshal." 

"Oh, you'll know him; he's a dark com- 
plected cuss, with whiskers. Plug him before 
he reaches the landing or he may plug you." 
The editor then left. 



The Kissing 
Bug Again 



Foitunately no dark complexioned man 
came to call on the editor that afternoon, and 
the next day Kelly was put on another detail. 

It has remained for a local newspaperman 
to puncture the erroneous impression that the 
kissing bug devotes his attentions exclusively 
to lovely maidens with rosy 
lips and peachy cheeks and 
limpid eyes, and such like se- 
ductive and entrancing things. 
Al Searles of the Express staff of intel- 
lectual athletes was kissed by the local kissing 
bug early last week. Rodman, of that ilk, 
did Searles' work for him for four days, and 
then Searles showed up again, sans mus- 
tache, and said that he had been having a 
carbuncle on his lip. 

A likely yarn. As if a carbuncle would 
be apt to come on a newspaper man's lip or 
cheek! 

However, Searles persisted in the prevari- 
cation and did it so energetically and vehe- 
mently that suspicion was aroused and an 
investigation started, when the facts were 
quickly brought out. 

It seems that the bug was out on Wash- 
ington street, having been misinformed to the 
effect that Otheman Stevens and Dishman, of 
the Times, had lived out that way. It was 
along about dusk and Searles happened 
along. The bug was in a hurry to get back 
down town and the heavy pepper trees along 
there made it quite dark, anyhow, and the 
first thing Searles knew — 

He has decided to let the mustache grow 
out again. 

Yes, her hat was certainly lovely, though 
it had cost but eighteen dollars and thirteen 
cents; quite as lovely as that Smith woman's 
which had cost nearly a hundred. " But the 
Smiths are able to own a more conspicuous 
pew in church than we are," faltered her hus- 
band. " Well, they can't come in any later 
than we can," she exclaimed radiantly. — De- 
troit Journal. 



"You are quite run down," said the face- 
tious cyclist to the man he had knocked over; 
"you ought to take something." "I will," 
said his victim jumping up; "I'll take your 
name and address." — Pick-Me Up. 




mbevc Cool freezes Blow 




SANTA MONICA 

TENNIS is the thing this week. The pre- 
vailing excitement is like fleas — no one 
escapes, and from the Casino courts to the 
boulevard on the bluff, and from the beach 
to the Arcadia, the talk is of tennis — the 
players and the championship games. The 
interest in the annual tournament of the 
Southern California Lawn Tennis Association 
is unusually great, especially considering the 
popularity of the new king of games in the 
fashionable set, golf. It is suggested to call 
golf the king and tennis the queen, and polo 
is in the balance between ace and ten-spot. 
Of course the knave must be skipped. From 
the number of entries it is probable the play 
will continue through Saturday. 

There is not onlv fashionable enthusiasm 




Rile Photo 



A .TOLLY SUNDAY GIRL 



in the tournament but the development of new 
players and the brilliant and fast play is 
making some of the old wheel horses young 
again. 

Despite the foggy mornings and cool 
weather in the interior Santa Monica is 
having a fair seaBon, and on Sundays 
especially every accommodation is tested 
to its capacity by the big crowds that 
flock in on every train and car from early 
morning till after dark. The electric cars 
come loaded to the guards, and it seems lots 
of people appreciate the convenience of that 
road. 

A reception and banquet were given on 
Monday evening at Hotel Arcadia to the Se- 
same Club of Los Angeles by Mrs. Dr. David- 
son. She was assisted in receiving in the 
"Sala del Mar" by Miss Rose Hardenburg. 
Later on at about 7 p. m. the party adjourned 
to the glass annex of the grill room where 
covers were laid for over thirty people, and it 
was after nine o'clock before the company 
arose from the sumptuously spread board. 

CATALINA 

A CURSORY reading of the prints lately 
would lead a stranger to think we were 
having some regular old Captain Kid times. 



I Hotel flrcaflia 




"A low, rakish craft was seen approaching 
the coast. There was a great bustle on board, 
which was probably the only thing the last 
female passenger could not throw overboard. 

SANTA MONICA 

SANTA MONICA 
CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 
Koom 
I The Dining 

Room 
I The Parlors 
1 All Look 
Toward tha Sea 

It seems to me T'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles Mow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound, 
And I'd have stillness all mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 1 
Where surges roll aud wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's sur«ly where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
But when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lots the best. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
Anil get out where the sky is blue, 
And say, now, how does this seem to you? 

—Eugene Field, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
competing resorts combined 



Frank A. 

"Prop. 



Miller 



S 




• SO. Cell. 10th Annual Races • 

• Polo Club Se Pt 8 & 9, i«9Q • 

• OCEAN PARK, SANTA MONICA • 

• • 

• COMMITTEE— W. H. Young, I. H. Dudley, Wilbur Par- • 

• ker, J. B. Procter, M. G. Burmester, G. L. Waring. • 



• Eight Running Races, distances from % mile m 

• and repeat to 1 mile. Entries close Aug. 3 1st. • 

• For particulars apply to • 

• Q. L. WARING, Santa Honica » 

• • 



Fine Fish 
Dinners 



AVi No tourist considers a visit to California .X. 

JW complete until he has visited Baata Monica and WW 

AVi no one seeking a Summer Kesort thinks of over- ^K. 

ilW looking Santa Monica. For far and wide has ex- WW 

SR. tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, 

\(W mussels cockles, lobsters, etc., which are to be WW 

SK, obtained at the famous restaurant, overlooking .aT 

\IW the ocean. WW 

| THE PAVILION X 

•hp KCKERT & HOPF, Props. ^jjp 

I The North Beach t 
I Bath House * 

Has perfected an arrangement by -jj 

ft which the water in the plunge will he entirely <u 

l> changed daily. This year a great deal of money w 

has been put into permanent improvements in sj 

|\ and around the bath house, and it will be the v i, 

P aim of the management to cater to the best class W 

t of people, by providing everything for their 3» 

P comfort and convenience. We may say to our <u 

J> old patrons that they will hardly recognize the w 
1 place on account of changes for the better. 



10 



Western Graphic 



The dark-visaged pirates were armed to the 
teeth, some of them even having their teeth 
tied on. There was Kemp, the leader, and 
other determined leaders with un-Kemped 
hair and flaming eyes. Recklessly the in- 
vaders steered their boat straight for our 
peaceful shores and as the keel grated on the 
pebbly beach the bloodthirsty or beer- thirsty 
rascals jumped from the vessel and grappled 
with the Prince of the Island Kingdom, who 
had come in person to repel the attack of the 
outlaws from the country across the channel. 
There was a short, sharp conflict; one man 
called another a liar, there was a splash, and 
two of the opposing warriors were rolling in 
the drink, struggling in the throes of a sud- 
den chill. It was seen that the attacking 
party was too strong for the little band of 
patriots so the entire reserve force of one con- 
stable was summoned to place the leader of 
the ruffians in the castle dungeon. And they 
will all live happy ever after." 

1 read in some yellow paper that there 
is a great Fcarcity of fish all up and down 
the coast. Whereat I smile. For on one day 
the end of last week the record of the season 
was broken by four gentlemen who went down 
to the isthmus, and returned in the evening 
with sixty-seven yellowtail and fifty-three 
barracuda, whitefish and bass. Send over 
any of your fish-hungry population and we 
will make them think they have turned into 
fish if they wish. 

Tuesday the Hermosa made her annual 
excursion from Newport beach, bringing 
some four hundred visitors from that vicinity. 
They had the Santa Ana band with them and 
seemed to be getting their money's worth of 
the pleasures of life. 

CORONADO 

AN "ELDERLY eastern visitor stood look- 
ing across the ocean the other day, very 
intently. Finally the old lady took off her 
specks, as though she had completed the siz- 
ing up of the ocean's measurement and asked, 
turning to a near-by sightseer: "It must be a 
mile across to that point there, don't you 
think so?" Of course the on looker thought 
it was. "Shouldn't be surprised if it was as 
much as eight miles, should you?" presently 
queried the questioner. "Shouldn't be sur- 
prised if it were, madame," responded the 
man. After a moment's reflection the old 
lady exclaimed: "This is the first time I have 
seen the ocean, and, oh dear, its so nice to see 
enough of something and know that no rich 
men have got a trust on it either." 

It is a much to be lamented fact that east- 
erners and even westeners, even of Colorado, 
do not understand the climate of Southern 
California any better than they do. A recent 
arrival, a prominent business man of Denver, 
says he was warned by dozens of his friends to 
fight shy of Southern California if he was not 
anxious to be roasted to a dark brown while 
yet alive. Voiced in different phases, they all 
wanted to know why he and his family didn't 
go somewhere and get boiled up in a hurry so 
as to get the agony over. But the gentleman 
had been this way before and stuck to the 
original plan. He considers that if his people 
really knew the pleasures of life in misquoted 
Southern California, thousands would be here 
not only for winters but summers also. Here's 
a chance to enlighten the blind by literature 
concerning the country we love. 

Mrs. A. P. Johnson of Riverside, accom- 
panied by their charming daughter and son, 
are spending August at Hotel Coronado. 



The Coronado botanical gardens and floral 
decoration and adornment of the interior of 
Hotel del Coronado will hereafter be in charge 
of Miss Kate O. Sessions of San Diego, one of 
the most successful and artistic florists and 
landscape gardeners in Southern California. 
Miss Sessions will make a specialty of the 
growth of carnations. 

The impromptu musicals given occasion- 
ally by Mrs. Alfred Abbey of San Francisco, 
during her stay at the hotel, are thoroughly 
enjoyed by the music-loving guests, who are 
many. 

The recent trip on the "May" with Capt. 
Dunne in charge, made by J. V. G. Posey, 0. 
W. Posey and William Bayly, Jr., of Los 
Angeles, from Coronado to Catalina, Terminal 
and return was thoroughly enjoyed by the 
young men. They were gone eleven days and 
made the return trip from Catalina in ten 
hour's time. Nine wild goats were captured 
by the men of the "May" at Catalina. Messrs. 
Bayly and Posey entertained delightfully, 
giving two swell parties while at Catalina and 
also two at Terminal. 

Among recent arrivals at Hotel del Coro- 
nado are Mr. and Mr. Louis E. Dreyfus and 
family of Santa Barbara, Mr. William Bayly 
of Los Angeles, Dr. G. T. Hunter of New York 
City, H. B. Henderson of Riverside, M. H. 
French of Los Angeles, N. B. Bridget and S. 
M. Davidson of Washington (D. C), Mr. and 
Mrs. George E. Lincoln of New York, W. J. 
Barrett of Los Angeles, Judson Dalard of 
Philadelphia, J. A. Cameron and wife of Fort 
Williams, Mr. and Mrs. George E. Hensken of 
Stockton, and Denis Newman of London, Eng. 
-Mrs. T. Anderson of Los Angeles, Mr. John 
\V. Edwards of Redlands, Mr. and Mrs. A. P. 
Johnson and the Misses Johnson, Riverside, 
Mrs. Frankenfield, J. B. Alexander, H. E. 
Dibble, H. J. Woollacott, James Woollactt, 
Miss Woollacott of Los Angeles. 

Summer rates at Hotel del Coronado as 
low as $17.50 per week, and $22 includes 
round trip railroad fare, with bus and bag- 
gage from San Diego depot to and from the 
hotel. The cheapest summer outing one can 
take. 

Fuller particulars can be obtained of H. 
F. Norcross, Coronado agent, 200 South 
Spring street. 

REDONDO 

PREPARATIONS are being made for an- 
other open handicap golf tournament 
to be held on the Redondo Country Club 
links the latter part of this month, as the 
guests at Hotel Redondo have exhibited an 
unusual interest in golf this season. In the 
bi-weekly tournament of Saturday last A. W. 
Bumiller and Mrs. F. H. Seymour were the 
winners. 

Tennis matches are held on the Redondo 
courts each Wednesday and Friday afternoon, 
and upon these occasions tea is served, Mrs. 
and Miss Seymour acting as hostesses this 
week. Miss Marie Markham of Pasadena is 
putting up a remarkably strong game of ten- 
nis this season. 

Miss Laura Solano, who broke the ladies' 
golf record on the Redondo links with a score 
of 48 before her departure for the east, has 
been distanced by Mrs. Jean Bowers of Marys- 
ville, Cal., who made a score of 47 one day 
this week. 

The Misses Bumiller who returned to their 
home in Los Angeles Monday after an ex- 
tended stay here came down this week, 
Wednesday, for the golf match play, and 
Miss Edna Bumiller distinguished herself 
with a score of 52. 



SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 

fonta Catalina island 



Three, ami one-half hours from Loi Angelew 

The Greatest Resort 

The liveliest Season of the Year 

Climate near Perfection 

Phenomenal Fishing and Hunting 

The great Stage Bide 

m--™* HOTEL 
AP,0,NT,,hNTS METROPOLE 



luique excl ut*i ve a* tract ions 

The Famed Marine (iartlens aft viewed 

from the glass bottomed hoa h 
The best and most picturesque iiolf Links 
Round trip every day from Los Angelei 
Sunday excursions, three hours on the inland 
See K. B. time tables 

For fell information, illustrated pamphle s and 
rates apply to 



J BANNING CO. 

Tel. M 3b 222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



THE. GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, Galitornia 



Hotel just Completed 
Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Looking Right out on the Ocean 

jJnju Bath house in connec- 
Ratea #1 to »4 a day SSs with hotel. Finest 
Special rates on fH beach and surf bathing on 

application S3| f^-SSi ] l? kS ' ?," cht ; 
K1 SHS nig, tishing. Ten miles of 

SP AllflP.rSOn 1852 tine roadway along beach 
. 1 . /1I1UOIOUII for bicycling. 

Manager c>a>j 



ssWS? j^vvvs^vyvy*: >A^NW^vi; 

1 The Attractive Route 

To the Favorite Sea Side 



Resorts is the.. 



Los Angeles Terminal Railway 




Terminal Island, BytheSea 

Catalina Island San Pedro | 

Long Beach, Are thc favorite and <fi 
most delightful places <}< 
and only ■ short ride from Los Angeles, where can be 
found the finest Open Sea Itathiiig, Yachting and 
Kiahing on the Pacific coast 
Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket Y/ 
M Office, '214 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. K, 
H S. B. Hy.nes, Gen. Mgr. T. C. PECK.Gen.Agt Pass. Dept. & 



mount Eowe Railway 

Magnificent Panorama of Earth and Ocean 
Grandest Trip on Earth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3500 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
wither without baths. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Trafrle ami Excursion Agent 
214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Mala 960 



Western Graphic 



11 



R E DO N D O 



*««««*«««*««*«««*«««««*«**««««*«** 




Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 



Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn 
aments. 



Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort * 

* 
X 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
« 

* 
* 

* 
* 

% H. R. WARNER, Prop. * 

* * 



* 
J* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 



Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 



Transient Hales S3 50t<>«4. 
Special Weekly liateg 



Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4. © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Every day 9.30 am 1.30 p m 5.30 p m 
Sundays 8.10 am 9.30 am 10.45 am 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 7.00 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for Los Angeles 

Everyday 8.00 am 1 1.00 am 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a m 8.00 a m 9.30 a m 
11.00 am 4.15 pm 5.45 pm 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Redondo 6.30 pm 
returning leaves Lob Angeles 11.30 p m 

City Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 

L. J. PERRY, Superintendent 



BUNOY'S 



Hotel, Bath House and J 

Cottnges Lighted by Acety- fi 

leneGas. Only Hotel dl- J* 

rectly at the Springs. Open [J 

all the Year. : : : A 



Elsinore 
Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 



E. Z UNDY, Prop- 
Bates per week— 88, 8'J, and 810, includ 
lng Hot Sulphur Baths. No Con- 
sumptives taken : : : : 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 



Ft 



SGHRflMSBkRG 

...WINES... 



The Host Famous of California 



Light, Delicate Wine?, 



SHH Matured in Underground 

wm " - ■ - i§§ 




PACIFIC COAST A Q C NT ■ 



I Sherwood & Sherwood 

L 



Mrs. C. C. Carpenter entertained at her 
cottage with a ladies' card party Thursday 
afternoon in honor of her guest, Mrs. Benton. 
There were thirty ladies present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Kerckhoff, nurse 
and two children, Mr. and Mrs. \V. T. McFie 
and three children of Los Angeles, and Mr. and 




HARDY BROTHERS STATE CHAMPIONS 
From "Lawn Tennis in Southern California. Coprighted 1X09 
by J. C. Hemingway. 

Mrs. LeRoy Leonard of Pasadena are among 
those arriving this week for the rest of the 
season at Hotel Redondo. 

Dr. A. C. Crofton of Pasadena is again 
spending a short time at the hotel. 

Wm. W. Lovett, T. L. Craig and Robert 
D. Osburn, who with their families are at Re- 
dondo for the season, will take in the golf 
tournament at Monterey next week. 

Los Angelenos at Hotel Redondo this week 
include Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Beswick, Mrs. 
John Pendergast, Calvert Wilson, James B. 
Hobbs, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Lewis, Jr., Mrs. E. 
W. Fleming, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Dinsmore, 
Miss Mabel Dinsmore, C. R Smurr, J. S. Vos- 
burg, A. W. Bumiller, Maj. and Mrs. Ben C. 
Truman, Miss Truman, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. 
McFie, Maynard McFie, Lyman McFie, W. T. 
McFie, Jr., L. C. Easton, Miss Easton, Wm. G. 
Young, Mrs. M. E. Lynch, Mrs. G. C. Lynch 
and daughter, Miss Sinclair, G. C. Lynch, 
Mrs. M. E. Winston, Frederick Carter, Irving 
Crowell and G. T. Bennett. 



TERMINAL ISLAND 

BESIDES the excitement, of a real yacht 

race for money and blood there was 

considerable amusement among Terminal 



Islanders over the jockeying tactics indulged 
in by the respective skippers in last Sunday's 
event. It seems there was a genuine sporty 
feeling between the two captains and both 
stoutly declared they would sail their boats just 
as they stood. But at an opportune time there 
was safely stowed in the cabin of the Osprey 
a water sail that could pull a knot. Captain 
Winters winked his weather eye, and did not 
heave a sigh when, on the morning of the 
race, just before the boats passed the starting 
boat, Captain Peterson of the Nautilus defi- 
antly hoisted a balloon topsail. It looked 
like anybody's race for the first leg of the 
course, but on the return from Long Beach the 
Osprey got close to the wind and won easily. 

The name of Mrs. H. M. Sale as the direc- 
tress of a party or entertainment is an assur- 
ance of success, and as Mrs. Sale rather leans 
toward cake walks it goes without saying 
that the event at the Gordon Arms last Satur- 
day night was the best ever. It was led by 
S. P. Anderson and Mrs. Sale, who received the 
lion's share of the applause. Mr. Anderson 
wore white duck trousers turned over red 
hose, white shoes, a gray Prince Albert lined 
with red, and a stove-pipe hat. The effect was 
set off with a huge pink collar and a large 
pink chrysanthemum. Mrs. Sale wore Nile 
green silk trimmed elaborately with black and 
yellow mulle. Her bonnet was an exact 
counterpart of the bonnet of a noted cake 
walker in the east. Judge Waldo M. York, 
W. J. Hunsaker and H. Jevne occupied the 
delicate positions as judges, and after recall- 
ing five of the couples for a supplemental 
exhibition awarded the cake to T. Maxwell 
and Florence Dodson. 

Tuesday evening the summer home of C. 
B. Boothe was the scene of a jolly informal 
dance ; given as a farewell to the Misses Grace 
Forbes, Mabel Forbes and Sadie Miller, who 
will leave tomorrow for their home in the 
east. 



Not many people will express surprise at 
the reported low-down exhibition Warden 
Aguirre made of himself by his brutal treat- 
ment of a newspaper man who was a guest of 
the San Quentin prison directors on their 
tour of inspection. It must have been that 
the man Aguirre owed the journalist a few 
dollars and felt that at last he was in a posi- 
tion where he could safely carry out some of 
his bluffs he has been known to utilize for 
liquidating bills. 





Loa Angeles 



San Francisco 



Portland 



From "Lawn Tennis In Southern California" 



Copyrighted 1891) by J. 0. Hemingway 



CONGRATULATING THE WINNERS ON THE CASINO COURTS 



12 




Western Graphic 
7 9 



Greater Los Hngeles 

City and County 




IT IS a matter of congratulation that we 
have so nearly pa3?ed the summer with- 
out any serious damage to the fruit industry 
by the drougth. A few weeks ago the pros- 
pect was very gloomy, and in 
Orchards many sections there was im- 

All Right minent danger that the citrus 

trees would die or be badly 
damaged by the lack of moisture. But, thanks 
to the extraordinary amount of fog and the 
energy our orchardists have displayed in giv- 
ing the trees extra cultivation and in search- 
ing for new sources of water, the trees have 
passed the danger point, and now the amount 
of water available is increasing. When it is 
remembered that the sources of water for ir- 
rigation have been growing weaker for the last 
six years, the splendid condition of the fruit 
trees is remarkable. The average annual rain- 
fall since 1894 has been about ten inches, and 
in the years in which, during that period, the 
rainfall approached normal it came in the 
shape of violent storms that carried the water 
to the sea with but little benefit to the crops. 
So it may truthfully be said that we have had 
a continuous run of six years of drouth, 
and in the last two years the precipitation has 
been so small that the amount of water in the 
mountains is now less than ever before known 
since the settlement of the country by Amer- 
icans. Had this occurred twenty years ago 
the damage would have been such as to des- 
troy vegetation and ruin the country. But 
now we are experiencing the beneficial effects 
of our system of irrigation, which has changed 
a condition that naturally would have brought 
dire calamity into one where the fruits of hus- 
bandry are not withheld. Twenty years just 
about covers the life of our oldest orchards 
under irrigation, and it is a splendid record 
that enables us to say that in all that time 
the trees have never been seriously damaged 
from drouth or frost. 

At this time, in the latter part of August, 
within sixty days of the u*ual time for the 
fall rains, every section of Southern California 
has the assurance that the trees will go into 
the new year in good shape, with the proba- 
bility, amounting almost to a certainty, that 
the end of the drouth is at hand. 

The amount of water that has been devel- 
oped during the past two years has been very 
great, and it demonstrates that the subterra- 
nean sources of water lie very deep and con- 
tain vast amounts of water. The water shed 
between the mountains and the ocean is not 
large enough to account for the abundance of 
water tapped by tunnels in the mountains 
and wells on the plains, and gives strength to 
the theory that much of it comes through un- 
der-ground rivers from far-distant mountain 
ranges. 

A careful estimate has been made of the 
amount of water developed in Southern Cali- 
fornia within the past year, and it reveals the 
astonishing fact that nearly 31,000 inches 
have been added to the supply of irrigation 
water. The commercial value of this will be 
seen when it is known that it will sell for an 
average of $500 an inch. On such a valua- 
tion it means an addition of over fifteen mil- 



lion dollars to the wealth of Southern Cali- 
fornia — more than the annual production of 
gold in the entire State. 

An important decision in regard to water 
rights was made by Judge Ballard of Orange 
county last week. The case was that of an 
injunction proceeding which came before him 
by change of venue from the 
An Interesting Superior court of San Diego 
Water Decision county, in which the court 
was asked to restrain the 
City of San Diego from selling $1,500,000 of 
San Diego city bonds, the proceeds of which 
were to be used for establishment of the pro- 
posed new water system for San Diego. The 
purpose of the bond issue was to enable the 
city to carry out a contract with the Southern 
California Mountain Water Company whereby 
the latter company was to supply the city 
with water. The court sustained the injunc- 
tion on the ground that the water company 
did not own the water which it proposed to 
sell. The proceeds of the sale of the bonds 
was to be used to develop the water and in- 
stall a new system of water works for the city. 
The result of the decision will be to prevent 
the city and company from doing the work in 
conjunction, but it is hoped that the company 
may be able to complete the work independ- 
ent of the aid at first contemplated. 

Under the laws of California it requires 
five year's time to perfect a water right, and 
the corpus of water cannot be sold at all. 
Five years use of a water right perfects the 
title, but during this term the right cannot be 
sold, although it has been the custom to sell 
or rather quit-claim, a right before the expira- 
tion of the five years, the new proprietor step- 
ing into the rights of his vendor to appropri- 
ate the water. Under this decision, which 
attorneys say is good law, it seems to be im- 
possible for cities or other municipal corpora- 
tions to purchase inchoate water rights. The 
right to develope and appropriate water is not 
affected but the practice, which has become 
prevalent, to purchase newly-developed sources 
before the expiration of the five years would 
seem to come under the inhibition of the court. 
If public funds cannot be used for such pur- 
poses, it will make it difficult for cities to in- 
stall municipal water systems, and it may 
raise the question whether private water cor- 
porations have the right to use their funds for 
such a purpose. It is to be hoped that the 
decision may not raise a new crop of legal 
technicalities which will deter the investment 
of capital in water properties. 

For mid-August, in mid summer, follow- 
ing a so-called drouth, the business out- 
look has never been better. The facts are 
that the crops sold have brought more money 
th an ever before; the crops to be sold during 
the next month will bring better prices for 
choice goods than in any previous year. The 
banks, and thry are legion, have more money 
than in the history of our city. People gen- 
erally have money and many are disposed to 
husband it awaiting a real rainy day. The 
real genuine producer is full handed and can 
buy almost anything his or his wife's fancy 



• IH12TEL MITDME : 

J u u Seventh and Olive Sts., Los Angeles f 




EUROPEAN PLAN— 60 Rooms 
ELEGANT SUITS Rates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Puss Hie Poors 



Correspondence 

Promptly 

Answered 



l . II. McGONKOAL 

Proprietor 



St, Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding; and Day College for 
Young Men and Boys 

■ •'THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com- 
• mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Cbe Tall term Begins on monday, September 4th 

For further Information, semi for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A. LINN, C. M. 




LADIES * 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Chemist 

**.MPrice 50 cts. 

North Main Street 



7^U>* - 1 ^ Cor. FIRST and 

Cne palace spring sts. 

A Select Family Re ort 

P&trOnlsed by the business men of the eity with 
their families. Elegantly fitted, coed in Summer 
and warm in Winter. The Berth Kamily Orchestra In 
attendance. Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Kestauraiit and Kefi-eshmcii t s 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
Aftei Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 




WARDROBES 



Made of Solid oak ■ 
Golden Finish— Good Values & 



FOLDING BEDS 



I. T. martin, 531-535 So. Spring SI. 

Wheel Chairs sold or rented. 



Western Graphic 



13 



dictates. But as a rule they are frugal. Any 
way it's a good thing to go to the beach or the 
mountains and recuperate and have a rest 
and a good time. September will be our most 
trying month as it always is It's the last of 
a long dry season, possibly extending into 
October. With the first good rain "storm," 
that greatest of stimulants to trade, confidence 
will be restored and business will go with a 
vim. 

In fact there are plenty of long headed 
business men who have studied the Southern 
California situation who claim that with good 
rains the coming season we will have a boom. 
Not one of the '85-7 kind, but a substantial 
one that will bring the greatest good to the 
largest number, start the ball of success and 
prosperity rolling, building up the county and 
city as well. The county needs more good 
fruit growers and first-class farmers, and now 
is the time for them to get a foot hold while 
land is cheap. The city is growing and lots 
of money is waiting for chances to invest, for 
everybody believes in the great future before 
Los Angeles. 

One lungers are both an advantage, and 
we might say, to quote somebody, an "un- 
mixed evil." Many have money to spend for 
the sake of enjoying our matchless climate 
which surely brings relief if not a cure when 
taken in time. The other is the impecunious 
fellow who wants to take advantage of our 
climate and at the same time make ends 
meet. He will go into any business with his 
limited means, and is satisfied to live even if 
his business only pays the expenses — and who 
can blame the poor devil? He, of course, ab- 
sorbs all the soft jobs possible and is willing, 
as remarked, to work for expenses. 

Alhambra, one of the most beautiful sub- 
urbs of this city, only seven miles away, has 
raised a large cash bonus and put it in the 



local bank to be paid to some local electric 
traction company to build a road connecting 
them with this city. The Terminal have 
made overtures and claim they will build the 
much desired road, but seem so slow about 
commencing that the people of Alhambra are 
now contemplating building a short direct 
boulevard and putting on an automobile line 
of their own. It would be a good scheme 
and attract many people who would make 
their homes in Alhambra. The many attrac- 
tions of this suburb with its cheap lots or 
acres, pure soft water, rich soil and most de- 
lightful of climates would soon bring a large 
class of most desirable residents if proper 
means of transportations to this city was 
once assured. 

The first event in the great yacht race be- 
tween the Shamrock and the Columbia for the 
America's cup will take place Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 3. There is a great deal of guessing going 
on as to which will be the winner, all of which 
is mere surmise. There is no doubt but that 
the race will be for blood. It will be a fair 
race and the best sailors will win, as it is con- 
ceded that both yachts are about equal in all 
their points as to speed. 

Intricacies of language: "What does the 
young man propose to do?" Inquired Mrs. 
Cumrox. "I think, mamma," answered her 
daughter, in a tone of slight annoyance, "that 
he proposes to propose." " Oh, you think 
that do you? Well, what I desire to know 
about his purpo3e is this: When does he pur- 
pose to quit purposing and propose?"— Wash- 
ington Star. 



| OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

1 he M run Routt to 
.Santa Monk a.... 

I.KAVK FOURTH ST.. I.os Angeles, every thirt> min- 
utes on the hour and half hour Irom (t.M) a in. to 7.30 
p Dt.| B 30, 11.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LKAVK BAND STAND, Santa Monica, every half 
i hour on the quarter ami three quartet from 5.48 » in. to 
r 7.45 p.m., 8.45, 'J.4.'<, U', It 

— — 

«*««««****«««*«*«««««««*«*««*««**« 

t DRINK 9=7 \ 



OLE IN ROCK 



m 

£ A Pure Mountain Spring J 

ff Main Office Nowberry's Crystal Water > 
J 216S. Spring St. * 
««ft*ftft***ftft«A«ft*ft*A*««*ft*ftftftft«ftft** 



vvvvvvvvvvvvuvvvvvvvv^vvvvvvvvvvvv 




Pboto= 
graphic I 
Supplies 



* 

* 
* 

tel. m. i2oi * 

* Los Angeles, Cal. ^^VMVWvO^^: « 

[ERE IS JUST ONE >; 



■I' i — 



LOS ANGELES CLOTHING STOGE 

WE «« IT 



SUITS, $20 oo down 



Your Monuy Back 

if you want It 



> 
» 
> 
> 

> 

> 
> 



W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. i he only 
manufacturer in S. California. Rtmember the 
number, 2I3 VV. Fourth St. 



| LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY § 

X I I 7 to I 25 North Spring St. 

Abbott Kinney (who does not lake much 
pride in his golf dialect) — Dat vas mucho 
malo stimie, gude mon. 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Ev?ry individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Thy Cke.mk de Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. second St. 

Beers 

ADLOFF & HAUERWAAS 

Sole agents for John Wieland and Jos. Bchlltc 
Laget Beers on draught at all principal saloons 
in the city. Family tra<le solicited. Phone M 408 



Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

We have just bought out Chafm & Fabricks 
stocks of Waltham, Comet and Special Wheels 
at a reduced price. We will sell them re- 
gardless of cost. Now is your chance to get a 
bargain. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder ami Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115J4 N. Main St., Los Anoei.es 

Carpet Cleaning: 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of viilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 641 South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Rout. Jordan 

Electrical Contractors 
WOODILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORI'ORATKD) 

Electrical Supplies and Healing Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Third Kt 

TkLKFHONI Main 112>. 

Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make tine halftones. Hnei-utB, embossing plates 
newspaper cuta— just any hlug you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times "Building, I.os 
Angeles. 



Real Estate 

" Mayiie finds the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Keal Kstale Agents 

118 West Fourth St. - - LosAnoei.es 

Printing- 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New Hioh St. - - LosAnoei.es 



Veterinary Surgeon 

R. J. WITHERS, M. D. 

Veterinarian, Canine Specialist. Proprietor 
Chicago Veterinary Hospital, r.27 South Main 
street Telephones: Main 1152, White 2131. 



Announcement 

High- class Ladies' Tailor 

We have opened a well-appointed De 
partment of L&dies' Tailoring. We are 
turning out work in this department up 
to our high standard. Material and work 
equal to best New York tailors. 

/. KORN 

Tel. 'Red 37 U 348 South c Broad'WAy 

NOTICE 

The I.os Angeles City W tcr Company will 
strictly enforce the following rule The hours 
for sprinkling are between »1 and 8 o'clock a. m. 
and 8 and x o'clock p m For a violation of the 
ah ive regulation the water will be shut off, and 
a line of %l. oo will he charged before the water 
j will be turned on again. 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1 25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip floors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



Wines 

TRY OUR 

GOLD MEDAL WINES 

(iuaranteed purity and age. FREE DELIVERY 
Southern California Wine Co. 220 West 
4th nt., Ix>e Angeles. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment oil mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Good Wall Paper 4%, 5c a roll 

Gilts 7'/ 2 c " 

Ingrains 9c '' 

Varnish Tile 25c " 

Mouldings 2c a ft. 

Window Shades 25c each 

WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



Oldest aiifl Largest I", ml, lii Souther. 1 

California 



Farmers <t Merchants Bank 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HKLLMAN President 

H. W. HEI.LMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiel 

(i. 1IEIMANN Assistant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Olaasell 

(). W. Chllds I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis II W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

*#~S|>cclal Collection Department Our safely 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent In its new tire and burglar proof vault, 
(Thiol) is the strongest, best guarded and beat 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple SU. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

A PITA L STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real eslale only 

j T. L. Dl'QUE ."..77. President 

I. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-Prcsldent 

' B. V. DUUUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper Cohn, H. 
W. O'Melveny, L. Winter, t). T. Johnson, 
; T. L Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. U. Kerckhofl", A. 
Haas 

Park Market 

CHAN. KKSTNKK, Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 

329 West Fifth St. 

Telephone lied B1Q 



14 



Western Graphic 




From "Lawn Tennis in Southern California" WAITING FOR THE FINALS 



Copyrighted 1«99 by J. C. Hemingway 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

THE pretty game of nets and balls and 
racquets is not a fad. Polo may come, 
lacrosse may go, and golf may stay with us 
for some time because it is an expensive lux- 
ury, but the game that originated on smooth, 
green lawns and is now played on asphalt 
courts will live on forever. There are so many 
opportunities for things beautiful in tennis ; 
such chances for picturesque effects. The white 
linens of the men, with the brilliant bits of 
color of their blazers between sets. The 
women, in all the pretty things that are 
allowed women, with short skirts and olive- 
burned arms bared to the elbow. Then the 
spectator can repose comfortably beside the 
court and witness the entire game, and a cup 
of tea or an ice and some punch may be en- 
joyed between games by all. 

But the younger folks have crowded their 
elders into the slower game of golf, where they 
may take their time and smoke a pipe or in- 
dulge in confections between greens. 

And so, for the fifteenth summer, the 
Southern California Lawn Tennis Association 
held its annual tournament at the Casino 
courts at Santa Monica. It has not only been 
a huge success socially, but the play has been 
superb, and at the various club courts around 
abouts there will be talk for the next twelve 
months about Hardy's drive, Hendricks' Law- 
ford, Miss Jones' volleying, the four brilliant 
Miss Suttons, etc. 

To the old-timer it seems a bit lonesome 
without the Carters, Walter Cosby, Art Bu- 
miller, Paul Arnold, Theo. Coulter, and Miss 
Gilliland; with jolly Bob Bettner scattered 
around everywhere. That soon passes, how- 
ever, before the rush of spirits and snappy 
work of the new generation, and it is time for 
the back number to hold his tongue, except to 
praise their excellent tennis, of the youngsters 
especially. 

It was a disappointment to many that 
Miss Jones dropped out this year, but it was 
a generous act to give others a chance at the 
ladies' singles, and it would have been a one- 
sided match with the champion of the United 
States anyway. 

Then more than one feminine mouth has 
pouted with vexation when informed that 
champion Freeman from Pasadena was wear- 



ing furs and eating candles in the Klondike. 

Of the gentlemen the most interesting and 
brilliant players are Sumner Hardy, Braly, 
Sinsabaugh, Bell, Daggett, Hendricks and 
Rowan. For the ladies the most gallant thing 
to do is to append the list of entries: Misses 
B. F. Boxall, Oakland; Gabriel Dobbins, San 
Gabriel ; F. Shoemaker, Pasadena ; M. Sey- 
mour, Redondo ; the Misses Donnell, Gar- 
vanza; Mrs. James Hendricks, Los Angeles ; 
Mrs. J. \V. Ruthven, Santa Monica; Mrs. F. 
A. Seymour, Redondo, and the Misses Violet 
Ethel, May and Florence Sutton of Pasadena. 

"Lawn Tennis in Southern California" is 
the title of a pretentious brochure just pub- 
lished by J. C. Hemingway of Santa Monica. 
It is a thorough digest of the game's history 
in Southern California and is handsomely em- 
bellished with half-tone engravings. Every 
lover of tennis should possess a copy, which 
may be had for one dollar by addressing Mr. 
Hemingway at Santa Monica. 

The surprise of the tournament was the 
winning of the gentlemen's doubles by the 
youngsters (by courtesy) Hendrick and Sinsa- 
baugh from Bell and Braly. It was a brilliant 
match and even when the game stood 6-2, 
0-6, 5-all and vantage for the boys everybody 
expected Bell and Braly to let out a link or 
two and win, but the younger players kept 
their heads and by the finest kind of team 
work ended the match in their favor, 7-5. 

Of course Hardy won the singles and the 
cup, though Bell showed the better staying 
qualities and made the last set deuce. 

As Western Graphic goes to press the 
ladies doubles and singles and mixed doubles 
are being wound up, and tonight the big ten- 
nis ball will close the tournament. 

The Coulter Dry Goods Company's great 
success in business can be attributed to the 
strict injunction given to all employees to tell 
the truth about each article Bold. To misrep 
resent wonld be a cause for dismissal. Again, 
every article is bought expressly for their 
trade and at as low a price as the artical can 
be produced. The company is satisfied to 
make a small profit. This is why the Coulter 
Dry Goods house has outlived all others and 
is recognized by all its old customers as an 
honest store. 





Western Graphic 



15 



JVational Guardsmen 

CONDUCTED BY BHIBLEY L. HOLT 

CAPTAIN H. D. Alphonso, adjutant of the 
Seventh Regiment, has applied to gen- 
eral headquarters to be placed on the retired 
list. He has retired from active work in the 
National Guard to accept a position at Ox- 
nard with the American Beet Sugar Company. 
He has been an energetic worker for the 
Guard in Los Angeles for the past nine years 
and was a favorite with his superior officers 
as well as with those under him. The cap- 
tain enlisted in Company C of the old Seventh 
Regiment on July 16, 1890, was appointed 
corporal January 28, 1891, and elected first 
lieutenant April 8, 1891. Colonel Schrieber 
appointed him captain and adjutant of the 
old Seventh August 15, 1894, and Colonel 
Berry reappointed him to the same position 
in the new Seventh Infantry on February 17, 
1896, which position he has held ever since. 
Captain Alphonso also served as captain and 
adjutant of the South California Volunteers. 

Lieutenant J. C. Mielke, formerly of Com- 
pany B of San Diego, has been commissioned 
first lieutenant and battalion adjutant of the 
third battalion. The lieutenant has been de- 
tailed by Colonel Berry as acting regimental 
adjutant vice Captain Alphonso, retired. 
Lieutenant Mielke served as first lieutenant 
of Company B, Seventh Caliiornia Volun- 
teer Infantry during the Spanish war. 

Orders were issued August 5 from head- 
quarters of the First Brigade as follows: 
Special orders, No. 19, ordering an election for 
second lieutenant of Company D, Vice Lieu- 
tenant G. L. Phillips, resigned, on August 22. 
Lieutenant Colonel \V. 0. Welch presiding. 
Special orders No. 19, ordering an election for 
first and second lieutenants of Company C, 
Vice Lieutenant George resigned, and Lieu- 
tenant Cole promoted on August 23. Captain 
Baker presiding. 

A meeting of the Armory Board of the 
First Brigade was held on the evening of the 
fourth inst. Captain Robert Wankowski 
of Company A was elected treasurer of the 
board vice Lieutenant Colonel Schrieber, who 
has entered the U.S. Volunteer service. A 
small room on the third floor was rented to 
regimental headquarters for the use of the 
band. The matter of renting rooms to the 
engineer corps of the naval militia was dis- 
cussed but no decision arrived at. 



General orders No. 8, issued July 22, 1899, 
contain some interesting items, among which 
are the following: Applicants shall pass such 
physical examination as will warrant the 
examining surgeon to certify "that, in his 
opinion, the applicant is free from all bodily 
defects and mental infirmity which wou'd in 
any way disqualify him from performing all 
the duties pertaining to military service." 
Where it is not practicable for applicants to 
appear before a medical officer of the Guard 
they may be examined by civilian physicians, 
who shall be compensated at the rate of forty 
cents per man. Paragraph 360 of Rules and 
Regulations has been amended so as to read 
that members who have been discharged may 
re-enlist within ninety days and be given 
credit for continuous service. The practice of 
revoking oiders making discharges will be 
discontinued. 



The allowance for the Seventh Regiment 
Band was withheld by the State during the 
time the regiment was in the volunteer ser- 
vice, although the band remained in the state 
service. It has recently been allowed, how- 
ever, for the whole time. This will provide 
funds for the payment of all the band's in- 
debtedness and allow it to start anew free 
from debt. 

Color Sergeant J. E. Sullivan has been 
recommended for the appointment of regi- 
mental quartermaster on Colonel Berry's 
staff. Sergeant Sullivan served as regimental 
quartermaster sergeant of the Seventh Volun- 
teers and his experience has been such as to 
make him the right man in the right place. 

Steere's Battery is expected to arrive in 
San Francisco about the last of this month. 
A large delegation of Los Angeles citizens 
will be in San Francisco to welcome the re- 
turning soldiers. The battery will be under 
the command of Lieutenant J. W. F. Diss, 
Captain Henry Steere having been assigned 
to the Thirty-sixth United States Volunteers 
in Luzon. 

The contract for the erection of the Sev- 
enth Regiment monument has been awarded 
to the Los Angeles Granite and Marble Com- 
pany. The pedestal will be of California 
stone and will be made here. The statue will 
come from the east. 



The resignation of Captain Lippincott, 
Company I of Pasadena, has been received at 
general headquarters and was accepted in 
general orders No. 5. 

main street 
bet. fi:jst 
and second 

Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Aug. 21. 

The I'eonzos, the Rarrelistic Wonders. 

Allien and Hill, the Rag Time Comedians. 

Lyiiton and Mclntyre, the Popular Duo. 

Hen- Von Palm, the Lightning Oil Painter. 

Cotton & Long, the Californians— oi_e more week only. 

La Fafalla, the Lotus Flower. 

A.delman, the Musical. 

Dave Meier, Champion Bag Puncher of the World. 




PRICES never changing— 25c and ftCc: (iallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



PROFESSIONAL 


DIRECTORY 


PHYSICIANS AND 


SURGEONS 


ELIZABETH A. F0LLANSBEE 


Office hours xtoDa.m 
1 to I p. m 


315 SO. BROADWAY 




Rooms : 332-334 Laughlln Building 


Tel. Main 73" 


H. S. 0RME 


,., . . (Office Main 6*0 
lels - (Res. Maiu 300 


116117 DOUGLAS BLDG 


RESIDENCE 


Third and Spring Streets 


245 N. BITNKKK HILL 


TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

32&330 WILCOX BUILDING 


Hours— 10-12 a.m. 
2-1 p.m. 


Tel. Main (ill 


Rusihence: THE LOCKE 


IIKNTISTS 


D. CAVE 




LANKERSKIM BLOCK 


Tel. Main 1616 


126 Went Third Street 








Santa Fe Route 



Summer Time Table 

Daily Hekvick 
Leaved Ixm Angeles 9.55 a.m. 1.30 p. in. 
Arrives at Rcdondo 1".35 a. m. 2.10 p. B, 

Simmy Baa V10I 
Leaves Los A Dgeltt K.30a.m. 9.56a.m. 

1 .30 p. in. 6.35 p. m. 
Arrives at Redo do 9.10 a, m. 1035n. m. 

2.10 p.m. 6.10 p.m. 
I .a-' Train Returning Leaves Rcdondo 

Sunday Concerts by 
Seventh Regiment Band 



5.35 p. m. 
6 10 p. III. 



7 oo p. m. 

7 40 p. m. 
s.00 p. in. 



X Mmuscmcnts 

TN DEFERENCE to the historical reputa- 
1 of Miss Laura Joyce Bell and the oiliness 
of her advance notices I was inclined toattrihute 
her poor work of last week to her mistaken 
idea of the requirements of vaudeville. After 
sitting through "Wig and Gown" another 
evening I am convinced that she cannot act, 
that she ought to do an Irish turn witli plenty 
of the knockabout in it. Her propensity for 
racing around the stage with fingers extended 
makes her look as if she were hunting a lowel 
with soap in her eyes. But the play is a poor 
affair to start with and the necessity of a 
heart-broken girl displaying her temper and 
injured feelings before a third party is an un- 
fortunate incongruity by the author. Miss 
Bell has said that she is having an up-to-date 
sketch written for her, which statement some- 
what softens the outraged feelings of her audi- 
dience. 

Tdalene Cotton and Nick Long make good. 
Miss Cotton (Mrs. Nick Long) is none other 
than the daughter of the famous old-time 
minstrel, Ben Cotton, dear to the memory of 
theatergoers of a few generations ago. It was 
only a few years ago that Idalene Cotton 
played juvenile roles in minor companies on 
this coast. She is now a tall, vivacious woman 
with a fund of talent that invariably makes a 
hit on the vaudeville stage. She is an artistic 
mimic and her imitations of French music- 
hall singers are particularly clever. Nick 
Long is the same old Nick that made euch a 
hit in the title role of the Private Secretary 
some years ago. He is old enough to wear a 
toupee but does not show it in his lively as- 
sistance to his clever wife in " Managerial 
Troubles." 

La Fafalla, whose name most people get 
twisted to Alfalfa, came as a rival to Papinta, 
glorious, fascinating Papinta. In a word, the 
copyrighted "Lotus Flower Vision" was a frost. 
Fafalla has the figure of a premier ballet 
dancer, and evidences the ability to give a 
good exhibition of that branch of Terpischo- 
rean work, but as a spectacular skirt dancer 
she is a total failure. Her accessories are of 
the old stereotyped cheap tinsel and colored 
lights order, and the memory of beautiful 
Papinta's beautiful spectacle receives an aw ful 
shock. 

Orpheum A suceeaaion of aplendid houses haa 
made ^lail the- heart of Manager Hronaon this week, 
and it ia his confident prediction that the bill ho 
announcea for next week will bring about an equally 
desirablo atato of affairs. 

There are to be eight acts on the new bill. Of 
these four will bo new and four selected from the 
current week's program. 

The new comers are headed by the Deonzo Bros., 
barrelistic experts. Thoir performance with barrels 
is said to be sensational in tho extreme. 

Linton and Melntire are sketch artists of tine 
reputation. Hill and Alden are rag time comedians 
and Hon Von l'alm is a lightning painter in oils. 
Ilia work will be a diatinct novelty. He is tho in- 
ventor of Loio Fuller's and Papinta's dances, and 
many thousands of dollars in royaltioa have been 
paid him by these famous dancers. La Fafalla is also 
one of his patrons. 

Cotton and Long will play tho fourth act from 
"X;r/.a" next week. Dave Meier, the bag puncher; 
Joseph Adelman, the xylophone player, and La 
Fafalla, the spectacular dancer, with new effects, 
will be on tho bill. 

Tailoring and Repairing 
Suits made to order, goods the very best, prices 
the lowest. Repairing promptly done. 

ILL. Yeuoku, 11H Woat Second Street, 




DISPUTED BOUNDARY AND WHITE PASS SUMMIT. 

The stars and stripes and the union jack mark, on the summit of White 1'as.s, iln- 
disputed Al.iskan boundary. The men in the picture are the Canadian police. The 
map on the left shows the boundary claims made by the United States and Great Brit- 
ain. It looks now as if a speedy settlement of the dispute would be reached. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"Itlooksjust like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & JENKINS 



5pendthe Summer 



AT 



1 



San Diego a nd 
Coronado Beach 



It costs no more than at other resorts 



s 



4 



POPULAR 
EXCURSIONS 



Last Excursion Sept. land 2 



Rate $3.00— Limit 30 Days 
Correspondingly low rates from all other stations 

I nquire of Santa Fc Route Agent 200 South Spring Street (cor. 2nd) Los Angeles 



Gardening fa 
Calif ornia * 




W. S. LYON 



New 
Edition 
Just Out! 



A complete non-technical 
text book on the culture of 
3 lowers in Southern 
California 

'XfyriUen for this Soif and CCimate 
jQicefy Tfhistrated 
&venj fever of tffoWers stionfd Have a copy 

Can be had of all Book dealers or by mail for 50 cents 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) '"SiS." 



GEO. RICE & SONS, 



INC. 




F)MNTERS -» 
UBLISHERS 



No work too large, too fine nor too complicated for us to 
handle to your entire satisfaction. 



311=313 New High Street 

Tel. M. 1053 LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Tufts' Electric Works 



0<] SUCCESSOR TO h>0 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 



701 South Main Street 



Electrical Repairing 

A. r mature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

a»«i Switchboard 

Apparatus 

First=Class Machine Work 

JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Proprietor. 



Press of Geo, Kice & Sons (Inc) 3U 313 N'w Hieh 8treet 



Western Graphic 




COPYRIGHTED 1S!N 



Volume VII. 
Number 9 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 26, \ 899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 




MADAME HELENE MODJESKA 



<P<p(p 



Western Graphic 




McCall's Fashion Magazine, 5c. 

Advance Sale of Blankets 

It is already a mercantile certainty that blankets are 
going to be higher this fall. Merchants who have begun 
to lay in their fall supply are astonished at what they 
have to pay for a good article. We make this sale with 
stock already on hand bought at the old prices. In 
most casts the blankets are sample pa!rs which have 
fallen to us at a discount. A few of the blankets are 
very slightly soiled from handling in stock. If you 
want a pair of blankets f r winter yo.i can make a very 
neat little saving by buying now. The prices range 
from 60: to $25.00 a pair. We quote these items as 
criterions to jiHge the stock by : 

$1.75 Blankets, $1.35 $2.50 Blankets, $ 1 .90 

1 1—4 size, dark gray, 5-pound weight, Snow white, half wool with fancy 
fancy border and a splendid wearing borders and silk-bound edges ; a 
quality. 

$2.25 Blankets, $1.65 



very exceptional value. 

$3.50 Blankets, $2.90 



Soft quality, half wool, medium shade 1 1-4 size ; 75 per cent, wool, beauti- 
of gray with handsome colored bor- ful border, silk-bound edges and 
ders; a splendid blanket for all around a splendid all-around blanket to 
use. buy. 

CALIFORNIA BLANKETS — Just the thing- for campers and seaside cottages 
$2.95 a Pair. 



COULTER DRY GOODS CO. 



317-325 South Broadway 



Between Third and Fourth 




THE TENNESSEE FIDDLERS' TOURNAMENT. 

It is said that Tennessee loves a fiddler. Bob Taylor made the violin a factor ir 
>ne. of his campaigns for governor. He was elected. In the western end of Ufa alatj 
1 fiddlers' tournament is held once a year. This year the tournament was held at Dyers 
burg. The winners are pictured in this illustration, made from a photograph. 



► - ^>. 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Entered at the postoffice in LOfl Angeles as second-class mai! matter 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Three Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 
Sngile Copies, Edition de Luxe, Ten Cents. 



-X* *d- • l* ale ^* tic aia ^ ala ^* 




Joskimi Maikr, 
Pres and Treas. 



liKOIti.K ZOBEI.EIN 



[N( OKKIItATEI) 



Vice-I'res. and Sec'y y, 

I 

I 

\ 



HOME INDUSTRY 
KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

Maier & Zobelein 

Brewery 



m 
t\\ 
$ 
<ls 
/is 

/*\ 

/*v 
/♦\ 
a 

# 

/*v 
# 
/|\ 

* 

/|\ 
/IS 
/IS 
/IS 

/♦s 

/IS 
/IS 
/IS 
/IS 
/IS 



OI'K KI.F.GANT AND COMPLETE 
LINK OK — — 



Fall a i d Winter Suitings 

is now in and read)' for public inspection. The 
fact that we are the recognized leaders of fashion 
and prices in Los Angeles, is in itself a sufficient 
guarantee, both to our many old customers and 
our contemplated new ones. Prices are always 
the lowest. Workmanship and assortment always 
the best. We will continue making this season 
our all wool, standard "Buffalo" quality 

MEN'S SUITS FROM $15.00 AND UP 

FOR THE LADIES— Owing to the great demand last season for 
Laidies' Suiting we have purchased in addition to our reg- 
ular stock of Gents' Cloths, a line of some 

400 LADIES' SUIT PATTERNS 

of 4' yards each, larger if desired, in Venetian, Serge and 
Covert Cloths, which we will take great pleasure in showing, 
advising an early visit to secure choice of designs. 

Buffalo Woolen Co. £5J3SH 

GREAT WHOLESALE TAILORS TO THE PUBLIC 



I 
\l/ 

W 

SI/ 

VI/ 

VI/ 

$ 
VI/ 

i 

\l/ 

VI/ 

1 

vl/ 

SI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 
VI/ 

& 

\!/ 
VI/ 

J 



444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal 

TEL. M. 91. 



'I A 

et I \ r\ 



212 West Third Street, Currier Building 

The Oldest, Largest and Best 

Offers superior advantages to young people desiring to fit themselves for useful 
positions in life. Thorough courses in Book-keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting and 
Assaying. Write for Catalogue or call on the Los Angeles Business College 
212 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

LA Oft C * vc^x^wvvssggssSSS 

♦ A* OUlphur OpringS and Baths 

• ~»>» Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. «> 

These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of $> 
Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. $ 

A. PTJISSEGTJE, Proprietor MRS, L. LAEIETJX, Manageress I 



LL ABOARD FOR THE BEACH! 



Hourly Trains from Arcade Depot for 

Santa Monica 

8.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. Also at 8.35 a.m., 
1.35 p.m., 5.1 5 p.m., 6.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m., 
7.45 p.m., via the 

Southern Pacific 

Fifteen minutes earlier than above from 
River Station, stopping at Naud Junction, 
Commercial Street and First Street. 



* ROUND TRIP 



50c 



J- j* UoolI Music, Good 
Hotels and High - Class 
Permanent Attractions.. 



«>t j. Last Train return- 
ing leaves Santa Monica 
9.35 p.m. 



TICKET OFFICE, 261 S. SPRING ST. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VII. 
Number 9 . 



Los Angeles, Saturday, August 26, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 
IRWIN H. RICE 



:-: :-: editor 

ASSOCIATE H DiTOR 



WERE the right of independence inher- 
ent in man it would disintegrate all 
government. Bat the tendency of modern 
civilization is rather toward the consolidation 
of peoples under strong gov- 
Morc About ernments than toward inde- 
Independenei pendent nationality. This 
tendency is more manifest in 
the Anglo Saxon, the German and Slav than 
in the various branches of the Latin race. 
The reason of this is not far to seek. It arises 
from a truer conception of the purpose of gov- 
ernment on the part of the former than by the 
latter, and also a climatic cause which makes 
northern races more dependent npon each 
other for their very existence. The breaking 
up of the Latin power following the vast col- 
onizing scheme of Spain after the discovery of 
America divided that race into many small 
nations each of which fell heir to factious di- 
visions that characterized their forefathers. 
Their idea of government was the power to 
rule as many people as possible, without any 
care for the welfare of the masses. With 
northern races, however despotic the govern- 
ments may have been, there was always a gen- 
uine desire and effort to build up the com- 
mon people. This is the foundation upon which 
the English conception of liberty grew and 
finally reached its highest ideal in the Consti- 
tution of the 1'nited States. 

The expansion of the British Empire has 
not destroyed the liberty of the countless mil- 
lions which are now subject to the rule of Vic- 
toria, but on the contrary, however much we 
may object to the means used to establish 
British rule, it cannot be denied that every 
barbarous or semi-civilized people who have 
been absoibed have been benefitted and their 
liberty made more secure Even the consoli- 
dation of the German people under the em- 
pire, notwithstanding the vagaries of the 
present emperor, has not abridged the personal 
liberties of the German people. Some of the 
rulers of small principalities have had their 
authority somewhat curtailed, but the people 
are more prosperous and enjoy a larger degree 
of personal liberty than ever before. 

The consolidation of peoples into strong 
nations is promotive of peace. It is but 
rarely that war takes place between great 
nations, but among small States it is of more 
frequent occurrence, the inhabitants often ex- 
hausting their strength in upholding the ban- 
ners of rival chiefs, mistakedly thinking their 
liberties will thereby be advanced, only to 
find themselves more in bondage than before. 

The reason the United States interferred 
with Spain in the latter's war in Cuba was 
not because the Cubans had a right to inde- 
pendence but because they were entitled to 
good government; and the reason why the 
nations of the earth permitted this was be- 
cause the moral sentiment of the world ap- 
proved of the action taken by America. The 
failure of Spain to govern her subjects with 
equity was the reason why her sovereignty 
was overthrown. The moral right of govern- 
ment is based upon justice, and where this i& 



lacking the people have the right to change 
their allegiance. 

In our eastern possessions, even if we ad- 
mit the honesty of purpose of the rebel lead- 
ers, which is of course conjectural, the peo- 
ple have not the intelligence, strength nor 
political training to warrant the belief that 
they are qualified or prepared to exercise in- 
dependent govermental functions. Their tu- 
telage has been by Spain, and their ideas of 
government are Spanish. This is shown by 
Aguinaldo speaking of Spain as the mother 
of the islands, and using all the methods of 
warfare so long employed by their former rul- 
ers. And then, once admit the right of inde- 
pendence to the inhabitants of the islands, 
the result would be a succession of wars to de- 
termine which tribe should become paramount 
— and the outcome would be that the whole 
group would relapse into barbarism or fall 
under the power of one or more European 
nations. 

With us it is an absolute necessity to go 
forward, subdue the rebellion and guarantee 
to the people of the islands a just and liberal 
government, or acknowledge that we are una- 
ble or unwilling to take up and discharge the 
duties which came to us through our own 
actions. Had the power of Spain been with- 
drawn without our interference there would 
have been no reason, other than the moral 
one which we exercised in Cuba — to protect 
the weak — for us to take up the burden; but 
this power having been destroyed by us, the 
duty rests upon us to fulfill the obligation 
thus incurred. This may entail a long and 
costly effort. The evolution of a people from 
barbaiism to civilization is always tedious, 
but the result to the people directly interested 
and the world at large is beneficial. 

No one can foresee the results of a war 
The French revolution was at first but an 
emeute by the rabble in Paris,it but revolution- 
ized Europe; the War of tbe Rebellion was 
begun to make slavery perpetual, it made the 
Blaves free; the attack on Germany by France 
created the German Empire; and Spain's re- 
fusal to free Cuba drove America out of polit- 
ical isolation and exclusivenes and made her 
a world power, almost against her will. But 
this national evolution was the result of far 
more potent causes than the Spanish war. It 
was the culmination of our growth to national 
manhood. We had subdued a continent, be- 
come the first industrial power in the world, 
and all nations conceded our right to a voice 
in international affairs. The Spanish war but 
opened the door, and as it swung to again a 
new era had begun. A giant had come to dis- 
turb the "concord of the nations," whose right 
and power could not be questioned. 

The result will be to create as great indus- 
trial interests on the Pacific coast as now exist 
on the Atlantic. Already there is a tremen- 
dous increase in Pacific commerce, and when 
the war in the Philippines is over, and the 
business of the country has had time to adjust 
itself to the new conditions the increase will 
be more rapid. Ho'ding nearly all the coast 
north of Mexico, and safe harbors in the Pa- 
cific and on the Indian Ocean, we will be in a 
situation to exert a controlling inlluence on 
the commerce of the great ocean. 

Few people realize the fact that three- 
quarters of the population of the world is in 
the Orient, and that inasmuch as the United 
States is the leading industrial nation, the 
Pacific coast of America is the most accessible 
route by which to reach the storehouses of the 
world's industrial and agricultural supplies. 
Westward the star of empire has been moving 
since the crucifixion, and now the East and 
West have met on our shores; and the ques- 
tion of whether the immense population of the 
Orient shall inundate modern civilization or 



be uplifted and controlled by it is to be de- 
cided in the near future — and commerce will 
be the most potent miissonary in this crusade. 

It is easier to vote bonds than to pay them, 
but the people must have them. They have 
said so, most emphatically, so here goes; start 
the printing presses and invite the brokers in 

to the feast. If the water 
Bonds Come question was settled and the 
ffigh t But water works turned over to 

the city, we would then be 
confronted with the army of office seekers who 
would run the business. The water company 
has been led to the water, now will he drink? 

It is to be regretted that the high -school 
bonds were defeated, if for no other reason 
than the bad effect it will have on the outside 
world. That Los Angeles should sit down on 
an educational want immediately after the 
great N, E. A. convention is at least remarka- 
able. C. Cassatt Davis of the Board of Edu- 
cation is authority for the statement, made in 
a speech at Simpson tabernacle, some months 
ago, "that only three per cent of the school 
children eligible enter the high school." This 
it would seem was evidence to the average cit- 
izen that the high school was unnecessary. 
However that may be, it is a fact that there is 
not sufficient room in our present high-school 
building for one-half of the young men and 
young women who apply for admission. 

But the people have spoken and their ver- 
dict is law. 

Of the innocence of Dreyfus there can be 
no earthly doubt. But of his acquittal there 
are more than misgivings. Because, for once 
in French history since the 
What Will Be days of Napoleon Bonapart 
Dreyfus' Fate? the army and the people are 
in tremendous sympathy. 
The best man France has had as chief magis- 
trate may be of service to Dreyfus should his 
case of innocence be clearly made out, for 
Loubet has the confidence of the people more 
than any man since Thiers, and Thiers re- 
signed in a fit of temper hoping that the Ver- 
sailles Assembly would refuse to accept his 
resignation, which said Assembly did not do. 
McMahon, who- had the army more than the 
people with him, failed to round out his presi- 
dential term rather than be stood on his head 
too often by the fiery Gambetta. Grevy was 
in hot water with the Chamber of Deputies 
much of his term and was forced out of the 
Elysee in due time. Darnot, the grandson of 
the distinguished Napoleonic general of that 
name, got along very well for a time, although 
not in great favor with the men who wear 
blouses, and he was at last assassinated. The 
nemesis of Casimir-Perier attended Carnot's 
successor so closely that the latter was forced 
to resign in a few months after his becoming 
President of the Third French Republic. 
Then came Faure, a victim of la folic des 
graudcuts (or, in a colloquialism of the day, 
"big head"), and it and apoplexy killed him 
in short metre. But this man Faure lived 
long enough to foster the movement against 
Dreyfus by the General Staff and the anti- 
Hebrew agitation. Beneath all this Dreyfus 
excitement there is an anti-republic sympathy 
at work and a co-operation of the Monarch- 
ists, the Bonapartists, the Headquarters Staff 
and the anti-Semites. There isn't a general 
of division or many brigadiers in the French 
army this minute that are loyal to the Repub- 
lic, and in case of the acquittal of Dreyfus 
they may turn their army against their Re- 
public; and the dear peeps, who are republican 
by heart, and who have been used as a cat's 
paw by the Headquarters Staff, will be used to 
fill military prisons and graveyards as re- 
wards. It does not look as if Dreyfus would 
be acquitted. 



4 



Western Graphic 




WA. SPALDING, editor of the Herald, 
• has produced a poem in meinoriam 
of his son, Hamilton Ward Spalding, which 
is a notable production. It breathes through- 
out a father's agon)*, but it is 
A I 'r/y Salable also permeated with the calm 
/// Memoriam philosophy of the unasserting 
yet ever confident thinker, 
who rests serenely on the center fact that a 
beneficent creator watches and wards us all. 
The poem is printed for private circulation 
among his friends by Mr. Spalding, and so 
has not been brought to general attention, as 
it should be. While it was written to relieve 
a surcharged heart, it is so noble that it should 
belong to the world. A few excerpts will in- 
dicate its trend and its power: 
O Azrael, saw thou not a youth 
Passing this way and faring o'er the hills 
Toward the land of shadows and the Night? 
Alone he hastened forth, as one that bears 
From Love a precious message and a gift. 
And he is tall and strong, and in his face 
Beams the clear light of hope and loyalty. 
Saw thou not the youth, () Azrael? 
He is my son, and he hath gone afar. 
Then said the angel. Death : . . . 

Unquestioned; unafraid he journeyed forth 
To seek the vast Unknown. I spake him fair, 
And with him walked beyond the shadowy hills. 
And gave commission to the Aider) land. 
O Azrael. my son is young and fail ; 

What need for such a messenger hads't thou 

And such a gift ' 

O Azrael, 

Thou hast so many, yet hath taken mine. 
Then said the Angel, Death: Be comforted; 
The young, the beautiful, the pure have gone 
Upon this journey and must ever go. 
If, since the dawn of time 'tis ordered thus, 
Dodst thou not see 'tis ordered well? . . . 



O Azrael, he was hut Nature's child; 

Life came, he knew not whence, he asked not way, 

But, with the steadfast faith of innocence, 

He lived it well and aye was just and true. 

Unawed. unhampered by the primal curse, 

Or by vicarious sin or sacrifice. 

He sought not creed nor craft to know the will 

Of his creator. When the summons came 

He yielded up the sacred trust imposed 

And, smiling, went his way. Is there for him 

A place within the Aiden land? . . . 

Then said the Angel. Death: Dismiss thy fears: 
He that doth note the sparrow's fall and holds, 
Within the hollow of His hand the fate 
Of all created things, is just and good. 
'Tis not for man to fathom all His ways. 
But be thou satisfied; the end is peace. 
That line, 
" . . . O Azreal 

Thou hast so many, yet hath taken mine," 
has been the cry of human heart, from the 
ages past, when the first child's final breath 
passed. 

"Oh, yes! Of course I had a good time," 
said R. H. H. Chapman of the Herald as he 
entered the local room on Monday, after a 
fortnight's vacation. "Perfectly grand time," 
and he gently caressed his 
Had a nose (he has considerable), 

Lovely Time from which the sun had care- 
fully burned all the skin. 
"Nothing but pleasure for two weeks,you know," 
he continued, and he put a big piece of sticking 



plaster on a lump on the back of his head 
where a derelict golf ball had made a deep 
impression. "Never enjoyed myself so much 
in my life," he added as he tottered to his 
desk, for his feet were all bunged up from 
walking the links. "Ouch," he muttered, as 
he reached for a pencil, "Oh! that's nothing, I 
sprained my shoulder at Catalina while pull- 
ing in a good tuna; its nothing; the doctor 
says I will get over it in a few months. Had 
a glorious time, though. By the way, I must 
get an air cushion for this chair; you see, I 
fell off my wheel at Santa Monica, and — say 
be careful, don't get too close to my leg; ran a 
fish hook in it at Redondo; it will heal up in 
a couple of weeks, I guess. Nothing like a 
vacation to make you feel all right. Good 
gracious, what are you doing? you stepped on 
my foot then, just where a stingaree stung me 
at Terminal. Yes, I'm ready to go to work 
with a vim. Say, Rossi, go out and get 
me some liniment, a package of plasters, some 
sunburn salve, and a bottle of arnica, and tell 
the doctor that I will call at his ofiice in half 
an hour. Glorious time! Feel elegant." 

Harry Hawgood, the engineer who did so 
much toward winning the San Pedro harbor 
fight, is back from a trip from the east. ' Had 
a good time?" "Of course," he said to me yes- 
terday. "Yes, I was in Wash- 
Harry Hawgoo i ington and did not you notice? 
Hack from Have not the papers written 

the East it up? What am I talking 

about? Why are you all 
numbskulls out here? Gracious heavens! and 
after what I did, you tell me that no one has 
paid any attention to it; that Wiggins has not 
called a meeting of the Chamber of Commerce 
to adopt some resolutions? Why, man alive, 
don't you know that as soon as Alger heard 
that I was in Washington he at once resigned?" 

They tell sad stories about Cal Bryne down 
at Santa Monica, where he is honeymooning. 
Cal has never been known to have any bad 
habits, and the community is mucn stirred 
about a discovery of a down- 
Caw this ward tendency that he has 
be Fart? developed of late, being noth- 
ing less than chewing pepsin 
gum. He has become so hardened that some 
of his friends assert that he does it in public 
now. His close friend and attorney, John W. 
Mitchell, is trying to reform him by inducing 
him to take a course of mint juleps. 

Those who were fortunate enough to be in 
Sacramento during the last session of the leg- 
islature noted the appearance in the capital 
city of a sedate and thoughtful 
Guy al the gentleman of distinguished 
Capilal mem and courteous, though re- 

served, manner, who mingled 
quite freely with the greatness assembled there 
and graced every notable occasion with his 
presence. Daily he stalked along the lesse- 
lated floors of the capital arm in arm with 
savants of the press and statesmen of renown f 
or hobnobbed in public places with the nobles. 
Nightly he lounged in elegant ease amid the 
sumputous upholstery of the city's grandest 



caravansary, flung his stately image into its 
polished mirrors, and at frequent intervals 
thrust his incomparable trousers beneath its 
manificent mahogany, and partook of its 
choicest viands. 

Soon after his appearance it became uni- 
versally known that this princely person of 
abundant and elegant ease was none other 
than Mr. Guy Barham, of this and other 
places, and many a man there was who, though 
Bradstreet or Dun might not rate him very 
high, would willingly, aye gladly, have sepa- 
rated himself from as many as four dollars — 
of most anybody's money — to have been able 
to state, with a reasonable degree of certainty, 
that he knew what quest brought Mr. Guy 
Barham here. 

But no man among them was able to so 
state. The secret remained a stcret to the 
end. He came, he saw, he concurred — and 
Sacramento still wonders what struck it. 

Now the secret is out, and the time has 



1 




"HE PBEQDKNTIA LAPSED INTO INTKNSEI.Y 
THOl'i'HTKUI. HOODS" 

come when the public shall be told about it. 
The sole object of Mr. Barham's stay in Sac- 
ramento was to act as an antidote for Gover- 
nor Cage. The people of Southern California 
know that Henry Gage is one of the best- 
hearted, one of the brainest, one of the grand- 
est men that the "cow counties" ever turned 
out, but they also appreciate the fact that he 
lacks elegance, that he lacks gentility, that he 
lacks polish; in fact that he is a diamond in 
the rough. 

So the people of Southern California held 
a secret meeting, behind closed doors, and dis- 
cussed the issues, calmnly and dispassionately 
Some proposed sending for copies of "Hints 
on How to Behave in Public," or "Ready Rules 
for Rough People," but those who knew Henry 
best declared that it would be useless to do 
that, that he would not study them, no mat- 
ter what. 

"The Governor will go up to Sacramento 
with those South-of-Tehachepi boots on, and 



Western Graphic 



those ballon-ascension pants, and the para- 
chute hat, and deep-sea necktie, and every- 
body that sees him will get a wrong impres- 
sion of us altogether!" exclaimed one excited 
individual named Mitchell. 

"That's just it," said the next speaker, 
whose name was Dunn, or something likethat. 
Strangers will think we are a colony of ex- 
river steamer deck hands, down here. It won't 
do, at all." 

So it was finally decided that the only 
thing to do was to send Mr. Barham to Sacra- 
mento, with instructions to counteract the 
Governor, as it were. Mr. Barham refused to 
accept pay for his services, and entered upon 
his new duties with a light heart, a steady 
nerve and a clear conscience. 

But the good people of Sacramento did not 
know how to place him. The gentleman from 
Siskiyou, for instance, having been introduced 
to Mr. Barham, bats his eyes, which are nat- 
urally a little weak, and cannot stand a great 
deal of splendor, strokes his greenish-brown 
whiskers, and, as Mr. Barham saunters away, 
says: "By gum! Ruther nice-lookin' feller? 
Come from th' South, eh? What deestrict 
d's he represent?" 

"Well, no district, particularly," replies 
the other fellow, "he sort of represents the 
whole southern part of the State. 

"Aw — y-e-s; I s-e-e," murmurs the gen- 
tleman from Siskiyou, and he winks know- 
ingly at the other, and mentally resolves to 
cultivate Mr. Barham's acquaintance. "Thank 
ye for puttin' me next," he says, aloud. 

After the session is older the gentleman 
from Siskiyou is heard thinking to himself 
as follows: "Dum nice young feller, that 
Barham. I reckon th' southern part of th' 
State's full of them tony young fellers. By 
gum, though, I'd like to know what he was 
up here for. I never run agin no such propo- 
sition before, an' I been here three sessions, 
now." 

So it was with the gentleman from Toul- 
umne, and the gentleman from Alpine, and 
the gentleman from Sierra, and they never 
found out, either. Mr. Barham did his work 
cleverly, and Southern California did not 
suffer in her reputation. 

The position, however, was a trying one for 
Mr. Barham. Though he is naturally of a 
light and airy disposition, before the session 
was over it was observed that he frequently 
relapsed into intensely thoughtful moods. At 
such times he would stand for hours, gazing 
vacantly into space, with a look of deep con- 
cern upon his strangely handsome face, failing 
to recognize even his closest friends and shut- 
ting himself off entirely from intercourse with 
his old companions. 

It was during one of these periods of semi- 
coma that the artist found him, and secured 
the remarkable likeness that adorns this page. 
Mr. Barham was caught in the very act of 
thinking, and is thus depicted. 

The picture has been kept from the public 
until now in the hope that Time, with her 
deft but unseen hand, might soften the lineB, 
and perhaps, in some measure, efface the 
traces of care stamped upon the lofty brow 
and about the placid mouth. But it seems 
that Time is laboring under the impression 
that Mr. Barham is still thinking, though the 
labor of his life is done, and so has neglected 
to attend to the matter. 

If you look closely at the picture you may 
almost see him think, though many months 
have passed and gone since last he thunk. 



But you can only guess what his thoughts 
may be. 

Each yearly, paid up subscriber is entitled 
to three guesses. The subscriber guessing 
nearest to the correct solution of the problem 
will receive one nice, smooth, green and 
striped watermelon, free. If more than one 
correct answer is received the melon will be 
equally divided among those sending in the 
correct answers. 

A stalwart figure, one that would arrest 
the eye of the most unohserving, is that of 
Prof. T. S. C. Lowe, whose name will long 

live as the builder of the 
P>of. Lowe's world-famous Mt. Lowe rail- 
New Work way. Prof. Lowe is not a man 

that one meets on the high 
ways and byways and he is not as familiarly 
known as a man of his prominence generally 
is; he prefers his study, where the completion 
of one big enterprise always finds him deep 
in the details of an- 
other project. Just 
now Prof. Lowe is 
promoting several gas 
companies in connec- 
tion with a new pro- 
cess of gas production 
controlled by the 
American Gas and 
Coke Company, of 
which he is president. 
The main feature of 
the new method is the 
economic extraction 
of gas from coal, which 
transforms the coal 
into coke of a greater 
efficiency than the 
original fuel. So 
advantageous is the manipulation that, when 
suitable plants are established, the Professor 
avers, railroad companies will be glad to haul 
their coal to the works and actually pay for 
the treatment, which would practically mean 
the making of gas for nothing. Professor 
Lowe is enthusiastic over the possibilities of 
the new power. With the present progress in 
the building of immense gas engines, some 
exceeding a thousand horse power being now 
under construction, he foresees the future pro- 
duction of electrical energy. "Then Professor 
Lowe's busy brain has not overlooked the 
poor man, and it is with pleasurable antici- 
pation that he describes the Bcene of the head 
of a house dropping a nickel in the slot of a 
gas meter, which will faithfully measure out 
an abundant supply wherewith to cook three 
meals besides the necessary light for the even- 
ing. 

Truly these are rosy views into the future, 
but the intimate friends of the Professor point 
with pride to the fact that from his daring 
balooning during the Civil War and a num- 
ber of mammoth enterprises in the east to his 
brilliant achievements on the Sierra Madre 
mountains, he has never known failure, and 
it is the stupefying prospectives of such men 
that in after years are referred to as proph- 
esies. Personally Professor Lowe is a man 
whom it is a delight to meet. His calm, 
pleasant demeanor makes him most comfort- 
ably approachable, while his sense of humor 
at once removes the reserve that one naturally 
expects in a man of genius. 



Hbout the House 




PROF. T. S. C. LOWE 



The parson — "I heah de angels donefotcht 
yo anudder baby brudder?" Little pickaniny 
— "Yaas, but it jest seems lak dem angels 
picks us out de blackest babies up dere!" — 



rllK foundation of the habit is almost 
invariably laid in childhood. "Tom 
cannot abide roast mutton,'' says the mother, 
with an intonation which fastens the idea in 
Tom's small mind that the disinclination, 
once or twice expressed, per- 
The Finical haps when he had eaten too 
Feeder many surreptitious sweets, in 

some way confers importance 
upon him. The next time roast mutton is 
the piece de resistance of the family dinner 
he refuses it yet more pointedly and sulks un- 
til a tid bit he can "abide" is laid upon his 
plate. 

The whim grows by what it does not feed 
upon. One after another article of food is 
added to the list of the proscribed, and Tom 
grows into youth and manhood "a finical 
feeder." Wherever he is met with and at 
whatever age, he is a terror to the hospitable, 
an abomination in the sight of the boarding 
house keeper, and a smoke in the nostrils of 
sensible, commonplace people who have found 
other roads to distinction than the display of 
gastronomic likes and dislikes. 

When a woman cannot afford the services 
of a professional caterer the question of a new 
dessert for her "little dinner" is often a whole 
problem in itself. It must be 
The Secret of the sweet enough, but not too 
Frappe Glasses heavy. Sweet enough, but 
refreshing at the same time. 
Delicious to the palate and alluring to the 
eye. No wonder that she racks her brains 
sometimes to hit upon a dainty that will lit 
the occasion. 

A few evenings since, at a whist party on 
Westlake avenue, the hostess offered us one of 
the successful desserts of the season. 

It was served with frappe glasses, the top 
of the glass frothing over with whipped 
cream. Peeping down below the cream one 
discovered an ambrosial preparation of frozen 
fruit. It seemed to me that the llavorof every 
fruit of tree and vine could be dipped up in 
that one little glass. Cold, but not too cold; 
sweet but not cloying. 

The women of the dinner party could not 
help remarking how pretty it was when it 
came to the table and how refreshing when it 
reached the lips. Afterwards I interviewed 
the hostess who said the refreshment was home 
made. 

"It was not hard to do," she said. With 
a little thought anyone could accomplish it. 
Choose several fruits — say a pineapple, an 
orange, strawberries or Logan berries, a peach. 
These are carefully cleaned and prepared. 
They are then cut into very small pieces, dice 
or shreds, and mixed all together. Sweetened 
water is poured over the whole and the mass 
frozen to frappe consistency. As the ice is 
fitted into each individual glass a spoonful of 
whipped cream is dashed over it, after which 
it must be served very promptly. 

Dorothy — " Mamma, if I should die, would 
I go to heaven?" .Mamma — " Why, yes, darl- 
ing; of course you would." Dorothy — "And 
if you should die, would you go to heaven, 
too?" Mamma — " I hope so, dear." Dorothy 
— " I hope so, too, because it would be very 
awkward for me to be known as the little girl 
whose mother is in hell." — Life 

Mother — "You have been a very nangbty 
boy, Jack, and I must punish you." Jack 
(who has been to the dentist recently) — "Oh! 
ma, can't you give me gas?" — Alley Sloper. 



Western Graphic 




THREE AMERICAN SONGBIRDS 

MASSANET is to compose music for 
Miss Yaw's high notes. This is a dis- 
tinction that falls to the lot of few American 
women. 

Massanet is one of the foremast composers 
of the world. But Miss Yaw is one of the 
world's phenomenal singers. Her range of 
voice is alike famous and marvelous. 

There are three phenomenal American 
women in the world of song today. They 
have attained special prominence by reason of 
the remarkable range of their voices, says the 
New York Journal. They are: Miss Ellen 
Beach Yaw, Mine. Hinrichs and Sibyl Sander- 
eon. Here are three notable women differing 
in character and method of singing as much 
as possible. 

The human voice in song has for ages 
made the world stand still and listen, and 
when Miss Ellen Beach Yaw glides up to the 
top notes of her marvelous compass the world 
not only stops and listens but holds its breath 
in astonishment. There can be no doubt that 
she possesses a marvelous voice in many re- 
spects. Quite rightfully she has been called 
"the California Lark." Her life has been 
spent out among the birds and flowers, close 
to "nature's heart," and she is like a shy 
creature of the woods. 

Perhaps it is hardly fair to compare her 
voice with Sibyl Sanderson's, whose maturity 
makes her an impossible rival, or with Mme. 
Hinrichs, whose voice is so different in quality 
and tone. London usually knows, and Lon- 
don says that Miss Yaw can sing a little above 
three octaves, and that her low notes are mel- 
low and her high notes clear and sweet but 
thin. Well, naturally. Think of singing our 
F sharp altissimo with perfect ease! That 
note is clear as a bell, and the chromatic de- 
scent is accomplished with perfect ease. Of 
course this is a phenomenal range, and when, 
as some critics assert, the young prima donna 
is supposed to sing four full octaves, the sage 
old musician shakes his head and shuts his 
eyes in disbelief. If Miss Yaw can sing above 
three octaves she is a marvel. Even Jenny 
Lind could not do that, and I'atti is simply 
"out of it" unless she "kicked" for one of 
those seldom heard notes. 

But Miss Yaw is not alone in her well de- 
served glory, for there is Mme. Heinrich, whose 
voice equals Miss Yaw's in range but differs 
in compass. While Miss Yaw's top notes are 
sweet and piping like those of a bird, and her 
low notes are surprisingly soft and mellow, 
this other woman, now taking the European 
world of music by storm, begins her scale 
away down in the baritone region and soars 
up, up, up, until she stops four or five notes 
below Miss Yaw. 

It is the same wonderful compass but a 
different voice. A slight difference in years, 
too, adds dignity and feeling to this second 
singer. A wise musician has said: "You 
cannot sing until you suffer," and experience 
teaches us this fact. To compare these voices 
is impossible. Miss Yaw is very young, cold 
and without magnetism; Mme. Hinrichs is 
likewise young, but, with her deeper voice, 
more passionate and alluring. 



This woman was Miss Kate Fleming. She 
married Otto Hinrichs, an orchestra leader, 
after singing in his opera company for some 
time. She is now in California, after a suc- 
cessful European tour. 

Her voice is so deep as to startle the 
listeners, and her high notes are wonderfully 
full and sweet. Many prefer her warm, ardent 
style of singing to Miss Yaw's colder manner. 
Their respective ranges are equal. 

See what a length of scale these two voices 
cover: Beginning at the C below the middle 
C we have a complete and brilliantly executed 
scale up to that wonderful F altisimo, to which 
we must accord Miss Yaw the palm. Surely 
such voices as these are seldom, if ever, heard. 
Madame Hinrichs begins in the realms of the 
bassos or baritones, and Miss Yaw finishes up 
among the clouds, where the birds are ! 

Sibyl Sanderson is the "happy medium." 
Her range is from the middle C to the com- 
mon high C, but she has struck, for Massenet's 
opera, "Esclarmonde," the F natural above. 
In earlier days these exceptional notes were 
lovely. Every one knows her romantic and 
checkered history, and how her witching voice 
brought the hearts of the roynl to her feet. 




MI 48 EI.OISE LEMON 
Violinist of California Ladies' quartette, direction of 
Madame Crawford 

The Czar, the unfortunate Prince of Belgium, 
lords, earls, counts, and last of all, Antonio 
Terry, the multi-millionaire ( whose sudden 
death and lavishly-spent millions left her 
again desolate); all these she fascinated by 
her voice and beauty. Years have dealt kindly 
with Sibyl Sanderson, and her voice and smile 
are as bewitching as ever, though there are 
minor notes in her songs of late which tell of 
ch irds still throbbing with pain. 

Her voice was never remarkable for com- 
pass, but it holds its place to day because of 
its sympathy and purity rf tone, which the 
French call "timbre." It is not everything to 
sing low and exceedingly high, but it is, per- 
haps more, to sing the medium notes with 
that full, sonorous roundness that feels its 
way into our very hearts. Sibyl Sanderson 
has no marvelous voice, but neither is it ordin- 
ary; it is simply a beautiful, (lute-like organ, 
throbbing along the notes in melody that 
holds many a throng breathless. These two 
newer singers may score many a triumph, and 
the low and the high notes hold listeners 
breathless, but the maturer artiste has no need 
to falter, for her laurel wreath will not soon 
be taken away. 



MUSICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MME. GENEVRA 

JOHNSTONE-BISHOP 

CONCERT and DKATOliin SOLOIST 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

Pupil: Madame Anna de La Orange. Pari*: Signor Ban dagger, 

Frederick Walker, London. 
Studio — Bi.anchard MisicandArt Bi ii.ding 
Residence -Bellevue Terrace 

Reception Day, Friday, with Mis. Modini Wood 

607 Kigueroa street. 

F R E D E R I CT^EVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 

230 Hei.lman Block 

THOMAS W . WILDE 

PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY 

Organist and Choir Director at 
St. Vincent's Church 
RESI DEN'ce AND STUDIO 621 WEST 17TII 



MRS. F. RIGDON WILLIAMS 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
and SOLO I'l \ N ISTE 

References: 

Blunchard Piano Co., L. A. SU SOUTH Main Street, 
Edward Schirner. Berlin 

Moritz Moszkowski, Paris Los Angeles, Cal. 



J.BOND FRANCISCO 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

I mi TF. AC II KK 

Pupil of 

K.mam ei. Wikth, Berlin 
Ben so WALTS ft, Munich 
Leonard, Paris 



Studio— 



BLvNCHARD BUILDING 



MISS MYRTLE C A N A D Y 

< ONCERT and SOLO VIOLINIST 

Evening Engagements for society events, parties, receptions 
and concelrs accepted. 

At Studio SUITE 316 BI.ANCHARD BUILDING Wednesday 
Residence- Thursday, Saturday, forenoons. 

Hotel Baltimore, 7th and olive Phone M iihi 

MRS. W. B. CLAPP 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Concert, Choir and Oratorio Singing a 
Specialty 

Chorister of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Tabernacle, of Pasadena, Cal. 

PASADENA, CAL. 

FRANCES LEWI S HO R D 

. . . VOICE . . . 

STUDIO, 300 Bi.anchard Building 
MRS. JAMES FRANKLYN (OOK, SOLO 1'IANIST 
in this Studio Tuesday, 
Wednesday ami Friday afternoons 

Reception ea<h Monday evening 

fred! a! bacon 

TEACIIKK OF VOICF. CI'I.TI KK 

Italian Method 
At Studio Wednesday, Thursdav. Saturday 
SUITE 31s, A 311) BI.ANCHARD BUILDING 




ROLLA E. GARDNER 

IJANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Studio. 230>£ South Si ring St 



MISS M. C. PEARSON 

VOICE BUILDING 

Vocal Culture i piano and pipe organ. Member of the 
faculty of the Girls' Collegiate school. 11)22 S. GRAND AVE 



M 



A R E V A L O 



GCITAB LKSSONS 

Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Also Voice culture 
Studio, 120 Wilson B ock, cor. Spring and First Streets 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AM) GUITAB 

STUDIO— 31 i Bianchaid Music Hall; 2 to 5 
p.m. (except Sunday) 
Vacation at Chicago Return about August loth 



EDWARD SIERRA 

of MEXICO CONSERVATORY 

Private Lessons in 

Piano. Mandolin and Violin 204 WILSON BLOCK 

*««*****««**««*«*****«*«**«***««** 

* * 

* What is the di (Terence between A GREAT * 

* ARTIST'S voice an<l that of another singer? J 

* QUALITY < 

* * 

tf What is the difference between the tone of the * 

I HflRDMAN mm 1 

* anil that of another make of instruments ? * 
% QUALITY 50,000 I IN USE * 

J! SOLE AG. -NTS * 

% LOS ANGELES PIANO COMPANY * 

H Phone Green J 444 313 S. Broadway. » 

* * 



Western Graphic 



7 




In the Gay Life 

FORTUNATELY, summering is not a joy 
forever. In fact, if the truth were told 
the days of rest are the hardest of the year. 
Every laborer is worthy of his hire, even if he 
does not always get it, but the poor society 
mortal is not always repaid for his toil, and if 
given a choice might almost as leave exchange 
places once in a while with that fortunate in- 
dividual who earns his salt by the sweat of 
his brow. 

Now what compensation is there at the sea- 
shore for tearing through miles of sand, never 
meeting any one you know, and never seeing 
— to quote a remark — a soul in bathing. What 
a plain soul would be expected to look like in 
bathing has not been revealed. 

All of which preamble is but leading up to 
a question put by a gentleman ^here in town 
recently : "Where are the people who go 
down to Santa Monica and what do they go 
for? One never sees them, and do they ever 
go into the water? 

Answer, anybody who can. 

This chronicler has not seen even a bathing 
suit worth chronicling, and concludes bathing 
has gone out of fashion — at Santa Monica, at 
least. 

However, this place of such deprivation 
has been otherwise employed by society the 
past weeks, and is at present turning its atten- 
tion altogether, one might say, in the direction 
of that engagement just celebrated of Mr. 
Woot'ward with Miss Margaret Winston. A be- 
trothal supper, given on Friday in one of the 
dining halls of the Arcadia, by the fiancee, was 
very swell, indeed. There were about thirty 
guests, a very "picked" — if one may be par- 
doned the word — number from the first soci- 
ety belonging to L09 Angeles and Southern 
California. Miss Winston is bearing her con- 
gratulations with that nonchalant ease which 
is said to be purely an outcome of centuries of 
good breeding, and which this young lady al- 
ways carries out to perfection. The fiancee's 
sister, it is said, and the young gentleman 
from Syracuse — but this is not for publication. 

Various friends of the betrothed have ten- 
dered their approbation, as well as good 
wishes, in sundry entertainments, such as din- 
ners, etc. — and the end is not yet. 

Among other entertainments taking place 
at Santa Monica within the past seven days 
were notably those given by Mrs. Otheman 
Stevens, Mrs. J. E. Plater and Mrs. J. C. 
Drake. 

Mrs. C. C. Carpenter is adding to her repu- 
tation as one of the first hostesses in society, 
in various smart affairs at.Redondo this sum- 
mer. A large card party was her mode of 
entertaining a number of her friends one day 
last week. 

Mr. R. W. Ozmun, cashier of one of the 
banks of Los Angeles, has just caused a little 
sensation in pleasure loving Catalina in the 

MI3C ELLANEO U~S 

MUSICAL PRINTING 

TOP NOTCH STYLES 
Concert Programs, Announcement Folders, Fine En graving 
Best Stationery 

WESTERN (iRAI'lIIC. 
Tel. Main 1053. BU New High St. 

G. A. DOBINSON 

I)K AM ATM TRAINING 
VOICKMid PHYSICAL ( I M l BE 
Studio 526 8 Spring Apply by letter or between hours of 10-I Jm 



purchase of that famous little yacht of Cap- 
tain Burnham's, the San Diego. There are 
(juite a number of society's votaries who have 
the most charming recollections of some 
happy days spent in that noted little craft, 
and it may safely be predicted by one who 
knows the new owner that there are ju3t as 
felicitous days to come. It is hardly likely 
that the San Diego will, however, figure pub- 
licly until next season, for the Ozmuns have 
been in mourning lately through the death of 
Mr. Ozmun's father, Mr. A. M. Ozmun, whose 
demise some months ago was a genuine loss 
to Los Angeles. 

Mrs. John F. Jones of Portland Square 
gave a children's party on Wednesday for her 
small daughter, Miss Margaret, who reached 
the happy age of seven on that day. 

Winthrop Hlackstone sailed last week for 
a four months' trip to Japan and China. 
He went by the steamship Thyra. 

W. H. Workman and family are at Santa 
Monica to remain the balance of the season. 

Miss Elsie Scudder the charming daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Scudder of Edwards- 
port, Ind , who has been visiting Mrs. George 
Rice of this city and friends in Pasadena, 
leaves this week for home, much to the regret 
of the many warm friends she has made dur- 
ing her brief visit of this summer. 

Rational 6uardsmen 

CONDUCTED BY SHIRLEY L. HOLT 

THIS has been a week of great rejoicing in 
San Francisco. The transport Sherman 
arrived Wednesday afternoon with the First 
California Volunteer Infantry and the Cali- 
fornia Heavy Artillery, and the troops landed 
Thursday 'midst such a reception as never 
occurred before on the Pacific coast. It has 
been just fifteen months since this regiment 
sailed for the Philippines on the transport 
City of Pekin, and it has done its duty nobly. 
During its absence the regiment lost only 
thirty-eight men, Captain Richeter and ten 
men being killed in action, one man being 
missing and twenty-seven dying from the 
the effects of disease. Eighty-seven men took 
their discharges in Manila for the purpose of 
remaining in the country, while thirty more 
who were discharged re-enlisted in the volun- 
teer service there. Nine sick men were left 
behind. San Francisco has not only treated 
her own troops royally, but all other volun- 
teers who have passed through or been quar- 
tered there, and the volunteers of the Eighth 
Army Corps will always have a feeling of 
gratitude towards the hospitable citizens of 
the Ray City. 

Company F last Monday evening presented 
a handsome sword to Lieutenant Louis S. 
Chappelear, who is now in the United States 
volunteer service. The trophy was presented 
in the name of the company by Brigadier- 
General C. F. A. Last, and is a beautiful piece 
of workmanship. It had engraved upon it 
"To Lieut. Chappelear from his friends in Co. 
F." Lieut. Chappelear accepted the sword 
with a few well-chosen remarks. It is prob- 
able that he will be ordered to Vancouver 
Barracks in a few days, as his regiment is 
now ready for duty. 

Lieut. Arthur F. Halpin received a tele- 
gram, Wednesday, notifying him of his ap- 
pointment as captain in the Thirty fifty Vol- 
unteer Infantry. Lieut. Halpin is well known 



in National Guard circles in Southern Cali- 
fornia, and has spent the greater part of his 
life as a commisioned officer in the armies and 
navies of Great Britain and the United States. 
He served as a lieutenant in the British navy 
and as an officer during the Soudan campaign. 
Since coming to America he has served as a 
captain and major in the Seventh Regiment 
N. G. C, and as a lieutenant in the Seventh 
California Volunteer Infantry. His aj point- 
ment is a good one and we wish him success. 

Last week equipments were received by all 
of the companies of the Seventh Regiment. 
The regiment is now more thoroughly equipped 
than it has ever been beiore. The recent issue 
consisted of haversacks, canteens, rjaeat cans, 
shelter tents, leggings, and ammunition for 
target practice. When the uniforms arrive the 
guard will be ready for active service once 
more. The percentage of attendance at drills 
throughout the regiment is very satisfactory 
for this time of year. 

Company A's baseball team now claims to 
be invincible. Three weeks ago they defeated 
a team from the Signal Corps with a score of 
25 to 5, and last Sunday they played the Re- 
dondo Beach team, whom they defeated with 
a score of 14 to 2. This was a big surprise to 
both teams, as the Redondo boys have a repu- 
tation of being a crackajack nine. Manager 
Sergeant Clark of "A" announces that his 
team is willing and anxious to meet any team 
of its class in Southern California. 

Company C held an election for first and 
second lieutenants last Wednesday evening, 
which resulted in the unanimous election of 
Commissary Sergeant Ray Follmer for first 
and no selection for second lieutenant. Sergt. 
Follmer served with the Seventh Volunteers 
as sergeant-major, and is considered one of the 
most efficient non-commissioned officers in the 
regiment. His selection is a good one and will 
tend greatly towards building up Company 

C. There was no eligible candidate for the 
position of second lieutenant and the company 
decided to leave the position vacant for a 
month or two, or until a good man could be 
found. 

Last Wednesday evening Company D of 
Pomona elected Color Sergeant Alba M. Hurtt 
to the position of second lieutenant. The elec- 
tion was conducted by Major I). R. Weller of 
the second bittalion. 

Private Lawrence I). Taylor of Company 
H, Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, who 
died in this city on Tuesday, was buried 
Thursday afternoon with military honors, 
under the auspices of the Red Cross. Major 

D. R. Weller furnished an escort, the Grand 
Army Drum Corps marched, and the ladies of 
the (J. A. R. gave their flag burial service. 
Rev. Will A. Knighten delivered the sermon. 

A few years ago the logs in a certain river 
in a northwestern lumber district had jammed 
into a nasty snarl, and no one hankered for 
the job of going out with a cantdog and start- 
ing the key-log. In the crew was an Indian 
who was noted for his coolness and his keen- 
ness. The boss finally looked over in his di- 
rection. "Lacoote," he said, "you go out and 
break that jam, and I'll 6ce that you get a 
nice puff in the paper." The redskin luoked 
at the logs and then at the boss. "Dead Injun 
look nice on paper," he grunted, and walked 
away. 

"Did you ever follow your wife's advice?" 
"Occasionally. But it utually follows me." 



Western Graphic 



4 4 Cbe Man mitb the Spade 44^^ 



\V KITTEN BY A HED-MAN-OF THE FOKEST. 



There are many things "writ" that should never be "wrote," 

There are tales that should never be told, 
These are mostly made up, of what never took place, 

Such as hob-goblin stories of old; 
But the time has gone by for such blood curdling mirth, 

—With its legends of grim-visaged lore; 
So you'll please forget this, just as soon as I'm through 

If I "get there," — that is, ere you snore. 

There are many strange things in this toilsome world, 

With its "whiz" and its "wher" and its "wheel;" 
Where the "Angel" of peace weds the Hero of war — 

While his "steed" is an automobile; 
But afar, far from these scenes of turmoil, 

There are mountains and hills and wide plains, 
There are places, for instance - like IjOS Angeles 

Where the weather is dry when it rains. 

There are ships on the seas where the thunder clouds coil - 

And the Albatross fans the night breeze; 
There are deep tangled wilds on this far western shore; 

There are birds and wild flowers and bees; 
There are deep-ladened cliffs where the mound builder sleeps 

'Neath the shade of the gray mountain side, 
And the sun flower leans to'ard the lingering west, 

Where the broken sky blends with the tide. 

Once I strolled to the crest of this wide gapeing cliff, 

Where it yawns o'er the sleepy sea side, 
And beheld a large ship with its fluttering wings 

As she reeled on the staggering tide; 
Then we sat down to rest near the crypt of poor "Lo," 

Still embalmed in his "(iky" of grey fog; 
And ',he lay like a warrior taking his rest," 

With his "untutored" "whose"— but no "dog." 

''What's a ship," said my friend (as she plucked a wild fern, 

Where the moss on the rocks had grown grey,) 
"Can it hear the sad songs of the mermaids that sing 

On the rocks, through the dashing white spray? 
Can she feel the caress when they waft her a kiss' 

As she trips o'er the blue crested wave? 
Does she 'rest' when she 'sleeps' in the slumbering seas. 

Do the coral wreathes twine 'round her grave?" 

"Has she pilotson board from beyond the blue vales 

Who can unfold their pinions and fly? 
Can she 'rise' from her 'sleep' in the fathomless deep — 

Are their 'mansions' waiting 'on high?' 
Can she guide the whirlwind when she rides on the storm. 

Can she hear the dread thunder clouds roar? 
Does she tremble with fear when the red lightnings flash. 

And the wild billows break on the shore?" 

As we spoke aloud thunder-clap fell through the sky 

—And a seagull chippered in the bay — 
And the black waters moaned, and the sad met maids wailed, 

— And a white little moth flew away. 
Then a sudden light gleamed on the seething sea foam, 

Dike a shaft from the regions of woe, 
And the vessel went down in its cargo of death 

To'ard the weltering shadows below. 

It grew dark and a misty veil hung from the sky 

Like a pall o'er the grief striken tide, 
And a strange echo soared o'er the wandering hills 

To'ard the place that has no other side; 



"Where's the ship," said my friend, "there is nothing there now 

Hut a wide open space on the stream, 
For the ship has now flown like a phantom at night 

From the mist of a vanishing dream." 

"Well, a ship is a 'space,'" I replied. "My dear friend, 

When the ship ie not there— if you please — 
And a 'space' is a thing that is no-thing at all, 

And goes roaming 'round over the seas; 
It's a ship when in view on the turbulent tides, 

— Often-times without rudder or sail, 
And they all drift away to'ard the whence nevermore 

On the wings of the winds aud the gale. 

"All the past was a ship when the ages rolled by; 

There is now but a lingering light 
On the cold, icy wave of that shadowy Btream — 

Where the ship has gone by in the night; 
It has gone to that 'bourne whence no traveler returns' 

And the dark rumbling ages now lie; 
It has now gone like the mist from a shadowless dream. 

And there's nothing now left but the sky." 

Then the storm clouds awoke, and the unfettered gale, 

Hurled the billows all over the seas, — 
While the startled waves leaped to'ard the beckoning skies 

As they whirled in the winding sea-breeze. 
It grew calm after while and we talked of that "bourne," 

And I said: "My dear friend, when we die, 
We go down like that ship to the fathomless deep, 

And thete's nothing then left but a sigh." 

"Here's a ghost!" said my friend with a wild sudden shriek, — 

And a faded leaf fell to the ground, 
Where the Sequoia stood like a monarch of the wood, 

While the grey shadows slept on the mound; 
Then the lurid green smoke from a phosphoric flame 

Seemed to rise like the mist from the dew — 
There were spectres in white, there were spectres in grey, 

There were goblins— red, yellow and blue. 

There were Indian tribes from the land of Shu-Shu, 

Where the white heron soars on the breeze; 
There weie gleams on the rocks where the white coral clings 

To the ships that "sleep" under the seas. 
There wore Piutes and Mohawks, Winniebagos and Sioux, 

Peg leg Smith and Kit Carson's grey mule 
There were other X-rays from the land of Hoo-doo 

In the valleys of Ultima thule. 

Then the war-song began with its High-igh-yah-hi — 

And the blazing red tommahawks flew, 
And the warriors waltzed with the shadows of deat 1 — 

To the tune of hi-igh-yah-hi-hi-ugh ! 
When the goddess of night with her silvery shield 

Crept away from the shadows below — 
And a skeleton form with a long handled scythe 

Stood aghast! like a man with a hoe. 

Such is life my dear friend, in this wearisome world. 

It all leads to the brown willow shade, 
Where you'll find a toll-gate which you cannot paBs by 

And just there stands the man with the spade; 
And the man who speaks last is the man who say least, 

And the reaper who reaps the corn blade, 
Must succumb to the man who turns over the sod 

And then gives it a thump with the spade. 



HOW MR. CASEY GOT RID OF HIS WIFE'S 
FRENCH MAID 

4 *"\/OU were intoxicated last night when 
X you returned from the club," said 
Mrs. Casey to her husband, in cold storage 
tones, as the third home-made Manhattan 
was graduating the pull at the roo!s of his 
hair. 

"I was more than intoxicated, Mrs. Casey. 
I was mad. I left this once happy home 
with a load on my mind " 

"And you came back, Mr. Casey, with a 
much bigger load than you took away, and 
you slammed the door so hard that all the 
neighbors knew you had been laboring under 
some great disturbance of mind, and that you 
had again been sidetracked by dallying too 



freely with your own embalming fluid." 
"What's that?" 

"You seemed to be more or less bouleverse, 
dear." 

"Bully varsay! Now, Mrs. Casey, what 
kind of a complaint is that? How dare you 
refer to my Jesse Moore'd Best as embalming 
fluid?" 

"I am afraid you are flambe." 
"What's that?" 

"You were a sight last night, Mr. Casey. 
Y'ou were just saturated when you were 
brought hon_e " 

"Was I really brought home, Margaret?" 

"There! I knew you didn't know how or 
when you got here. Yes, you were brought home, 
in a dismal looking herdic, and there were 
footprints of a high old symposium all over 
your garments. Y r ou were hors du combat!" 

"Was I horseducombar, too, dear? Well 



that was awful. I guess I must have been 
hitting Chapman's Wine of the Peerage too 
often. And so I was llambay and horsedu- 
combar. Well, well, well." 

"It's nothing of the kind. It is everything 
but well, well, well." 

"And so I was llambay and horse " 

"An ass, you mean. I have never seen a 
horse drunk." 

"That's the best thing you've said this 
morning. That word drunk is a good Anglo- 
Saxon word; or English, or American. At 
any rate it aint French. I despise your French, 
Mrs. Casey, and your society humbuggery. 
Don't you know you are making an everlast- 
ing laughing stock of yourself? How dare 
vou give yourself such foreign airs and talk so 
much about France and Switzerland when 
es'erybody knows by the cut of your nose that 
your ancestors are still inhabitants of Cork 
and Tipperary? You ought to be proud as 
the wife of Patrick Casey, who scorns society 
and the license tax and keeps his two bar 
rooms going Sundays as well as week days. 



Western Graphic 



9 



O, no; you want carriages and pictures and 
horses and dogs and rugs and statuary. You 
want to be a sort ot Mrs. Yanderbilt on the 
half shell, don't you? And how many hun- 
dreds of thousands of fool women there are in 
this land, just like you, sacrificing everything 
for show and humbuggery. Tens of thou- 
sands of families that get srt up a little go to 
the dogs every year because they must have 
cooks and maids and second girls — and then 
mortgages and illness, and, finally, sorrow 
and sometimes ruin. No wonder the men go 
off and get drunk. I have made up my mind 
to go on a regular old stem-winder that shall 
last a month — you hear me?" 

"I should think I did hear you; and all 
the neighbors are stretching their ears to hear 
you. I hope they won't think we are rowing 
over expenses. I wouldn't have them think 
we couldn't afford to " 

"Once I had a pleasant, sociable home, 
and a sensible, uncomplaining woman for a 
wife. Now I have neither — nyther! My 
house looks like a lot of overgrown auction 
rooms in disguise, and ray wife is so beside 
heiself with her objects of virchew and by- 
joutary that she don't know what end her 
head is on. You bet, I was intoxicated. Any 
body would get intoxicated under the circum- 
stances. The idea of you calling me a Ham- 
bay and a bull}' versay — with your byjoutary 
on the brain and your once happy home all 
stuck up with dados and other verchew. I 
may not yank the pronunciation of that last 
French word correctly. But no matter for 
that, my dear. Your French maid, with her 
measureless cheek, is more to blame for these 
second-hand chroinos and copies of old mas- 
ters, as you call them, and other daubs, than 
you are. Those old masters make me smile. 
And those water daubs, and your confounded 
bricker backs. They make me sick. They 
just make me tired, and I'm going to take a 
hand in this dado business, myself, and before 
we get through I'll make this sublime old 
roost of ours look like an insane asylum at 
lirge. What do you think of that?'' 

"I think you are quite impolitesse. But 1 
cannot stop very long to think, as I must go 
to the Demirep Club and read a paper on 
Emerson." 

"Well, I'll make you think I'm diabolically 
impollytess when you come home from that 
Emersonian racket. I'll go down town if I 
don't drop dead waiting for an electric car 
and I'll get a lot of second-hand soup plates 
and have them decorated with portraits of 
Mrs. Winslow cutting a pigeon wing on the 
head of a barrel of her double-distilled sooth- 
ing syrup, and Mrs. Lydia Pinkham knocking 
down Chief Glass with a bottle of her ever- 
lasting vegetable compound. I'll also have a 
neat etching of that old master Holman put- 
ting on one of his own lymphatic liver pads; 
and another with that sorrowful-looking Ish- 
maelite with a gallon or two 'of his nasty St. 
Jacob's oil on his ponderous cheek. I'll — " 

"You amaze me, Mr. Casey." 

"I do, do I? Ha! ha! Mr. Casey amazes 
you, does he? Well, he'll amaze you more — I 
He intends to get a lot of comic pictures of 
Billy Boy and some silver senators and all the 
cartoons he can rake and scrape from the 
comic paper8,and he'll have them framed and 
set up among your dear old masters, and then 
he'll invite his friends and neighbors in and 
see which selection pleases them most. And 
he'll have a few cigarette and axle-grease pic- 
tures stuck up against your dados, and scatter 
a few old bricker backs such as Mat irons and 
roller pins and biscuit moulds and other im- 
plements of the lost arts among your byjou- 
tary and objects of verchew and — you hear 
me, Mrs. Casey?" 

"What? 6, dear, what?" 

"I' going to purchase a second-hand organ 
that will play the Watch on the Rhine an 
hour or so at a lick, and every time that chat- 
tering exile from Alsace comes into the parlor 
I'll set it to going and — " 

But Mrs. Casey had left the apartment 
hurriedly, at this last inhuman threat, and 
the infuriated lesser half soon after departed 
to put said inhuman threat into execution. 

B. C. T. 





SIbere Cool Breezes Blow k 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 



T is no wonder the innkeepers and 
1/ ■ \1 lionifacrs of ihcliiii caravansaries 
v^J/k- along the coast war expressions of 
A extreme disgust when they survey 
their domains every morning through the 
drizzling mist of a fog. It has been discour- 
aging for all the people who cater to the sun- 
baked crowds from the big city and interior 
towns, for the sun has refused to bake prop- 
erly and the spectacle of men with overcoats 
and ladies with wrap3 starting for the beach 
is not at all unusual. According to the weather 
bureau man, whose duty it is to record in fig- 
ure and symbols all the idiosyncrasies of cli- 
mate, we should have more sunshine in 
August than in any other month in the year 
— about eighty- three per cent of the total 
hours possible. But if the last week of the 
month continues as foggy as the first three the 
percentage will fall to about forty-five. 

Notwithstanding the comfortable weather 
in the interior during the week, Sunday always 
finds the railroads taxed to their limits to ac- 
commodate the beachers for the day, and it is 
evident that a good many are taking their va- 
cations on the installment plan, one day at a 
time. 

Catalina is probably the only resort that 
is having its full share of steady business, and 
as a matter of fact this August has been the 
biggest month since the Bannings first began 
to push the island as a popular summering 
place. The over-Sunday crowd has several 
times exceeded the capacity of the comforts 
provided and not a few have cheerfully ac- 
cepted the soft side of a board in lieu of their 
customary downy couch. 

Terminal Island is growing in popularity 
at a tremendous rate and the seventh day al- 
ways brings a multitude of those who love its 
quiet waters and freedom from a reflected af- 
ternoon sun. Another season will see greatly 
increased attractions at this naturally attrac- 
tive place, when it will make another long 
jump toward the lead. 

SANTA MONICA 

THE tennis tournament wound up last 
week in a veritable blaze of glory. Bev- 
ies of bewitching summer girls bowed at the 
shrine of the bronzed and sinewy victors in 
the gentlemen events, and dozens of the van- 
quished sons of the earth vied with their 
more tender brothers in doing homage to the 
bright eyed girls whose names are written in 
the champion columns of tournament records. 
Wherever there grouped half a dozen the buzz 
was of tennis; when the crowd was only three 
it was still of tennis; and when the crowd by 
chance or intention dwindled to a company — 
of two— the talk was still of tennis— presum- 
ably. You know two people make so little 
noise talking that it is unfair to jump at con- 
clusions because the girl blushes; the young 
man might be merely be complimenting her 
Bister'fl tennis. 

The ball was a great success. It was a 
happy thought to have it at the casino for it 
removed so much of the stiff formality of a 
ball room. The association of 1899 will be 
Jong remembered as the best from many points 



of view. There was lots of fine tennis played 
and but few of the walk over matches that 
usually mark the first few days of a tourney. 
Then the cup holders and old championp, 

SANTA MONICA 



i Hotel Arcadia 




SANTA MONICA 
CALIFORNIA 

The New Grill 

Uiiom 
The Dining 
lioom 



The Parlors 
I All Look 
Toward tho Sea 

It seems to me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring nor whistles blow, 
Nor clocks don't strike, nor gongs don't sound, 
And I'd have stillness all mound. 
Such as you hear by ocean's side, 1 
Where surges roll and wavelets glide, 
Where air is pure and heart is free, 
That's surely where I'd like to be. 
If 'tweren't for sight and sound and smell, 
I'd like the city pretty well; 
Bat when it comes to getting rest 
I like the country lots the be9t. 
Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust, 
And get out « here the sky is blue, 
And say, now, bow does thisBeem to you? 

—Eugene Field, adapted 



Faster train service and 
more trains per day than all 
£ competing rtsorts combined 



Frank A. Miller 
Trop. ^ 





SO. Cell. 10th Annual Races • 

Polo Club 8 & 9, 1899 j 

OCEAN PARK, SANTA MONICA • 

• 

COMMITTEE-W. II. Young, I. H. Dudley, Wilbur Par • 

ker. .i B.Procter, M.(. Burmester, G. L. Waring. • 

Eight Running Races, distances from ' 4 mile * 

and repeat to l mile. Entries close Aug;. 3 1st. • 

For particulars apply to • 

(j. L. WARING, Santa Honlca \ 



\ Fine Fish 
\ Dinners 

No tourist considers a visit to California 
' complete until he has visited Santa Monica and 

no one seeking a Summer Kesort thinks of over- 
' looking Simla Monica. For fur and w idc has ex 

tended the fame of the excellent fish, clams, 
' mussels, cockles, lobsters, etc.. which are to be 

obtained at the famous rtstaurant, overlooking 
' the o< i nn 

, THE PAVILION 

, KCKKKT & lloPF, Props. 



| The North Beach 

|j Bath House 

'I Has perfected an arrangement by 

{t which the water in the plunge will he entirely 

T> Changed dally. This year a great deal of money 

t has heen put into permanent improvements in 

E and around the bath house, and it will he the 

fc aim of the management to cater to the best class 

P of people, by providing everything for their 

J\ comfort and convenience. We may say to our 

h old patrons that they will hardly recognize the 

P place on account of changes for the better. 



Itl 



Western Graphic 



through necessity and in the interest of the 
younger players, defaulted their honors, thus 
giving the new players a clean field and en- 
couragement to battle with might and main. 

Monday evening the Miners and Drakes 
and others of their set had some "doings" at 
the hotel which some of "weuns" who were 
not in it are just dying to find out about. 
Some say it was a cake walk and others that 
it was a kind of indoor football, but whatever 
it was the participants had a good time, for 
they are the kind of folks that expect to be a 
long time dead and cultivate the habit of en- 
joying themselves. 

The North Beach bath house was given 
over to a Catholic fair Tuesday evening, the 
affair to last until tonight. Ex-Mayor Billy 
Workman pushed the button with his own 
experienced hand. (The button was to open 
the entertainment). The admission is free to 
the fair, but it costs all one has on his person 
to get out if the bewitching girls and fasci- 
nating matrons get on one's track. 

Stalls are being put up at Ocean Park 
where the polo races are to be run on the 
eighth and ninth of September. There are a 
few of the sports from B'lingum down already 
and more may come with their ponies before 
the first day of the races. By the way, 
"B'lingum" is the correct thing for Bur- 
lingame, the center of fashionable sport for 
the State. 

Dr. W. G. Cochran has taken a cottage on 
Ocean avenue and with his family will prob- 
ably stay through September. 

Mrs. John E. Plater, who is spending the 
season at the Arcadia, entertained Mrs. 0. W. 
Childs, Mrs. Nat F. Wilshire and Percy F. 
Schumacher at luncheon Tuesday. 

Next Tuesday evening there will be a hop 
at the Casino, the guests to come at the bid- 
ding of Mies Bertha Crouch. 

CORONADO 

GOLF tournaments are the rage upon the 
beach. Members of the Coronado club 
are to have another malet today, the event of 
the week. The leaders in last week's tourna- 
ment were Mrs. W.J. Cook and F. E. Godfrey. 
The prizes were golf sticks, dear to the heart 
of the devotee. 

Mies Mary Healy entertained most delight- 
fully, at the golf club, Saturday afternoon, in 
the neighborhood of fifty guests enjoying the 
luncheon during the afternoon, while others 
were supper guests at the club. The rooms 
were beautifully decorated with the red Euca- 
lyptus blossoms and boughs. Music was 
furnished by the guitar and mandolin quar- 
tette of San Diego. 

Wednesday afternoon and Saturday of 
each week are special "Tea" days at the golf 
club and members avail themselves of the 
pleasures of an afternoon among the congenial 
surroundings. 

In the neighborhood of fifteen hundred 



visitors and picnickers from the vicinity of 
National City and Chula Vista spent Thurs- 
day at Coronado, enjoying what is termed 
"National City Day at the Beach." Fishing 
from the pier and in the surf were among the 
leading features of the day, and the results 
were exceedinglj' satisfactory. The handsome 
China perch and various surf fish, including 
croaker, abound just off the breast of the hotel 
and devotees to Walton's lines find exceeding 
pleasure and profit alike in their attention to 
the same. 

Mrs. Mary Kirby of Coronado and Miss 
Kirby have returned from a six week's visit 
with Mrs. Dwight Whiting at Los Angeles. 

Prof. T. S. C. Lowe and son S. C. Lowe of 
of Pasadena were visitors of the past week at 
Hotel del Coronado. 

Prof. Potter of Rochester, N. Y., recently 
employed by Prof. Henry Ward, has accepted 
a position with Prof. Lowe at Pasadena. 

Among Los Angelenos recently visiting at 
the hotel are: H. B. Rico, J. M. Beck, L. A- 
Phillips, N. B. Blackstone, H. W. Blackstone, 
C. A. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 0. T. Johnson, G. 
N. Luce. 

Mrs. F. 0. Johnson, Miss Rossenautt, Miss 
Hosper, Miss Knox and Capt C. L. Hooper, of 
the famous revenue cutter McCulloch, all of 
Oakland, were noted among visitors of the 
past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Bagley of Los An- 
geles returned home Thursday after a six 
week's stay at the hotel, accompanied by their 
sons. 

G. G. Luce, general agent of the Southern 
Pacific at Los Angeles, and G. F. Herr, also a 
Southern Pacific official, were noted among 
recent Coronado arrivals. 

Mrs. John Vance Cheney and Miss Hope 
Cheney of Chicago spent Sunday at Hotel del 
Coronado, guests of Mrs. Aldace Walker and 
the Misses Walker of New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Chambers, family 
and maid, of Los Angeles, are sojourning at 
Coronado, arriving the first of the week. 

Ex-Gov. Drake of Iowa, who is spending 
some time in California, was a recent visitor 
here. 

H. J. Woollacott of Los Angeles spent the 
early part of the week with his family, who 
are visiting here. 

The moonlight evenings of the past week 
have found the sea doing a big business in en- 
tertaining boating and yachting parties. 
Evening picnics on the beach have been ex- 
ceedingly numerous. The sea is a mighty en- 
tertainer by day but by night, when moonlight 
sheds its beams, the great Pacific, that borders 
about this happy spot, becomes a magic realm, 
with romance and beauty swaying all. 

TERMINAL ISLAND 

tt A SHIP in distress!" The cry sends one's 
ii blood cold to the heart. Involuntarily 
the fingers clench with an overwhelming feel- 



ing of helplessness, sending the nails into the 
soft, white palms — that is, nails that have not 
been pruned and hands that have come so 
recently as to be still white and soft. 

Peering out across the starlit water Tues- 
day evening the hardy people of Terminal 
could see the dim outline of a vessel rolling 
and plunging in the ripples of the placid bay. 
But not a cry was heard. With baited breaths 
the silent watchers took some more bait and 
drowsily listened to the sounds of music and 
laughter that floated across the water from 
the disabled ship. Under some circumstances 
the breaking down of the gasoline engine of 
the J. C. Elliott would make people swear, 
but the Long Beach crowd who were thus set 
adrift on a summer sea say they had a barrel 
of fun and hope it will happen again. 

Mrs. W. D. Woolwine has returned from 
San Diego bringing with her Mrs W. J. 
Hughes and Forrest Hughes, who will remain 
as her guests for a whi'e. 

Next Sunday a yacht race will be the at- 
traction. Five of the fastest sloop yachts 
hereabouts will sail a twelve mile course for a 
purse of thirty dollars, starting from near the 
end of the wharf at 12:30. 

This Saturday evening the young folks 
will have a cotillion at the Gordon Arms, and 
it is expected a number will come down from 
the city for the event. 

It is the time now when the early sum- 
merers begin to leave for their city homes, 
though their places are mostly filled by the 
late comers. Mrs. and Miss Kurtz and Mrs. 
Milner and daughter are among those who 
shook the sand from their shoes this week. 

REDONDO 

THE most important event of social in- 
terest at Redondo this week is the cotil- 
lion which will be given in the ball room of the 
hotel this Saturday evening by the young ladies 
of the hotel and some of the cottagers. Twenty- 
four couples will participate and the favors, 
which are extremely pretty and artistic, have 
been furnished by the young ladies dancing. 
Mrs. John F. Francis, Mrs. Wm. Pridham 
and Mrs. W. E. Dunn will assist at the favor 
tables. 

Miss Bond of Toledo is a guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Off at Redondo Hotel. 

Mr. C. F. Sprecher and Miss Blanche 
Sprecher of Los Angeles spent Sunday at 
the hotel and will be down this week for the 
cotillion. 

Miss Grace G. Wotkyns of Pasadena has 
been the guest of Mrs. G. F. Granger at her 
cottage during the past week. 

The guests at the hotel were entertained 
with seven-hand euchre Tuesday evening, 
tables being arranged for twenty one guests. 

Among Los Angeles people at the hotel 
this past week were Mr. and Mrs. Wesley 
Clark and children, Miss Cora Eshman, Mrs. 
J. B. Duke, Miss Woodson, Miss Lynch, Mrs. 



A PANORAMA OF SAN DIEGO WHICH SHOWS THAT THERE IS A SOMETHING THERE BESIDES BAY AND CLIMATE AND GRIEF 



Western Graphic 



11 



R E DO N D O 



VVVVVVVVV VVVUVVVVV WW WW WW vv** 



! [HOTEL 




* 

* ONLY THIRTY MINUTES 

* FROM LOS ANGELES 




g Los Angeles' Most Fashionable Resort 



» 
* 

4* 

* 
4* 



Finest and most Commodious 
Hotel on the Pacific Coast. 



Frequent Golf and Tennis Tourn 
aments. 



Splendid Surf or Warm Plunge 
Bathing. Expert swimming 

teachers. 

Here you may get the Finest Fish 
Dinners in the Most Beautiful 
Dining Room in all California. 

Transient Kate* ."><) 



Special Weekly Kates 

% H. R. WARNER, Prop. 

ft ft ***ft<*rt<rtr.*ft&ftftftftitft**ftit it ****** ** 

Los flntjeles and Redondo Ry. 

Time Card 

In effect June 4, 1899] © 

Dopot cor. Grand Avenue and Jefferson Streets 
Trains leave Los Angeles for Redondo 

Everyday 9.30 am l.HOpm 5.30 pm 
Sundays 8.10 a m 9.30 a m 10.45 a m 
1.30 p m 5.30 p m 7.U0 p. m 
Trains leave Redondo for I.os Angeles 

Everyday x.0(l a m 11.00am 4.15 pm 
Sundays 7.00 a m S.00 a m 9.30 a m 
11.00 am 4.15 pm 5 45pm 
Theater train Saturday night leaves Kcdondo 6.30 pm 

returning leaves Los Angelei 11.30 p m 4 

Ci |f Office 246 S. Spring St. Telephone Main 1031 .> 

L. J. PERRY, Superintendent * 

•>' 



Hotel, Bath House and 
Cottages Lighted by Acety- 
lene Gas. Only Hotel di- 
rectly at the Springs. Open 
all the Year. : : 



Elsinore 
Hot Springs 
Hotel and Baths 

J E. Z. BUNDY, Prop 



Kates per week- 48, 19, and 810, includ 
Ing Hot Sulphur Baths. No Con- 
sumptives taken : : 



ELSINORE 
CAL. 



r SGHRMSBL;RGl 



...WINES... 

The Host Famous of California 



mm 



1 



mm 
mm 



Light, Delicate Wines, 
Matured in Underground SpSpij 
W0M Cellars and Rottled with f0$B 
great care at the \ ineyard cSftggg 

PACIDC COAST A Q E NTS 

Sherwood & Sherwood 



Los Angeles 



Han Francisco 



I'ortlnndJ 



D. A. Cashman, Miss P. N. Trahn, Mrs. .!. H 
Ulley, Dr. J. II. Utley, Sallie Utley, Marjorie 
Utley , D. Monson, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Sav- 
age, li. C. Lynch, L. C. Easton, Miss Easton, 
Win. G. Young, Mrs. Margaret Berry, Miss 
McCullough, A. W. Beach-Avery, E. Toff, A. 
H. Stafford, E. C. Valentine, Miss Mabel 
Trahn, C. H. Reynolds, Miguel Tate, Mrs. T. 
Tomnella, Miss Boigone, Miss Tomnella, Jas. 
W. McDonal.l. 

Mr. and Mrs. \V. E. Dunn and Mrs. M. E. 
Winston are the latest Los Angeles arrivals 
for an extended stay at the hotel. 

CATALINA ^ 

THERE is no question about the popu- 
larity of ibis little principality when 
people come in piratical boats nearly every 
week for the purpose of robbing us of a few 
cubic feet of our incomparable circumambient 
ozone. But our warriors assembled upon 
the beach and by brandishing their clubs and 
uttering their terrorizing war cries (not the 
ten-cents-a-copy kind, but real throaty, fight- 
ing whoops) successfully bluffed the invaders 
away. 

The bright flashes of light from different 
peaks of the mountains lately are not dia- 
monds as many suppose, bit are caused by 
the heliographic work of the Signal Corps of 
the First Brigade N.G.C., who are perfecting 
themselves in signaling while enjoying an 
outing. 

Crowds of people enjoyed watching the 
divers cleaning and repairing the bottom of 
the tug Wizard this week. 

The aquarium is constantly receiving in- 
creases to its population and many are the 
curious things that live amicably together. 
Three or four big nasty-looking squids were 
put in this week, as well as a sea hare, which 
ejected a violet fluid, coloring all the water in 
the tank. 

That bankers do rest sometimes is evident 
in the care-free way in which Warren Gillelen 
enjoys himself, lishing and boating. E. W. 
Coes is another Los Angeles financier who is 
here with his family for a few weeks. 

Summer rates at Hotel del Coronado as 
low as $17.50 per week, and $22 includes 
round trip railroad fare, with bus and bag- 
gage from S.in Diego depot to and from the 
hotel. The cheapest summer outing one can 
take. 

Fuller particulars can be obtained of H 
F. Norcross, Coronado agent, 200 South Spring 
street. 

During a golf match between the Rev. Dr. 
Sterret and Justice Harlan, of the United 
States Supreme Court, at the Chevy Chase 
Golf Club near Washington, the doctor dis- 
covered his ball teed up in tempting style for 
a fine brassie shot. With the utmost de- 
liberation he went through the preliminary 
"waggles," and with a supreme effort — missed 
the ball. For fully a minute he gazed at the 
tantalizing sphere without uttering a word. 
At length Justice Harlan remarked, solemnly : 
"Doctor, that was the most profane silence I 
ever listened to." 



SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 



The late Duke of Beaufort was somewhat 
formidable in repartee. When Voltigeur, the 
French horse, won the Derby, a French noble- 
man came up to the Duke, who had bet 
heavily on the race, and, grasping bis hand 
enthusiastically, sail: "Ah, my dear Duke, 
Waterloo is at last avenged!" "Yes, my dear 
Count," was the reply, "'the French aUo ran 
well at Waterloo." 



-s) 4 -4 



ftanta Gataiina island! 

I 
4 



Three anil one-half hour* from I. oh Angeles 
Tin" Oreatesf Iteaort 

The l.o\ el iest Scnw ft he Yenr 

Climate near Perfection 

I'll lemii Villi Ing and 11 urn 

The great Singe Hide 



AlTOINTMKNT 



m --n HOTEL 

METROPOLE 



I nii|iie e\elu«i\e ittlnictiuim 

The Famed Marine (^aniens aw viewed 

from the glass bottomed Iron's 
The best and most plotnreaqne <:<rlf Links 

Round trip every day from Loi Angeles 

Sunday excursions, three hours on the i- land 
See H. It. time tallies 



For full information, illustrated pamphlc's and 
rates apply to 



Tel. M 3b 



BANNING CO. 

222 S.Spring St., Los Angeles 



TERMINAL 



ISLAND 



; % VV* VWW W WW 

i 



THE. GORDON ARMS 

Terminal Island, California 

Hotel just Completed 
Elegant Rooms and 

Piazzas Loosing Right out on the Ocean 

jrSi. Bath house in connec- 
Kates #:t to 84 a day K&K Hon with hotel. Pineal 
Special rates on jWR beach and surf bathing on 
application s&S r oast '. £'" u l ink9 . yacht- 
# _ „ _ . S&>S tag, lishinu. Ten miles of 

% S. P. flllfJerSOn m One road™ along beach 
I Manager ||por bicycling. 

1 Tile Attractive Rome 

<J To the Favorite Sea Side 
j5 Resorts is the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 





ins 


1 











\ Terminal Island, By the Sea -a 

Catalina Island San Pedro | 

Long Beach, Are the favorite and $ 

& most delightful places » 

'is rind only 11 short ride from Los Angeles, where can he $J 

0 found the finest Open Sea Untiring. Vaehl ing mill / 
£ l ishing on the I'acilic cohbI. 

<£ Information and Excursion Tickets on sale at Ticket y/ 

« Office, 214 80. Spring St., Los Angeles. a, 

to S. B. Hynks, Gen. ^lgr. T. C. HECK.Gen.Agt Pass. Dept. * 



mount Eowe Railway 

Magnificent I'auonuna of F.arlli and Ocean 
Grandest Trip on Harth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain. 
SfiOO feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Heautlfiilly furnished appartnicnts 
with or without baths. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

liuests reiiuiining one week or longer will he 11 1 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain anil return and a 50c round trip 
rale to Los Angeles, and 10c to Pasadena daily If 
desired. 

Tickets and full Information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Trallle anil Kxriirslon Agent 

214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main ')(,() 



12 



Western Graphic 




Seen from the fence 



By K. A. Bhininstool 



Hump Yourself an' Hustle 

Hold yer head up in the air when yer luck's departed, 
Keep a rigid upper lip — don't you never croak; 

Face the world without a flinch till agin yer started, 
Reckon 'tisn't any sin 'cuz a feller's broke; 

Allers room fer nervy men- make a fresh beginnin', 
Don't commence a-whinin' 'cuz you aint in the 
van; 

Roll yer sleeves up an' sail in, bound ter make a 
winnin' — 

Hump yerself an' hustle if you want ter be a 
man ! 

Never mind what other people say— jest keep on a- 
sawin', 

Bound tei be an endin' soon ter the world's 
woodpile; 

Don't give up an' sit around cuesin' an' a-jawin', 

Meet reverses as they come with a patient smile; 

Never any night so dark but there comes thedawnin", 
Rub yer drowsy eyes an' life's program keenly 
scan; 

Don't lay back there at yer ease stretchin' an a- 
yawnin' — 

Hump yerself an' hustle if you want ter be a 
man! 

If folks say you ain't the man in the right position. 
Don't you never git scared out by a paltry bluff; 

Show 'em that yer bound ter have loyal recognition, 
Let yer boss know that yer made out o' proper 
stuff. 

If you knew some feller stood jest a simply achin' 
Fer your job, an' schemin' ter work his little plan, 

Bet you'd never falter at any uudertakin' — 

Hump jerself an' huutle if you want ter be a 
man! 

If you fall it ain't no use fer to lay there howlin', 

Chronic kickers ain't the chapti Fortune's lookin" 
fer; 

She ain't got no use fer you if you're allers growlin', 

Fortune only comes to men built o' character. 
When you're down git up agin — bridge the chaem 
over, 

In the race for Honor's prize lead the caravan; 
Don't yer be a-laggin' 'long like a lazy rover, 

Hump yerself an' hustle if you want ter be a 
man! 

GOOD REASON FOR REJOICING 

"Waal, yes," remarked an old farmer from 
Gospel Swamp on Spring street yesterday, 
"that ere 'arthquake did do me a leetle dam- 
age. Knocked the plasterin' off'n the parlor 
wall an' jiggled the chimney down ter the 
ground; besides scarin the ol' woman so she 
had the high strikes fer durn near two hour, 
but the Lord love ye! That war'n't a cir- 
cumstance to the benefit I got outen the 
thing. Started the ol' well a llowin' so I'm 
gettin ten times the water I did afore. Nuthin' 
like a little shakin', arter all, ter get things a- 
movin'." 

MATRIMONIAL EXPECTATIONS 

''I see Bill is expected back from the Phil- 
ippines on the next transport," said Farmer 
Corntassle to his neighbor. 

"You bet; an' say; him an* 'Lindy Jinkins 
is goin' ter git spliced Boon's he gits here. 
Bill he got a Mauser bullet through his liver 
an' is drawin' a pension of ten dollars a 
month an' 'lows he can start in by hisself 
now. I tried ter git him ter wait till arter 
fall plowin wuz over, an' sed I'd gin him the 
two mewls an' the buckboard so's him an' her 



could go honey moonin', but Bill's one o' these 
ere cantankerous fellers an' fays he knows 
what he's a-doin', so I s'pose he'll have ter go 
ahead an' live an' l'arn. 'Lindy she's a-git- 
tin a skeeter bar dress made fer the weddin', 
an' has made a traw soe fer travelin', what- 
ever that ere is. Yes, Bill's goin' ter get spliced 
all right 'nough." 

AN UP-TO-DATE YOUTH 

A small boy who attends Sunday school 
in a Los Angeles church gave a pretty bright 
answer last Sunday to a question which was 
put to him. He was asked why the saloons 
were closed on Sunday and replied, "So the 
drug stores kin have a whack at it." 

OUT OF THE SHADOWS 

( >ut of the shadows and into the htiht, 

Out of the darkness to where skies are bright, 

Sunshine will smile at the ending of night, 

Flooding the valleys with glory. 
Out of the sorrows to paths full of light, 
Out of the wrong for the true and the right. 
Strength out of weakness we'll gain in the fight, 

Righteousness conquers forever. 

THE LETTER HE DIDN'T EXPECT 

A young man living out on Pico street, 
who works in a down town store, met a young 
lady at a social recently on whom he became 
quite smitten, and one day last week wrote 
her an avowal of his love in words of burn- 
ing passion, and eagerly awaited a reply. He 
got it when the postman delivered him a let- 
ter at the store, and asking permission to 
absent himself, went over to the library and 
with trembling fingers tore open the letter, 
but so many people were coming and going 
that he was afraid to read it in so public a 
place. Then he went back to the store, think- 
ing that in the seclusion of the cellar he 
would be safe from interruption, but a con- 
signment of goods arrived at this time and he 
was again frustrated. It was a mighty long 
afternoon for that young man, but six o'clock 
finally came and he hurried to his boarding 
house and went to his room, and was about 
to again attempt a perusal of the letter when 
a friend arrived and he was obliged to hastily 
thrust it unread into his pocket. After his 
friend's departure he locked the door and went 
to bed where he remained in a state of hor- 
rible suspense until midnight, when, being 
sure that no one was up about the house, he 
crawled carefully out of bed, lighted the gap, 
opened the letter, and, through a mist of 
tears, saw that he was indebted to Heinze- 
man, the druggist, for a box of Menin's com- 
plexion powder and a stick of mustache 
paste — one dollar and six bits! 

One day Tommy accompanied his mother 
on a shopping expedition, and seeing a large 
candy man in a confectioner's window, he 
paused in front of it with a wistful look; then 
turning away regretfully, said: "Mamma, I 
could lick that fellow with both hands tied 
behind me." — Troy Times. 



• [riSTCL • 

J u u Seventh and Olive Sts., Los Angeles f 




EUROPEAN PLAN-60 Rooms 
ELEGANT SUITS Rates 
WITH PRIVATE BATHS Reasonable 

Principal Car Lines Puss the Doors 



Correspondence 

Promptly 

Answered 



EL. McGONEGAL 
Proprietor 



St. Vincent's 
College - - 



GRAND AVE 
LOS ANGELES 



A Boarding and Day College for 
Young Men and Boys 

. .THE courses are Classical, Scientific, Com- 
1 mercial and Preparatory. Students who 
complete the classical course in a satisfactory 
manner are entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts; and, after two years of scientific or lit- 
erary study, they can receive the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Students finishing the scientific course are 
entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science; 
and if two years longer the degree of Master of 
Science. 

Diplomas are awarded in the Commercial 
Department. In this course, besides English, 
Arithmetic and Geography, special attention is 
given to Commercial Law, Book-keeping in its 
various branches, Banking, Typewriting, Short- 
hand and Telegraphy. 

Che Tall term Begins on monday, September 4th 

For further information, send for a catalogue 
or apply to the President 

VERY REV. J. A LINN, C. M. 



LADIES 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Chemist 

^^tPrice 50 cts 

North Main Street 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Che palace 

A Select Family Ke ort 

Patronized by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly litted, cool iu Summer 
and warm In Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra iu 
attendance. Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Itestaurant and ltefrexhmeiitg 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

The Palace Restaurant Company 




WARDROBES 



Made of Solid Oak 

Golden Finish— Good Values 



FOLDING BEDS 

I. T. MARTIN, 531-535 So. Soring SI. 

Wheel chairs sold or rented. 



Western Graphic 



i:; 



frou-frou's Chat 

Of the fads and fashions of Both Sexes 

PROBABLY every woman of good taste 
and judgment in dressing has had eome 
particular style of her own by which she 
abides the year round regardless of what the 
fancy of the hour may be 
The Well with Dame Fashion. I think 

Dressed Woman I have remarked before that 
I believe becomingness should 
be the chief aim of the well dressed woman 
and when she once finds a style which par- 
ticularly fits her she should cling to that and 
be content with a few little alterations by 
which she can afford herself a certain variety. 
In the matter of headgear this is particularly 
true. There are comparatively few women 
who are fortunate enough to have a hat for 
each gown ; therefore the one or two or more 
she is able to possess should be most carefully 
selected, not as regards the very latest idea in 
trimming and shape, perhaps, but at least in 
becomingness. 

Fringes have been struggling for a foot- 
hold for some time, but their success as a 
dress trimming next winter is assured. Fringes 

from one to four or five inches 
The Coming in width will be used, while 
of the Fringe Tom Thumb varieties will play 

an important role. Belong- 
ing to the fringe family is a decided novelty 
illustrating an entire overskirt of the heavy 
crochet effect similar in effect to the top foun- 
dation of one of the new types. It is shaped 
ready for adjustment but is intended to cover 
the front of the gown only. Long silky 
fringes gives the touch of completion to the 
sides and along the bottom. Swell dressers 



will recognize the great advantage of these 
fri